19

No, the Flow rate or Extrusion multiplier is to compensate for different materials and temperature ranges. Where does the factor come from? Let's say we calibrated our nozzle for work at 200°C with PLA, so 100 mm extrusion are correct and want to print ABS. ABS behaves differently and we get bad prints. What is wrong? Well, they do behave differently in the ...


16

Stringing is often a result of too-high a temperature, or insufficient retraction. When there is highly liquid filament in the nozzle tip, it can adhere to the remainder of the print while dripping as the nozzle moves, leading to a thin string of the filament forming. As further travel moves are performed in each layer, this turns to a web. The high ...


13

Generally speaking, both settings result in the same1: The feed rate of the filament gets adjusted. Either you set a general multiplier, or you demand a wider line which does make it set a higher multiplier hidden in the software. 1 - if you don't look at any other factor that is! But... There is always a but, and this one is big: While we can work with the ...


11

The phenomenon you experience is called under-extrusion. Under-extrusion is the effect of extruding lesser filament than required for the print. The result of under-extrusion (depending on the amount of under-extrusion) can be described as spongy prints, gaps in prints/layers, failed prints, etc. As the amount of plastic flow is less than required for the ...


10

Assuming your filament dimension settings are correct and your extruder is correctly calibrated... Your extruder temperature may be too low. While 184C can be hot enough, it is very near the bottom of the range for PLA and it appears your filament isn't melting quickly enough to keep up with your other settings. Your extruder may even be running slightly ...


10

Different types of hotends and extruders can lead to different problems associated with clogging. Based on my personal experience the leading causes of clogs and jams are the following Foreign material in the nozzle (dirt, dust, low quality filament) Mixing materials in the hotend (running ABS at 220 then switching to PLA without purging the nozzle) ...


10

After much trial and error, I think I finally figured out the solution. Even though I could get better prints by tweaking with the temperatures, I could never totally eliminate the problem. The better I made it look by cooling down the bed, the more likely it would break free and the print would fail completely. At one point though I happened to print ...


9

Here's just a few of the things you might want to look into. plastic - some plastic types are more stringy than others and there's also variation between brands and colors. moisture in filament - water turning to steam tends to cause the extruder to ooze when it isn't printing, which can cause stringing. temperature - too hot or too cold can cause ...


9

(answering my own question) The problem was the extrusion distance settings in Cura's advanced tab, reducing the value to 1.5mm solved the problem. Other problems with the same symptoms: Partially blocked hotend nozzle. Incorrectly configured steps per mm for the extruder motor - this youtube video shows how to test and configure this.


8

SHORT ANSWER You're not supposed to do the single-wall perimeter thickness test to calibrate Simplify3D. That screws up the extrusion volume. The correct volume calibration procedure for S3D is: Measure actual average filament diameter and input that Print a 100% infill calibration cubes If the print is over-extruded (top or sides bulging), decrease ...


8

There is a trade-off between the length of the melt zone and the speed at which you can print. The filament itself is somewhat of an insulator, so as the outside of the filament is heated up by being in contact with the melt zone, the inside stays cold. Therefore, the filament needs a certain amount of time inside the melt zone for the inside to fully melt. ...


8

There are several factors playing together. For example orientation, printer & slicer settings and more. Reminder First of all, not all overhangs of greater than 45° need support. Many printers manage up to 60°, even 70° is not unheard of - with the right settings. Pretty much all printers manage tiny 90° overhangs. U-Bowls (open side up) Let's look at ...


7

The main issue with very narrow extrusion widths (less than the nozzle size) is that you get really poor "nozzle squash." The plastic isn't pressed down very hard as it's extruded. That causes poor layer bonding and weaker prints. The flow of molten plastic coming out of the nozzle must be drawn down by tension in order to end up smaller than the nozzle ...


7

I've personally had this happen when I had a minor clog in my nozzle. My first steps to fix this would be: Make sure the exterior of your nozzle is clean. I've had bits of plastic pull at the extruding filament and change it's direction. Attempt a "cold pull" or "atomic pull". On my Replicator 2 I do this by removing the extruder motor, heating up the hot ...


7

Cura has a setting called Combing that is enabled by default. This stops the printer from retracting if the travel is contained within the walls. It does this to speed up the print but you get oozing during the travel since the plastic is still in the melt zone. You can change this setting to no skin which will stop it from combing on the skin layers or turn ...


