30

There's no appreciable difference. Just use the filament that fits your particular printer. If you don't yet have a printer, then I'd get one that uses 1.75 mm filament: 1.75 mm is increasingly becoming the "standard", thus being easier to get. Some filaments are not available as 3 mm. 1.75 mm filament allows for finer control, because ...


19

If you feel you need to clean the nozzle the best approach is a cold pull. You can perform this procedure with many printers, however, you should seek advice from your printer manufacturer before attempting this process if you have any doubts. With the previously filament still loaded and the tool head cold: Begin to raise the temperature of the tool to ...


18

There are many different approaches to solving this issue and most of the answers already are spot-on. However, the fundamental reason for the "warping" is incorrect and inconsistent temperature across the material. If there is too much fluctuation in the temperature across the object in this heated state can result in warping. The reason you see this ...


18

There are a few factors to consider those two: 3 mm More rigid - easier to print with flexible plastics. I couldn't make my 1.75 mm printer print with NinjaFlex using standard Bowden extruder. Can extrude faster Quality is less affected by changes in diameter - it is a concern mostly when using cheap plastics 1.75 mm More popular, easier to buy Needs ...


15

I generally agree with the points in masteusz's and Tom van der Zanden's answers, but I would add a bit more detail. Generally, the differences are minimal, however: Generally speaking, a 1.75 mm filament will make it easier to use a smaller nozzle diameter (<0.4 mm), allowing for more precise prints in some cases. 1.75 mm filament will ...


14

Typically an extruder and hot end are designed for one or the other, and cannot support the other without mechanical changes. The extruder may not be able to grip a smaller diameter filament with enough force to assure even feeding and retraction. The hot end, however, is much more complex. The filament has to be pushed with force into the melting zone, ...


14

1) Smaller nozzle advantage: sharper "corners" (higher X and Y resolution) 2) Larger nozzle advantage: faster 3d printing (because you can print the shell faster as each perimeter can be thicker so you'll need less perimeters to be printed to get the same shell thickness. Same true for infill). 3) Smaller nozzle disadvantage (varies, debatable): higher ...


14

All credits for the following go to user "vermon" who posted in this thread. The following is a heavily amended version from his longer answer there. Makerbot did start its hotend series using MK as iteration designator (for Mark). The first commercially available version was the [Makerbot] MK4 on the Cupcake circa 2009. MK4 was hand built with nichrome ...


14

This is typically caused by resistance in the tube or hotend but in your case it appears to be mostly caused by a very poorly designed extruder. The filament needs to be constrained closer to the drive gear. You may be able to drill out the PTC connector to allow the PTFE tube to reach closer to the gears or print a spacer to fit in between but you need to ...


12

This is a good question to make a comparison table. All-metal hotends Vs. PTFE liner hotends. All metal: Works well for high (+250ºC) temperatures filaments like nylon or PC. No need to replace the PTFE liner (pretty obvious). Retraction performs worse. Plastic can get stuck to the inner walls. This can lead to clogging, more likely when changing from ABS ...


12

Basic process To calibrate the extruder you would need to verify that the requested amount of filament is actually what is being moved by the extruder. Structural or temporary problem A first thing to check when under or over-extrusion is encountered for a fresh spool of filament on a normally good working printer is to check the diameter of the filament ...


11

I think (as do a lot of others) that the differences are rather minor. So just my 2 things I know from experience. We've been using 3 mm for some years and now we are moving towards 1.75. 1.75 mm filament is very easy to entangle, especially, if it is not on spool. You can even easily create knots on the filament and it is very hard to untangle. As long as ...


10

Most common problem with corners is to low temperature of heated bed. Set the heated bed temperature to 110°. If this will not help then try to set brim in your slicer. The problem can be cause by other issues. You can find additional tips in following Troubleshooting Guides: overheating (simplify3d: Print Quality Troubleshooting Guide) differential ...


10

Different types of hotends and extruders can lead to different problems associated with clogging. Based on my personal experience the leading causes of clogs and jams are the following Foreign material in the nozzle (dirt, dust, low quality filament) Mixing materials in the hotend (running ABS at 220 then switching to PLA without purging the nozzle) ...


10

The shape you get is quite easy to explain. It's the shape of the lowest energy possible in your situation. Simple but it doesn't explain the issue... or does it? It does. The filament cannot be put into the extruder as it becomes plugged. This leads us to some obvious explanations. You can read this post. So how is that possible that there is enough room ...


