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1

The answer is highly depending on the programming skills of the programmer, but in theory, if all pieces of software exist, they can either be tied together in a workflow process (automated) or directly programmed into a new tool.


2

TL;DR - The problem would appear to be that some of the steps require a bit of manual tinkering in order to complete them successfully - it isn't just a simple question of conversion. So, no (not currently). Also, whilst writing this answer, it dawned on me that unless someone has actually managed to automate the whole process already, then your question may ...


2

The simple way to do this is to slice a very long print (near maximum volume should run to 24 hours or longer, anyway), but set your slicer to nozzle temp of 0 °C and extrusion flow rate of zero. Back the filament out of the hot end (in case you want to change before resuming actual printing), but you can leave it in the extruder and Bowden tube so ...


1

Based on @John Mecham's comprehensive answer, I whipped up a quick proof of concept. In the image below, the left arrow (top) is the original and the right arrow (bottom) is the reversed clone. Cura does generate a little relative offset code at the end, I think I handled it correctly. import re data_start = re.compile('^;LAYER_COUNT:[0-9]+') ifilename = '...


2

If your slicer does not have a mirror operation or a scale that allows negative values then mirroring in the G-code should be straightforward. As long as your printer doesn't have certain specific tool change or homing or purge positions that are done in the G-code you can just transform it, otherwise you would want to skip these sections and just do the ...


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