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The inductive sensors work better when you apply a higher voltage than 5 V. Usually they are rated for 6-36 V, but please do check. To prevent frying your board when connecting the sensor to (12 or) 24 Volts you could optically isolate the 5 V and the (12 or) 24 V circuit with an OptoCoupler module: Image of an optocoupler module This ...


6

The issues/questions raised about the automatic bed leveling using e.g. a BLTouch probe at this stack require a more in depth description of the automatic leveling functionality in general, this answers aims on describing how this works. Definition of "bed leveling" Let us begin with saying that such sensors systems alone will never level your bed,...


6

No, it is not necessary to call G29 before every print to "auto level the bed" 1) provided that: the bed surface has not changed (e.g. large load or force has been exerted on the build platform, leveling screws are accidentally adjusted, a substantial different bed temperature is used causing different thermal stresses, etc.), the carriage of the ...


5

Your problem is that the hotend carriage does not stop when the sensor triggers. I assume you mean "on homing", not "while printing" (UPDATE: after watching the video it is confirmed that it is "on homing"). First, the working and this difference is explained. Thereafter your configuration file is assessed and typical errors or inconsistencies are reported. ...


4

TL;DR To answer your question how (by assuming you have a 4 pins PINDA v2 sensor) to connect the sensor to your board, you have 2 options: Do not connect the white wire and treat the sensor as you would use a normal endstop switch (blue is ground, brown is +5 V, black is signal), Connect the 4 wires (use a splitter cable to split out into a 3 and 1 pin ...


4

Another possibility is to create a voltage divider circuit. In electronics, a voltage divider (also known as a potential divider) is a passive linear circuit that produces an output voltage (Vout) that is a fraction of its input voltage (Vin). Voltage division is the result of distributing the input voltage among the components of the divider. A ...


2

Minimalist Solution The very simplest possible implementation is to use a single resistor(!) to protect the input pin, as described in this source. The AVR inputs are protected from over/under voltage by internal silicon diodes D1 and D2. The input resistor must be sized such that it will conduct no more than 1 mA when the internal clamping diode, D1, ...


2

Solved the problem, I was missing this line: #define ENDSTOPPULLUP_ZMIN_PROBE Apparently the sensor required a pull-up to better define the signal.


1

I discovered something which could be the answer to the problem, in Marlin compiling there is: //#define Z_AFTER_PROBING 2 // Z position after probing is done You have to uncomment it and change number 2 to how many millimeters you want it to be above the 3D printer bed.


1

Not knowing the type of inductive sensor you are using, the most common, an NPN type sensor (like the LJ18A3-8-Z/BX) is assumed (in relation to your previous question). NPN type sensors imply that the signal is held high at a certain voltage (the supply voltage ranges from 6 V-36 V, but are reported to work on 5 V also) and is actively switched down to 0 V ...


1

Both diagrams are exactly the same, the difference is the +5 V that is not connected on the bottom diagram (displayed in white, labelled "not used"), but since your endstops do not have a +5 V pin in the socket (only ground, GND, and signal, SIG or S) you don't need to attach it. You should source the +5 V from elsewhere from your board. As the ...


1

You can safely use the module with 24V. The input side shows a red LED, optocoupler and 1k resistor in series. The LED and optocoupler probably have a voltage drop in the neighbourhood of 3.1-3.5 V put together, so for a 12 V input you will get a current of approximately 9 mA-. For a 24 V input voltage the increased current will cause a ...


1

An NPN sensor is wired differently from a PNP sensor. The signal wire is the black wire, blue is the ground wire. According to this posting, Don’t trust the internet (and how to add an Inductive Proximity Sensor to your 3D printer the proper and easiest way, you need to insert a 6.8 kΩ resistor in between the black and the blue wire, I quote: ......


1

TL;DR Yes, a 2 kΩ resistor is sufficient to limit the current to about 12 mA through the optocoupler. With a maximum current specification of 60 mA you require at least 400 Ω; any resistor in between the values should be suitable for this optocoupler component when used at 24 V. More information is found below. Having a glass bed and using an inductive ...


1

The larger the diameter and the higher the voltage the larger the detection distance. You do not need to do much wire modification if you use an optocoupler, see this anwer.


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You should un-comment the following line to get rid of the Probing failed error message: // #define MIN_SOFTWARE_ENDSTOP_Z // Line # 0907 Commented to #define MIN_SOFTWARE_ENDSTOP_Z You have basically disabled the use of the minimum Z endstop, while in fact you are using one, the difference is that it is a sensor now, not a mechanical switch. Please ...


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