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20

Food safety is a property of both the process and the material. You can't stick food-safe material in a printer that has previously been used to print something food-dangerous and expect the result to be food safe. The only way to know if a given material is food-safe is to ask your supplier, but a lot depends on how you then process it. For instance, FDM ...


11

Update: I found a nice article about chocolate printing: https://all3dp.com/2/chocolate-3d-printer-all-you-need-to-know/ You are searching for chocolate extruder. I did not find one, which would fulfill all your requirements. You have to adapt each solution. Zmorph3d Liquid paste extruder https://zmorph3d.com/cake-and-chocolate-extruder/ According video ...


9

You cannot make a safe coffee cup using home FDM printers. There are no printable thermoplastics available to consumers/hobbyists that will reliably AND safely contain coffee/tea temperature beverages. Even though some plastics may appear mechanically suitable at first sight, there are long-term issues with using thermoplastics for elevated temperature ...


9

Food Contact Substances There are regulatory agencies in most developed countries that regulate food containers. In the USA, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates Food Contact Substances (FCS) which are materials that come into contact with food during production, manufacturing, storage, packing, and use. They have many lists of FCS which are ...


8

There are 3 things that might affect food safety of 3D printed objects: The filament - it's food safe only if it says so on the package (even if the plastic is not toxic you don't know about the color and other additives) The hotend - the hotend and nozzle may leak metals into the filament, you need something like a full stainless steel hothead. And finally,...


7

You cannot print edible models using a "standard" consumer 3D printer without first installing an "hot end" capable of depositing edible - normally thicker - substances as well as a suitable extruder mechanism. However, there are not necessarily any technical limitations in the electronics, software, slicers etc. in a typical printer that wouldn't allow ...


7

The biggest problem I see with using a Kossel (or any FDM printer) is that to print the mold directly you'd need a plastic with a low enough melting point you can print it and a high enough melting point you can bake it. From this list of filaments (which admittedly shows printing temperatures, not melting temperatures) Polycarbonate and Polycarbonate-ABS ...


7

I would say that FDM printing in general is out of the question for this task, ABS and PLA would both melt in the oven, and the grooves in the print from the FDM process would make it a nightmare to clean. My initial thought was an SLA printer ( $1000+ ) which uses a Photopolymer Resin hardened by a UV light, and based on its medical uses, I would think ...


7

Many manufactures list their filaments as being food safe, but I would not treat this as "gospel truth". Apparently, the FDA considers PETG to be safe for food contact, but they are probably thinking about injection-moulded and vacuum-formed parts. Unfortunately, an initial search of the FDA's website did not yield any definitive information. Even if a ...


6

As mentioned, FDM 3D printed parts are flawed for food service and prep use regardless of the material, because of the small gaps between lines where bacteria can grow, and because your printer isn't used in a way to keep it from introducing contaminants into otherwise clean material. However, there are some ways around this. Single-use I'm pretty ...


6

Food packaging needs to comply with regulations. One certification agency informing about these (and their service to certify for them) is TÜV Süd, another is SAI global. A summary of the GFSI can be found here. Inform yourself about the standards you wish to apply! The stack can not give legally binding answers. No The Ender 3 is not approved to produce ...


6

As others have pointed out, PLA isn't specifically not food safe, but materials that have been printed previously can contaminate the PLA. Additionally, anything 3D printed is extremely porous. Once a part is used for food, moisture and bacteria will accumulate in the pores, and can never be completely cleaned out, contaminating any food that contacts it. ...


5

You can, but that doesn't mean it's very easy. You don't have to buy a special printer, but you need a special extruder (such as http://www.structur3d.io/). Most of these systems can print anything with the consistency of Nutella. However, many parts of the printer may not be food safe. Another option (if you simply want 2d designs) is something like the ...


5

MakerBot Industries had a mod available for their early open source machines called the Frostruder. It was basically a syringe connected to your print head. I saw this in action at the University of Washington a long time ago. Check out the legacy ReplicatorG in action! I like to relate 3D printing as "A hot glue gun on rails". The beauty is that a lot of ...


5

In general, PLA is known as a "food safe" filament, especially Natural PLA. However, filament suppliers have different processes that may detriment the food safe quality. Doing a little digging, I found an article on the M3D site which mentions the following about their filament All of our products, including our filaments are made from 100% non-toxic ...


