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22

There is very little information about safety available, as home 3D printers are relatively new. However, plastics such as ABS have a long history in making plastic products, and a study found that at traditional manufacturing methods (such as injection molding and hot wire cutting) do not release dangerous levels of carcinogens and/or respiratory ...


17

Almost all 3D printers have issues that could cause health problems. FDM/FFF printers heat plastic to a temperature that may cause it to off-gas, and these byproducts may not be healthy. SLA printers often use epoxies that may off-gas, or may be somewhat toxic prior to being cured. Powder based printers can also off-gas, in addition to the powder itself ...


15

You are probably pretty safe printing PLA Regarding emissions, the following recent report, Emissions of Ultrafine Particles and Volatile Organic Compounds from Commercially Available Desktop Three-Dimensional Printers with Multiple Filaments, indicates that PLA is a pretty low emitter (1/20th of nylon) and most of what it out-gasses is Lactide which is low ...


12

Fire is the most obvious risk - firmware can now detect some of the more obvious failure modes such as a detached thermistor, but loose or failing connections can still overheat. A smoke alarm is a fairly obvious (but not necessarily effective) protective measure. The risk from particulates in particular is probably low, but marginal health risks like this ...


12

I found much the same question at Does PLA outgas? An answer there pointed to a NASA outgassing database, Outgassing Data for Selecting Spacecraft Materials, and says that: ABS (unknown supplier), MakerGeeks PET and Makerbot PLA have been measured and are listed in the NASA database. Poster there recommended PLA for lower outgassing, and clear PLA ...


11

Almost all of the FDM materials outgas even at normal atmospheric pressure, and, in fact, most plastics outgas. Further, FDM and many other printing processes do not guarantee no internal voids - meaning that putting a 3D printed object into a vacuum may result in breakage, cracking, and possible explosion hazards. For this reason I would focus only on SLA,...


10

I am going to address the air issue as it is currently unresolved. the third dimension offers a great answer for common safety issues. The short answer is that based on our limited knowledge at this point, there may be imperceptible health hazards related to FDM / FFF printers and therefore additional safety precautions are, in my opinion, necessary and not ...


7

At the time of this writing (March 2019), I don't think theres any study on the health effects of nanoparticles emmitted by 3D Printers. The general consensus seems to be right now that those particles are potentially harmful, as they build up in the lungs, and therefore precautions should be taken. The reason why nobody has yet determined if and how ...


7

If it's one-time-use, both ABS and PLA are perfectly safe for use as a cookie cutter. The "food safety" of 3D printed parts is fairly controversial. In fact, whether any particular material is approved by regulators (such as the US FDA) for food contact is much more complex than most people realize. Materials can be accepted for some uses and not others. ...


6

As others have pointed out, PLA isn't specifically not food safe, but materials that have been printed previously can contaminate the PLA. Additionally, anything 3D printed is extremely porous. Once a part is used for food, moisture and bacteria will accumulate in the pores, and can never be completely cleaned out, contaminating any food that contacts it. ...


6

Polycarbonate is heat-resistant up to ~120C. Above this temperature it will gradually become flexible and may irreversibly bend. It will not generate any toxic fumes all the way up to ignition temperature (630C), because it's fumes are not considered harmful. Note though, that with your temperature limit you may not be able to print with polycarbonate, or ...


5

This naturally depends on the ultimate pressure you require. I have made a few tests with LEGO pieces (ABS) in vacuum and reached 10-5 mbar without problems. I did not try to go any lower. Otherwise, have a look here: A 3D printed beam splitter for polar neutral molecules. A Formlabs Stereolithography machine was used there, producing a material that ...


5

Apart from the inherent process itself and direct health hazards from that, many 3D printers also require some complementary technology to work. fdm printers have a printing head that needs to move around in 3D space. Moving machinery parts can be a hazard. In a home/hobbyist environment with children for example, I would recommend to buy a printer with a ...


4

There are printers designed for medical use, and the manufacturers supply them with varying levels of certification and testing, however I've not seen a filament manufacturer certify their material as bio-compatible separate from the printer. The printing process changes the material slightly in the best case (and significantly with poor temperature control ...


4

You ask about "filament", so I assume you expect fused-filament technologies. These are however not accurate enough, besides being prone to gaps and crevices which are problematic in crowns. The smallest viable nozzle, 0.2 mm, is still too rough for that. Dental 3D printers need to be very accurate, so the most common technologies used are ...


3

I have been printing daily for 2 months with PLA and have noticed respiratory problems! I feel like slight pneumonia symptoms! I also have very sensitive lungs that react to things that would not bother normal people.


3

Regardless of whether the actual filament you are printing is marked as Food Safe by the provider, remember that actually printing the filament might contaminate it. If you previously have printed a toxic filament on your printer, you cannot be sure no remains of that filament are deposited onto the model. Equally, I believe very few printers only consist ...


2

For anything where there is an open or bandaged wound, you should NOT use 3D printing, and should use sterilized medical equipment to prevent infection and heavy metals infiltrating the bloodstream. SLA/SLS 3D printing may be the best option for replicating the complex structure of the splint you have pictured above, as FDM printers have difficulty ...


2

All plastics have two temperatures to consider for operation and evaluation: Melting point = the temperature that plastics starts to get soft; this can be considered for maximum temperature operation. Flow temperature = normally used for molding process and this have a wide range of temperatures depending on PPM´s and mixtures to meet a purpose like coffee ...


2

Having performed a quick search through all the resources at the FDA Food Contact Substance resource, I cannot find PLA in any list except an occasional notification that a specific manufacturer has obtained approval for use in specific circumstances, with the notice that such notifications are only valid for that manufacturer and cannot be used to validate ...


2

At work, I put a 3d ABS part printed via 3d hubs (5*20*30), in the chamber at 1 mbar. No signs of breakage what so ever. No signs of sudden leaks. Going anywhere below 1mbar, i.e., to 10^-infinity mbar, I think should theoretically still not cause any breakage or sudden leaks, as the expected mechanism of failure depends on the pressure difference; i.e., [...


2

Having asthma, I'm very sensitive to air quality and when i first started 3D printing i quickly noticed a sore throat, feeling out of breath, headaches and well the smell. One thing many beginners overlook is material oozing out of the extruder in places other than the nozzle itself. This causes a dirty extruder head which 'burns' that material and thus ...


1

There are several ways to be injured with a 3D printer. The biggest threats come from the printer running under normal conditions. The uncommon, exceptional, and difficult to quantify threats come from fire and fumes. For fire, consider the 3D printer to be like any other 400W heating appliance in your house, with the advantage compared to, say, a ...


1

Check where the moving cables (especially for the heaters) are bending. The bending radiuses should be as wide as possible and connections or soldering points should never see any direct force from movement. Add a strain reliev if there are any such connenctions to prevent them from failing over time and possibly melting down.


1

Technically, you should never leave your printer running unattended. Printer fires are rare, but it can happen, especially with cheap printers with poor quality control. Personally, I would just make sure that there is a fire alarm near by, so you'd be alerted if there was a fire. Also, the fumes concern is valid in the sense that you don't want to sleep in ...


1

Perhaps FDM 3D printing does emit nanoparticles during the process of printing, but the syllogism does not prove it or even suggest it. Parenthetically, your headline is not actually addressed by the body of your question. As an answerer, I have been misled by other questions which seemed clear enough from the headline, but where the question body ...


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