14

The following is a compilation of the input from a number of sources. Linear rails in general are mechanical components that - when designing equipment - offer great flexibility. The profile of the rail can be designed in nearly infinite ways. This in turn allows for: Different levels of stiffness in different directions (for example you may have stresses ...


12

This is highly dependent upon the type and quality of filament you use. Exotic materials such as wood, metalic, or otherwise infused plastics can potentially wear out the inside of the nozzle and at the very least leave deposits of composite material in the nozzle. This can lead to more frequent or irreversible clogs. You may also notice your prints ...


8

Here's the pattern. The problem is, you didn't slice the g-code using support. It won't print right without it.


7

Unfortunately, the answer isn't as simple as that a specific size of SD card works and another size doesn't. The Marlin firmware wiki mentions: The SD- or MMC- Card must be formatted as FAT and must have a MMC interface. This is more likely with cards <= 2 GB. MMC is the predecessor of SD. SD cards are not necessarily fully backwards compatible ...


6

If the outside of the bushing will bond well to the epoxy, your method is simple and likely to be effective. You could use the same method used for threaded inserts by roughing the exterior of the bushing, heating it and forcing it into a correctly sized hole printed in the model. The threaded inserts are knurled or otherwise textured to provide stronger ...


6

It's extremely unlikely that belt tension is actually your problem. I've never heard of anyone using a gauge to measure their belt tension. Typically you just pull your belt tight by hand so that it produces a low note when plucked. It's far more likely that you're experiencing shifts due to too high or too low stepper current. Unless your belt is so loose ...


6

It's a garbage-quality belt, and it will probably continue outgassing at a steadily-decreasing rate for a very long time. The fact that it has a strong chemical smell is pretty good evidence that it would not comply with regulations in civilized countries (such as REACH). I would recommend returning it or throwing it away and buying from a more reputable ...


5

I have the Anet A8, I confirm the threads are Tr8x8(p2). This is explained as "Tr" for trapezoidal thread followed by the nominal diameter in mm. The digits after the "x" denotes the lead of the screw (how much does the nut advance per revolution). The value between the brackets "p2" denotes the pitch. This means that the screw has 8 (lead) / 2 (pitch) = 4 ...


4

You could cut a v-notch groove in a piece of plywood to hold one side of the groovemount neck, and then use a bolt through another piece of wood to push the neck into the V-notch. There are lots of options when building RepStraps and JunkStraps. Really depends on what sort of hardware and fabrication capabilities you have on hand.


3

There are lots of online sources for T-slot aluminum extrusions from ebay to McMaster. If you want more options do a Google Search.


3

For an easy test, try manually pulling the filament through the U-loop of guide tube. How hard is it to pull through? It should only take 1-2 lbs of tension at most. Then do a "tug test" on the extruder. Start it loading and grab the filament by hand to try to stop it from extruding. The Replicator 1/2/2x extruder style can typically pull ~8-10 lbs of ...


2

If you do not have the tools to fabricate this component yourself, but have a 3D model available, I would suggest getting someone else to 3D print it for you. There are multiple options for getting your model printed, such as: Friends Your local makerspace, library or similar 3D Hubs MakeXYZ Shapeways Sculpteo and so on.. Good luck!


2

I ended up buying a TronXY X3 and have had it several months. I have seen several videos on the P802 and the X3 so I believe I can answer this question fairly. Here is what the two printers look like P802 X3 Here is a comparison of the features Here are my overall impressions: Both printers are kits and have their assembly challenges The X3 is ...


2

Auto-leveling is a great effort saver and a best thing in 3D printing in the last 10 years. While you can go without it, and many people do, it reduces the number of failed prints you will have at the beginning. Properly leveled bed allows you to print without using any adhesive in it, improves you performance with ABS and other stubborn things. Don't skip ...


2

It's not quite as simple as you would suggest. You can't just recompile Marlin for another device. You'd need to rewrite large parts of it. It may be compatible with the Arduino IDE, but that doesn't mean you can just run firmware intended for the AtMega2560 on it. All the timings (e.g. those of the pulses sent to the stepper motors) would be off, if you ...