5

Only certain plastics are safe enough to be used to contain or manipulate food. ABS and PET-G are such materials. The 3d printing process however is not food safe because, it creates crevices in the printed part into which bacteria and other contaminants can cling to. A printed part would need to be coated in a silicone rubber to render the surface both ...


4

I would say PLA itself should not be heated up by microwave. It's because microwave oven creates oscilations which excites water particles (see microwave explanation here) so assuming PLA doesn't contain water, it won't heat up. (removed to not mislead as the water is not only material which heats up by microwaves. Thanx to Tom van der Zanden for being ...


4

In principle, ABS is safe for contact with (cold or room-temperature) food. The two main concerns specific to 3D printing are, assuming you start with a filament that is not itself contaminated: Pores and holes in the printed part which may harbor bacteria Impurities introduced into the plastic during the printing process I doubt that the silicone mold ...


4

According to kmac-plastics, PETG is stable at temperatures below 50°C specifically for citric acid (also acetic acid) and others on the linked list. It is also safe with diesel oil and many alcohols. The list is illuminating with respect to the variation of tested compounds.


4

I also print coffee mugs. I have used ABS for a long time, and, given the statements here and elsewhere about bacterial growth sites, have been attaching my life to a thread. That's fine for me, but I don't make mugs for anyone else. There are three areas of concern I've found so far: The plastic may be toxic, The machine itself, especially the nozzle, ...


3

Given the tendancy for extrusion 3D prints to be porous, aside from any potential health/ingestion issues, I'd recommend lining your pots after printing. You could use an epoxy that's food-rated, or a thin layer of concrete, or even sheet metal if you have access to a bender (or aluminum foil, for that matter). So far as temperature-dependent outgassing, ...


3

I printed some pots for sprouting seedlings this year from PLA. A square array of pots with tiny drainage holes in the bottom. The array filled the bed of a Prusa3d i3m3. The seeds sprouted, except for the ground cherries, which I think failed because the seeds were bad. I had good germination rates for tomatoes and basil. According to the FDA, ABS is ...


3

The controller interface board (that being the RAMPS 1.4 you ask about) should be up to the task and not care WHAT it's printing. You'll probably be creating your own hotend design to pull this off, and if you make it open source, then it will be. I'm envisioning stainless steel, careful temperature control, lots of mixing, perhaps some sort of screw-feed ...


3

Don't try to bake cookies inside a plastic mold; the plastic will smoke even if not melt. If you need to bake cookies use a cookie cutter made of plastic (your own design or copy) obviously printed on your new printer then bake normally. here is a link from thingeverse to get a cookie cutter .stl file :) enjoy cutting cookies these holidays Here is another ...


3

I have looked at this a lot, both from the standpoint of my own use, and of selling items on Etsy. As far as I can determine, PLA and ABS are both generally safe. The FDA lists ABS and PLA as safe plastics for food contact, although some pigments and additives can bring their own problems. ABS is nit generally safe (per the FDA) for contact with alcohol. ...


3

Regardless of whether the actual filament you are printing is marked as Food Safe by the provider, remember that actually printing the filament might contaminate it. If you previously have printed a toxic filament on your printer, you cannot be sure no remains of that filament are deposited onto the model. Equally, I believe very few printers only consist ...


2

Having performed a quick search through all the resources at the FDA Food Contact Substance resource, I cannot find PLA in any list except an occasional notification that a specific manufacturer has obtained approval for use in specific circumstances, with the notice that such notifications are only valid for that manufacturer and cannot be used to validate ...


2

Answer was moved to this question: Which are the food-safe materials and how do I recognize them?


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There is a huge difference between "Certified food -safe" and "is actually perfectly safe for you to use at home" . – Carl Witthoft Sep 18 '18 at 14:54 Regarding certified food safe I point to Ender 3 is capable of food safe printing? - you probably can't get the certification with a 3D printer, but, as Carl said, you might manage a pretty safe at home. So ...


2

Resin basics Resins are tricky, but probably less tricky than FDM as the manufacturing process is much less likely to include contaminants in the shape of contaminated air, particles, or adding lead into the print. This is all due to the whole process of creating the polymer happening under the protection of the resin, which in its monomeric liquid state is ...


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