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31

There's no appreciable difference. Just use the filament that fits your particular printer. If you don't yet have a printer, then I'd get one that uses 1.75 mm filament: 1.75 mm is increasingly becoming the "standard", thus being easier to get. Some filaments are not available as 3 mm. 1.75 mm filament allows for finer control, because ...


28

Paraphrasing this site. Feel free to add suggestions in the form of comments and I will try to incorporate them. Summary ABS: Stronger, machinable, more flexible, and more temperature resistant than PLA. Typically printed on a heated bed. Warping is a common problem when printing ABS. PLA: Wider range of filaments available, easier and in some cases faster ...


21

Layer Times See my answer to this question and pay particular attention to my suggestion about a minimum layer print time. I'm not sure if all slicing engines provide this option, but I know MakerWare/MakerBot Desktop and (possibly) Slic3r allow this setting. Basically, when you're extruding smaller features like this, the previous layer(s) are still very ...


18

There are a few factors to consider those two: 3 mm More rigid - easier to print with flexible plastics. I couldn't make my 1.75 mm printer print with NinjaFlex using standard Bowden extruder. Can extrude faster Quality is less affected by changes in diameter - it is a concern mostly when using cheap plastics 1.75 mm More popular, easier to buy Needs ...


16

Stringing is often a result of too-high a temperature, or insufficient retraction. When there is highly liquid filament in the nozzle tip, it can adhere to the remainder of the print while dripping as the nozzle moves, leading to a thin string of the filament forming. As further travel moves are performed in each layer, this turns to a web. The high ...


16

I generally agree with the points in masteusz's and Tom van der Zanden's answers, but I would add a bit more detail. Generally, the differences are minimal, however: Generally speaking, a 1.75 mm filament will make it easier to use a smaller nozzle diameter (<0.4 mm), allowing for more precise prints in some cases. 1.75 mm filament will ...


15

The biggest effect I've see on resolution is due to plastic stress due to thermal gradients. The higher resolution prints build up more layers of material, and each layer has a cumulative effect on thermal stress. The upper layers pulling up more as they cool, and the lower layers curling up more strongly as the layer count is increased. To counteract ...


14

(source: all3dp.com) Your printer is skipping steps in the y-direction. This can have several causes. Take a look into Shifted layer guide on RapRap.org which lists 29 possible problems that can cause this issue and how to fix them. First items of the list: Driver current is too low Driver current is too high Belt too Loose Belt too Tight Loose Set Screw/...


14

1) Smaller nozzle advantage: sharper "corners" (higher X and Y resolution) 2) Larger nozzle advantage: faster 3d printing (because you can print the shell faster as each perimeter can be thicker so you'll need less perimeters to be printed to get the same shell thickness. Same true for infill). 3) Smaller nozzle disadvantage (varies, debatable): higher ...


14

This is a good question to make a comparison table. All-metal hotends Vs. PTFE liner hotends. All metal: Works well for high (+250ºC) temperatures filaments like nylon or PC. No need to replace the PTFE liner (pretty obvious). Retraction performs worse. Plastic can get stuck to the inner walls. This can lead to clogging, more likely when changing from ABS ...


13

First of all, not all hairsprays work. The chemicals in hairspray that causes the bonding is "VA/Crotonates Copolymer", it is also called "vinyl acetate/crotonic acid copolymer". Most commonly known as PVA, which is also a filament used as water soluble support material. This is a synthetic polymer created from monomers. When heated to a ...


12

well... it's hard to imagine printing M3 or even M4 I haven't try but I haven't because I'm pretty sure it's not possible (on my printer of course) but some time ago I've tried M8 which is of course way from your needs it was printed on 0.1mm layer height it went ok into the nut without any problems but the strength is not very high I suppose I know the ...


12

There's not a simple answer to this question, or if there is, it's "no". However the situation is a lot more complicated. When printer specs cite accuracy like this, they're usually basing the claim on the nominal size of the smallest movements on each axis by one "microstep" of the stepper motors. There's a great article on Hackaday explaining the how this ...


11

You could modify it as shown in my picture. I added lines tangent to the 11mm circle and in this example I set them to a 40 degree overhang which should be fine, the top line is also tangent to the circle and in my experience it's easier to bridge a small section rather than do a bunch of small overhangs like an arc would do. You still end up with quite a ...