2

I don't own the printer, but the intertubes identify it as a "TR8X8 T" (8mm diameter / 8mm offset per revolution).


2

I highly recommend the Bosch Rexroth series of aluminum hardware. I also recommend RS components as a distributor for this material. They have local warehouses, and provide very fast shipping. Here is the part you are looking for on their UK GB website. Here is an assortment of compatible hardware. By the way, RS components has a Ukraine website, where ...


2

Not surprisingly, your question is a difficult one to pin down in a precise manner. I'm going to pull one line from your post as the focus for my answer. I would like to get use of your experience with 3D printers and their producer brands I would suggest that you isolate a few models (or more) that hold your interest. A good example of a popular, ...


2

If you can measure the voltage at the main board where the bed power line is attached, or at the last point in the wiring prior to the connector, then measure the voltage at the bed, you can compare the difference to determine if there is loss related to a failing connector. One certain indication of a failing connector is to separate the components of the ...


2

Hanging up the Bowden system won't fix the problems with printing flexible filament: the filament will still press into the bends of the tube and thus lead to under extrusion. Another issue is, that the flexible filament can compress - and the longer way it has to the melt-zone, the more filament it can "store" on the way to it. These bunched up zones will ...


2

The "click of death" is the feed bolt skipping as it chews a bite out of your filament. Your filament feed is encountering resistance and the feed bolt is slipping. I've seen that sad spaghetti so many times. After unclogging your head with a cold pull and cutting off the mangled filament, you'll have some things to try: I had a Lulzbot with the older ...


2

I had a similar issue after installing an E3D V6 using a Bowden extruder. PLA needs a heat break that has a PTFE liner, since with all metal heat breaks, it's probable that the filament will reach glass transition temperature in the heat break and stop flowing properly. Also, I had filament that was 1.86 mm instead of 1.75 mm, which caused it to ...


1

Print recovery can be achieved by changing the firmware. Here is some information on how to do that: Marlin documentation Also, this another stackoverflow post about that: Stackoverflow Post


1

Generally: nozzles are not changed, the whole tool head is While "tool change" is easy to implement in a G-code and could be easily adapted in the firmware, there are several practical issues to hot-swapping nozzles without swapping the whole hotend assembly: The hotend is a fluid-dynamic system that needs to be sealed to operate under pressure ...


1

I tried, by instrumenting code, to know where/when the temp bed is modified. I found that it is called in the gcode M81 when starting the print. Wait M81? isn't it M80 to switch on the PSU? What I did in fact was both wiring this up side down and mixing M80 with M81. But what I didn't know is that M80 and M81 are not strictly opposite functions. Indeed, ...


1

If the connector or the wires are hot, you have a severe problem. The heat of a high-resistance connection encourages additional oxidation and corrosion, which escalates the problem. If the wires do not get warmer as they approach the connector, you don't have a problem, at least not yet. If the wires get warmer as you approach the connector, you probably ...


1

Unless the connector has already started failing - by getting warm, creating a voltage drop, eventually melting away -, you will have to remove the shrink tubing near it. Earlier batches had the connection crimped by the supplier of the cables, which is wrong. XT60 connectors should always be soldered to.


1

Not precisely cheap, but if you look on aliExpress for AM8 3D Printer Extrusion Metal Frame you will find kits build precisely for moving Anet A8 to aluminium frame


1

People are using this to tighten the belt but I would totally agree with @Tom - there is no need to use such devices or gauges and your problem lies in stepsticks current. It would be also problem with endstops so PCB doesn;t know it's time to stop :)


1

I have a few hundred printing hours on a Monoprice Dual Extrusion, which is essentially the same thing. I've had a couple random issues that lead to filament stripping by the extruder motor: Clogs (either a buildup of material over time, or from over-retraction) Filament kinks around the spool holder Some other restriction of the spool's rotation I ...


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