7

Underextrusion. I suggest upgrading to Cura 3, as you are working with a version 1.5. If you print PLA, you print WAY too hot (190-200 °C Nozzle, 60 °C Bed), if it is ABS, knock down the temperature a little. Check for a clogged nozzle. *


6

Lubricating the filament is the most common solution I've heard of to stop filament jams and clogs. Lubricating makes for a smoother ride through the print head. While you're at it, make sure that the filament is clean. The best way to stop jams from dust is to get rid of the dust in the first place. Some people recommend canola oil, which I've heard works ...


6

If you're extruding into the air, it's actually quite normal for the filament to come out in seemingly random directions. This shouldn't cause problems because the filament should always be getting squished onto the bed/layer underneath (or during bridging, getting stretched). The way the filament comes out in free air doesn't reflect how it behaves during ...


6

You are suffering from what is called "heat creep". Molten filament is creeping up the heat break and into the bowden tube, where it is causing a jam. You need to install a proper radiator block that is cooled by a fan, not just a lump of wood as a "cold end". The cold end is not just a connector, its primary purpose is to act as a cooler. A hot end on its ...


6

Basically, all movements are (small) straight lines, the volume of a straight line is easily calculated as you already guessed. To calculate the volume to be extruded you multiply the following parameters: the layer height (h) flow modifier (e.g. as pertectage) (SF) extruder nozzle diameter (d) distance of the straight line (l) With this volume you can ...


6

Divide the amount overextruded by the desired amount. If you wanted 100mm but got 101mm, that's 1mm extra, or 1% over. Use an extrusion multiplier of 0.99 (1% under) to compensate - AND THEN DO ANOTHER TEST to confirm. This modifier will be used by Slic3r to generate E values in your gcode without flashing anything. I recommend saving this recipe with an ...


6

Grinding is due to attempts to advance filament faster than it can be melted and dispensed. Try one or more of the following: Raise the head temperature (to meet current throughput demand) Lower the print speed (to reduce throughput demand) Slice for thinner layers (to reduce throughput demand)


6

A very helpful page for troubleshooting common errors is: Print Quality Troubleshooting Guide - Lines on the Side of Print It seems like your problem is inconsistent extrusion or temperature variation. From the photo you posted I guess that you use a big diameter nozzle. Keep in mind that your extruder might not be well equipped to deliver such a large ...


6

It is hard to tell from the quality of the picture you added, but this appears to be an example of either an incorrect height setting for your nozzle to touch trigger point (too large) or an under-extrusion problem that could be related to incorrect filament diameter setting, nozzle blockage, too high speed, slipping extruder gear, too less spring force on ...


6

In addition to the very detailed answers above, I would like to mention that the hardness of the filament plays a role too. Most feeders are spring loaded, therefore it depends on the hardness of the filament how far the teeth of the driving gear do sink in. The deeper they sink in, the smaller the effective diameter of the driving gear becomes. Therefore ...


5

As general advice, regardless of your printer, extruders tend to clog if: [Some of them might not apply to every printer, but they should be as general as possible] you let the filament run out mid print, most extruders have a "dead zone" between the grinding wheel and the hot end, in which if the filaments stays stuck there, your only option is to open the ...


5

You'd have to ensure that the joining portion of the two filaments do not "bloom" or increase in diameter, which would happen if unconstrained at the melting and joining time. Alignment is also critical, otherwise you have a varying diameter from one color to the next at the point of join. There's an item on ebay which is precision drilled and has precision ...


5

Very cool idea, One motor would definitely be more than capable of producing the required torques even through a flexshaft connector. For any normal sized 3D-printer the torques required, and the speeds you'll need for rapid response are well within the capabilities of any off-the-shelf stepper motor. Just a note on the idea though, with a normal, 'rigid'...


5

I think the command you're looking for is "Thicken". Recent versions of Fusion360 have moved this around, but now it should appear under the Create Panel when you're in the the Model mode (see the image below for details). A detailed description and short screencast on the Autodesk website here.


5

In Ultimaker Cura you can select only one of the the build plate adhesion options skirt, brim or raft. You cannot select multiple options. There is no option available in Ultimaker Cura to increase the outline count of the raft bed adhesion structure. Basically the raft exists of a line support structure as can be seen in the figure below. The line around ...


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