11

I think (as do a lot of others) that the differences are rather minor. So just my 2 things I know from experience. We've been using 3 mm for some years and now we are moving towards 1.75. 1.75 mm filament is very easy to entangle, especially, if it is not on spool. You can even easily create knots on the filament and it is very hard to untangle. As long as ...


11

In my experience, the most common reason for positional offset during printing, is the motor skipping steps due to physical impact. Your stepper motors do not give positional feedback to your printer. So, if you forcefully move your motor during print, then the printer will not notice, and simply pretend it never happened. In particular, the motor could ...


10

Different types of hotends and extruders can lead to different problems associated with clogging. Based on my personal experience the leading causes of clogs and jams are the following Foreign material in the nozzle (dirt, dust, low quality filament) Mixing materials in the hotend (running ABS at 220 then switching to PLA without purging the nozzle) ...


10

The thinnest wall your printer can print is determined by its nozzle size, and will be a little thicker than that nozzle size. A great challenge when dealing with thin, hollow cylinders is that the cross-section has very little surface area and it can delaminate easily, especially if the tube is long. You could try printing the tube with a very thick ...


9

PET(G) is a strong contender. It is very strong and water-resistant, and as such is often used to make pop bottles. PLA has a reputation for being "biodegradable" and therefore it is often discouraged to use PLA outside and/or in contact with water. However, PLA only biodegrades under very specific conditions which it won't generally be exposed to so it can ...


9

Here's just a few of the things you might want to look into. plastic - some plastic types are more stringy than others and there's also variation between brands and colors. moisture in filament - water turning to steam tends to cause the extruder to ooze when it isn't printing, which can cause stringing. temperature - too hot or too cold can cause ...


9

I think a lot of this depends on the slicing engine you're using as to what options you have. I use MakerWare (now MakerBot Desktop) which has many options for the support scaffolding as well as other useful settings for your situation. As someone else stated, adjusting the distance (even slightly) can make a world of difference in how easy the supports are ...


9

One of the things I was told about was that many printers don't necessarily have that crazy precision of 0.05 mm (50 micron). Another person told me something different - he said most of those printers actually were capable of putting out 50 micron layer height. How is it really? Both things you've read are completely correct. Most printers are capable of ...


8

There are a few different approaches I've seen which you could look into. The easiest and most common is multiple extruders, each with a different color of thermoplastic. Tools like Pronterface and Slic3r have built-in support for multiple extruders. With multiple extruders you can get one color per extruder; there's no clear way to mix colors and get a ...


8

I use the glue stick method. I like to take my build plate out and put it in the freezer. The different coefficients of thermal expansion between the glass and plastic usually means that the part just pops off in the freezer.


8

You can put pretty much any controller in pretty much any printer, with a few noteworthy details you need to keep in mind for a Replicator 1. Makerbots use thermocouples. Most RepRap style 3d printers use thermistors. So you would need to replace the extruder temp sensors, or choose a new controller with thermocouple support. Makerbots use 24v heaters and ...


8

Cool environmental conditions are the single biggest contributor to ABS delamination. Delamination or edge/corner cracking is caused by warping stresses when the first layer adhesion is stronger than the interlayer bonding. Or it happens when the heated build plate allows a strong non-warping foundation to be built until the print is too tall to be ...


8

Replacing the nozzle depends on many things, the nozzle material (copper/brass, steel, hardened steel, Olsson Ruby Nozzle), the type of filament you print, how frequently you use the 3D printer. To replace a nozzle, there are probably a few reasons for doing so. A nozzle can wear out (see: How to identify nozzle wear; not only from the friction of ...


7

Here are the methods of printing with multiple colors that I'm aware of (from the most common to the rarest): Print each color separately and the assembly/glue them together - this isn't technically multicolor printing but this I the most common solution since most printers aren't multi-color Multiple extruders, one for each color - this is by far the ...


7

The problem is that it's almost impossible to answer the PLA/ABS question just by looking at the material characteristics as it is so dependent on the application and even the specific object you're printing. The decision guide in this infographic covers the following points that usually should be involved when deciding between ABS and PLA: Ventilation - I ...


7

A couple things to consider: Ensure that your build plate is flat and level. An un-parallel HBP could result in the object "welding" to the raft. Turn down your nozzle temperature. It is likely that the material is hotter than it needs as it is extruding. This results in a slower "cool-down rate". So, if it takes longer for the filament to cool between the ...


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