7

Design a different connection to the shaft, however I don't know of any Use a shaft/flange coupler to be fastened to your shaft and to your printed part. Without knowing the length of the shaft, you could connect a flange/coupler to design this into your gear. This is a good solution if you have to transmit larger torques. See e.g. this pulley that ...


4

A filament made of pure plastic won't be abrasive. The abrasion comes from the added particles. Filaments with added particles of any kind (there are not so many after all: glass/carbon fibres, metals, glow in the dark, wood, stone) will usually be always be advertised as such because they always carry a higher price tag compared to the plain plastic, ...


3

If you're thinking of changing materials, you're looking at the wrong parameters. PLA has a higher hardness than either PETG or ABS, but hardness isn't what you want. The problem you're experiencing is creep, where a material flows in response to pressure. Of the common printing plastics, PLA is by far the most susceptible to creep. Either ABS or PETG ...


3

You are looking for a filament that does not bond to wood glue, or as weak as possible. You misunderstand how wood glue "bonds" to plastics: Wood glue is typically PVA. It bonds to wood and paper by seeping into them before curing and hardening. The mesh of the glue entangles fibers of the wood/paper and itself, bonding with not only the exposed ...


3

A good option would be to use a (set-)screw to press against the flat of the motor shaft, similar to how pulleys are mounted on stepper motors.


3

ABS is less brittle compared to PLA. Strength and impact resistance are not the same. For the same Volume and Shape, I get more tensile strength (can apply a larger force without breaking) from steel than rubber. I can however pound the rubber with a hammer many more times than the steel before I break it. When it comes to impact (finite energy but ...


3

PEEK may well be the strongest filament out there (and it has other interesting properties to recommend it), but it is very difficult to print and requires a printer designed to operate at high temperatures. If you are still using PLA, your next port of call should be PETG. It is a lot stronger than PLA (although it will shatter if hit hard enough) and it is ...


3

Some of these questions could be answered by asking manufacturers for MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets), aka. SDS (Safety Data Sheets). Under EU laws in place since 2008 any substance shipped into the EEA (European Economic Area) in quantities of more than 1 tonne/year, whose composition contains more than 0.1% by weight of a compound identified in the ...


2

Polyoxymethylene (POM) filament (known as Delrin or acetal) is suited to applications involving chemicals: it is chemically resistant to solvents, hydrocarbons, and neutral chemicals.


2

I would recommend PETG - only because it is structurally similar to the plastic used in the bottles that last forever, and most PETG is food grade - implying that its chemical stability should be reasonably good...


2

If making your own caps ends up being the best solution, TPU (thermoplastic polyurethane) is probably your best bet. I don't have specific information on printed TPU filament and ozone, but TPU is widely regarded as one of the most chemical-resistant materials you can easily print with, and this page by Ozone Solutions rates polyurethane (no mention of ...


2

There are already some questions about the choice of filaments for outdoor use: Which is more durable to sunlight/weather - PLA, ABS or PETG 3d printing for outdoor use: what types of filament are most weather resistant? PLA use outdoors? It may very well be that if you print in PETG you won't need any postprocessing. If you still want to, you could try to ...


2

Considering my experience, SOME nylons don't bond to PVA at all. I tried at 70 °C and 110 °C and my nylon print can be pulled out from it manually with almost no resistance. It's however difficult to know which type of nylon, since I used a trimmer line of unknown composition (except that it should be mainly nylon).


1

This depends on application. Definitions: Vicat softening point. Vicat softening temperature or Vicat hardness is the determination of the softening point for materials that have no definite melting point, such as plastics. It is taken as the temperature at which the specimen is penetrated to a depth of 1 mm by a flat-ended needle with a 1 mm² circular or ...


1

PLA filaments are pretty transparent in their pure state. Other filaments, especially fiber-filled ones, are opaque in nature. But in the end, the color is determined a lot by the colorful pigments added and the amount of pigments directly correlates to the opacity. The more pigment is added, the more opaque it becomes. There are several screws for the color ...


1

Most of the plastics used for filament are inherently transparent and largely colorless. Color is achieved by adding pigment. Translucent and transparent colors are easy, but opaque colors require large amounts of opaque pigments, and even then, their opacity has its limits - even with black filament! You can probably find very opaque white filament, but ...


1

I know this is an old question, but CNC Kitchen just recently did a review of PLA+ and the mechanical properties of one brand, and found it far weaker than plain PLA, but with failure modes that might be mord graceful/preferable for some applications. In short, it stretched and tore rather than snapping.


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