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Using an Ender 3 for high temperature materials is possible but you need to enclose it to be able to heat the air up to 100 °C. It's quite involved and it would be much better, if it's something you do seldomly, to have the parts printed professionally. Many thing start warping or breaking at 100 °C.


2

If you power the printer and it starts heating up the hotend, it most probably is caused by a faulty controller board. More specific, the MOSFET (as in an electronic switch component) controlling the current to the heater element is causing this. MOSFET devices usually fail short-circuit implying that when the MOSFET has failed, the current can freely run to ...


2

PEEK (poly ether ether ketone) has a glass transition temperature of 145 ‎°C (293 °F). Melting temperature 345 ‎°C (653 °F) Nozzle temperature 370 - 410 ‎°C Heated bed 120 - 150 ‎°C Polycarbonate has a glass transition temperature of about 147 °C (297 °F) Polypropylene has a glass transition temperature is 215 °C Polymaker PolyMide CoPA (specialized Nylon)...


1

I was experiencing similar issues on my Raise3D Pro2Plus. I've printed near 20 small cylinders to try and fine-tune the settings to get densities that are close to the theoretical density and right now am sitting comfortably around 80 %. Here is what I've found Temperature of the build plate and extruder have had a large effect on the quality of the print (...


1

The easiest step would be to add some isolation on the outside of the box. If you have space inside, there might be a good spot to store some non-flammable insulation, for example rock or glassfiber wool. A different material might also be possible - firebrick is not only non-flammable but also a very good insulator! about 2-3 inches of firebrick can contain ...


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You could CAD a 1 layer thick cylinder, and add it to your print and place it around your object. You can create any number of cylindrical shells that way...


1

The print is extremely challenging, as it has a lot of thin diameter items growing up, a lot of overhangs and a rather small surface to hold to the bed. So you need a Brim and support: As OP found, a Brim is a setting that adds extra material in the first layer around the print to increase adhesion. Support Structures are to give an overhang something to ...


1

in a printer abrasive filament You probably are using an abrasive filament. The most loss on abrasive filament happens when the nozzle runs over the printed material as it extrudes and less from the bore itself. As a result, the nozzles get ground up from the tip. How carbon-fiber filled PLA grinds away nozzles can be seen on this page of the Olsson Ruby ...


1

Your extruder nozzle will wear from the inside out if you are using abrasive filaments, which include carbon fiber, wood type filaments, glow-in-the-dark and many other types. Because they are abrasive, removing material from the inside also thins the cone shape of the outside (point) of the nozzle. The solution is to not use abrasive filaments, or to use a ...


1

E3D themselves specify this on the product page: Our high precision heater cartridges feature a rounder cartridge with more consistent diameter and surface quality, ensuring greater surface area contact with the heater block for more reliable heat transfer. With the quick change principle in mind, the high precision heater cartridge uses a Molex Microfit 3....


1

Your temperature is not just bumping up 10 °C. Your hotend is fluctuating in temperature, it drops under and increases over the "set" temperature. The hotend temperature is a result of the amount heat you put into it and how much heat you pull from it (e.g. filament heats up and draws energy from the heater block), apart from a too large printing ...


1

If it's a printer stock, no modifications, obviously you don't need to change the hot end, Creality did not release a printer without testing it. At least, no such extreme issues can be expected. Check the fan power, wear, and settings.


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