19

There are three reasons (I can think of): A large problem you'd face with allowing the bed to cool after first layer is you stand the chance of losing adhesion after it cools. When you heat the bed, it expands somewhat. When it cools it contracts. It has been known for parts to actually pop off the bed if left on there to cool (after a print). If you allow ...


18

There are many different approaches to solving this issue and most of the answers already are spot-on. However, the fundamental reason for the "warping" is incorrect and inconsistent temperature across the material. If there is too much fluctuation in the temperature across the object in this heated state can result in warping. The reason you see this ...


15

I believe printing directly on aluminium is unwise, simply because it will expand when heated, typically giving the bed a concave or convex shape. Glass, on the other hand, does not (at least not significantly). As pointed out in the comments below, the heat expansion of aluminium could potentially be mitigated by increasing the thickness of the bed, as ...


14

Heatbeds have two purposes: Increase surface energy of the print bed to improve bonding strength of the first layer (particularly important when using surfaces like PEI or Kapton) Keep the bottom few millimeters of the print hot enough to provide a warp-free foundation for the rest of the print. The bit about surface energy is straightforward. Most ...


11

No, this is not possible with most ATX power supplies. While in principle you can get a 24V supply by combining the +12V and -12V supplies, the rails are not symmetric, and the negative 12V supply is usually designed for a much lower load than the positive supply. In the example in the following picture, there are two positive 12V rails, capable of sourcing ...


10

What bed material cools faster? I found an extensive list which relates various materials to their thermal conductivity, k [W/mK]; the lower thermal conductivity, the better the material insulates, and the slower the print bed will resist changes in temperature - both heating up, and cooling down. Here are the thermal conductivity for some common ...


10

Most common problem with corners is to low temperature of heated bed. Set the heated bed temperature to 110°. If this will not help then try to set brim in your slicer. The problem can be cause by other issues. You can find additional tips in following Troubleshooting Guides: overheating (simplify3d: Print Quality Troubleshooting Guide) differential ...


10

Great material but very hard to print as it does not stick easy to the build plate as it has a low friction coefficient to grip onto the heated bed. Also, the material sets quite fast, once the filament leaves the nozzle, it soon hardens so you need to be careful with retraction and Z-hop (leaving small peaks that will be hit later by the nozzle knocking ...


9

When centered in the slicer correctly, without offsets defined in the slicer, the printer is most probably incorrectly configured! Luckily you can do something about that! Basically, you will have to calibrate the printer for a new center. Printer origin? First of all, the firmware determines where your origin of the printer is. This implies that you need to ...


9

I think you may have used the wrong substance to clean your bed. Try using Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA). You may have left some residue behind from the soap, which is now interfering with adhesion. When that is done, ensure you've gone through the steps for bed leveling again. It's amazing how much of a difference proper bed leveling makes in adhesion. If it ...


8

I use the glue stick method. I like to take my build plate out and put it in the freezer. The different coefficients of thermal expansion between the glass and plastic usually means that the part just pops off in the freezer.


8

Adding a manually added brim with a larger bulk at the corner extremities that you can cut off after printing should help. My larger prints come off the printer looking like tents with concrete weights tied to their corners. The 'weights' are attached to the print by very short a 2-3 layer (depending on print size) brim-like strip that makes them easy to ...


8

I would consider getting another aluminum build plate for the following reasons: Lightweight. Aluminum is a very lightweight metal, making it suitable for most machines that have injection molded platform arms. This reduces potential sagging of the arms and overall load on the -Z- axis stepper motor. Conductivity. Referring to this simple Google search for ...


8

It will be very difficult to heat such a large bed, simply because of the enormous power required. Thomas Sanladerer recommends at least 0.6 W/cm² but notes 0.4 W/cm² also works (but takes "forever" to reach the target temperature). For a 30"x30" bed, 0.6 W/cm² would come out to 3.5 kW. At 110 V that would require 32 A and at ...


8

What you purchased is probably a bed that can be configured for either 110V or for 220V, depending on how you hook up the wires: the bed contains two heating elements, hooking these up in parallel gives you the 110V version, hooking them up in series gives you the 220V one. If you attempt to use this bed with a 24V supply it won't work. The power dissipated ...