10

Your extruder is encountering resistance and the filament path is too open. Your teeth seem to be biting in too hard. Loosen up your tensioners a bit. Teeth biting too hard deforms the filament. Does that rough looking stuff feed through the tube smoothly? Any rough bits can catch anything in the filament path? It is preferable for the motor to skip when ...


10

Electrical engineering can be quite complex, but in this case you can save yourself with same simple equations/relations. Using the following formulae: Voltage ($\ U$) equals current ($I$) multiplied by the electrical resistance ($R$) $$ U=I \times R $$ and Power ($P$) equals the square of the current multiplied by the electrical resistance $$ P=I^2 \...


9

Makerbot claims the problems are fixed. I have heard from a number of resellers that the problems are fixed. Unfortunately, both of those are somewhat biased sources. It's surprisingly hard to get good info on the subject -- very few credible people are talking about recent experiences with the product line. Issue #1: The main surviving user forum (https://...


9

The "quick and dirty" approach is to just slap a bunch of Kapton tape on there. The more the better! (Until you need to dismantle for maintenance, anyway.) I find pre-cut ceramic tape + kapton tape "blankets" to be easy and effective. E3Dv6 and Replicator 1/2 style hot blocks should be compatible. Or you can cut your own using a sharp hobby knife. http://...


9

Printing temperature basics Manufacturers generally specify a somewhat wide range of printing temperatures, and what temperature you should actually need can only be determined by trial and error: The thermistor in your hotend is not 100 % accurate and may have an offset of a few degrees compared to its actual temperature. Your hotend has a small ...


9

You are probably right, I have a Tarantula as well, and this happened many times to me. The reason is mostly because the hotend fan gets too hot, stops working, then, the filament in the aluminium heat sink melts and sticks the filament inside the PTFE tube. Then, on the retraction, the PTFE is pulled into the gears just like on your picture. Also, the ...


8

In most cases, removing the old filament from the printer, inserting the new filament in, and running the new filament through the printer for a short period of time will clean the nozzle. The skirt of the print can also be a time during the actual print for the old filament to be flushed. Assuming the skirt is long enough, all that needs to be done is the ...


8

Adding a manually added brim with a larger bulk at the corner extremities that you can cut off after printing should help. My larger prints come off the printer looking like tents with concrete weights tied to their corners. The 'weights' are attached to the print by very short a 2-3 layer (depending on print size) brim-like strip that makes them easy to ...


8

I ask myself why people hassle with kapton tape when it is so easy to use teflon sealing tape to isulate the hotend. This tape is slightly foamed to allow better sealing when used for sealing "tube threads". It can be purchased anywhere for very little money and can stand up to 260° Celsius constantly and 300 ° for a short time (according to its data sheet) ...


8

I would say it's not the best approach. In the situation you've described I would rather install some kind of vertical ring a bit above your printer. This ring would organize your filament going from any direction. So let's assume you got one spool on the right and one on the left of your printer, both are 1m away from the printer itself. If you get ...


8

You can either flip the connector for the motor around (i.e. plug it in backwards) or (if you are using Marlin firmware) look for the following line in configuration.h: (using the Arduino editor open the Marlin file For your 3D Printer, one of the tabs is labelled "configuration.h" click on that tab to bring it to the front for editing. use the Edit, Find ...


8

The first is not suitable. ASTM96TS Sn96Ag4 has a melting point of 221–229 °C according to Wikipedia. Pb96Ag4 would be OK, but that is not lead free so doesn't seem to match your description. Update from comment to explain the letters and numbers: the data comes from wikipedia, the numbers are Tin(Sn) 62%, Pb(Lead) 36%, Ag(Silver) 2%, for example, ...


8

Here's the pattern. The problem is, you didn't slice the g-code using support. It won't print right without it.


7

This is a common problem with ABS. You might prevent it by enclosing the printer inside a box/chamber - that will create a warmer environment and the extruded material will cool down more slowly, hence not creating such a tension. Other option is to use PLA instead if possible, the problem is not so significant with PLA.


7

Thermocouples work by passively generating VERY small voltages via the Seebeck effect -- usually a few tens of millivolts. They're literally just a pair of wires made from two different special alloys, electrically connected together at the "hot" end. That wire junction can be mounted inside whatever kind of attachment tip or lug is desired. The fact that ...


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