8

How about the Ultimaker clips? Ultimaker uses 2 mm heat bed and 4 mm glass, that should be within reach by bending the clips a bit. They have quite a low profile/footprint. These clamps are very cheap and can be found on those typical auction or Chinese sites. Alternatively, you can also tape the glass to the aluminium bed using kapton tape if ...


7

This is a common problem with ABS. You might prevent it by enclosing the printer inside a box/chamber - that will create a warmer environment and the extruded material will cool down more slowly, hence not creating such a tension. Other option is to use PLA instead if possible, the problem is not so significant with PLA.


7

It really doesn't quite have enough power to heat everything at once. Initially bringing the bed up to temp takes a lot of current and so Makerbot's start sequences decrease stepper current and hold off on heating the extruder(s) until the bed is preheated. Once preheated, the bed's power draw decreases to a lower "holding" level and there is available ...


7

Picture frame glass (generally float glass) will work well enough, but count on it eventually cracking/getting chipped. It's always very flat (due to the way the production process works). Taking it up to 100-110C for printing ABS should not be a problem, but you'll want to avoid sharp changes in temperature, and should be careful that your prints don't ...


7

Your best option may be to seek out a silicone rubber heating mat, using those terms for your web search. A quick search on my part shows many resources, some of which are known to the 3d printing manufacturing world, while others are equally suited for that purpose. Don't bond the heater to the glass. You'll need to replace it when it breaks. Consider to ...


7

I'll try to give it a shot as the other answer (perfectly sound answer b.t.w.) does explain "how" we use heated beds, but not "why" they are actually needed for good prints. Plastics or polymers are mostly amorphous (no macro crystalline structure) and usually relatively hard and brittle at low temperatures (this is referred to as "glassy"). By increasing ...


7

TL;DR Yes, glass warps when hot. Use a physical touch sensor and calibrate it out, or swap glass if it's "bad". The further you go into mechanical studies like 3d printing, mills, and lathes, you will find out that nothing is perfectly flat. Everything has a tolerance to it, whether the manufacturer provided it or not. Better manufacturers provide ...


7

It looks like your first layer is way too close to the bed. The printer is trying to squash the plastic down very thinly, resulting in inconsistent extrusion. You will likely see better results if you move the nozzle away from the bed a little bit. Increasing the thickness of the first layer might help as well (this is a setting in your slicer). Keep in ...


7

I suggest to look at a similar question, but just the glass question here: Glass is a very smooth surface Glass shrinks when cooling to a degree it pops the print free on itself Glass is virtually impossible to scratch with metal scrapers Glass stays fairly flat under heating Refurbishing of the bed isn't needed but for applying your adhesion solution (...


6

I moved to a plain glass heated bed with a brush applied acetone and ABS mixture. Using an old emptied nail polish bottle with brush, I added some acetone and then threw in ABS pieces until it reached a brush-able consistency. I then brush it on the glass build plate where I believe the print will occur, and it works very well. On removal of the part the ...


6

Some things I've tried that have helped: Lay down a layer of masking tape. Most people who do this use blue painter's tape. The plastic should stick nicely during printing, yet release reasonably easily when you remove the print from the heated bed. Lay down a later of Kapton tape. The principle is the same as masking tape, but Kapton tape has a smooth ...


6

3D printer get the temperature settings from g-code file. The firmware settings for min and max temperature are just safeguards. You should verify instructions within the g-code file. If you are not familiar with g-code, take a look to wikipedia. List of g-code instructions for marlin firmware is here. Instruction responsible for setting bed temperature ...


6

Because you will be printing on unheated glass, you will be using some form of adhesive material. If you use an off-the-shelf glue stick, you will likely find it is water soluble. If the bed is removable, immersing it in warm water for a relaxing soak will provide easier model removal. I don't have experience with various tapes, so will avoid ...


6

The answer is "No" you don't need a heated bed for PLA but it does make the base layer a little easier to lay down and also helps with print removal post print. PLA is a very easy filament to work with and the majority of PLA printers don't come with heated beds and suggest blue tape and/or elmers glue. You may find that if you are purchasing very cheap/...


6

It's not a bad idea, and you should try it. But only on prints with some height, because: The goal of the heated bed is to ensure adhesion for the first few layers. Without the heat on the bottom side of the layer, the layers above will pull those layers with it as they cool, causing the warp that you see. When your bed is warmer than the layers above, ...


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