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28

From this reference you can read that: A gyroid is a naturally occurring structure which be found in butterfly wings and even within membranes inside cells. In 2017, MIT researchers discovered that when graphene was shaped into a gyroid structure, it had exceptional strength properties at low densities. They then discovered however, that the ...


24

This answer explains that you can have different infill within the same part. Firstly the implementation in Ultimaker Cura is described, secondly how you can do this in Slic3r. Ultimaker Cura I've used a feature in Ultimaker Cura that can be used to alter the infill density locally. What you need to do is load your model into Cura, then load other objects (...


21

0scar gave a great answer, but I wanted to add to it. Stefan of CNC Kitchen does a lot of 3D printer technique testing. He covered the gyroid and other patterns. While there's a difference in filament used, the significant differences are strength* and print speed. Here's his 8-minute infill pattern testing video; some screenshots follow. I stopped printing ...


14

This answer builds on to both 0scar and tedder42's answer: Martin's experiment was about shear strength, where as Stefan of CNC Kitchen's experiment was about compressive strength on 2 directions. From their experiments, it is reasonable to conclude that gyroid does well on sheer strength, and above mediocre on compressive strength. Why use gyroid? If ...


12

About a decade ago, we looked at the 'Gyroid infill structure' (which we called sheet solid). We looked at it as a linear-elastic solid and as possible bone scaffold design: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0142961211006776 What came out of that study that lots of the triply-periodic minimal surfaces (a broader class of structures that ...


11

Although the core of Slic3r is written in C++ a lot of other components such as infill generation are written in Perl. Since Slic3r is open source there is nothing stopping you from writing your own infill module in Perl and recompiling your own version of Slic3r. If your considering doing this you can find the existing infill code in the Github repository ...


8

I don't particularly recommend the following, but it may be easier than 0scar's answer (which I would recommend implementing if you use Cura). Slice your object twice, once at the lower infill and once at the higher infil. Then open both gcode files in a text editor and replace all per-layer code in one file with the code from the same layers in the other ...


8

The answer to this is pretty much basic algebra: The software tackles the problem by using a set of functions that generate the infill pattern for ALL the build volume, then discard anything outside the shells. Which is determined by algebra: Basics Outline Function Assume the outline of the body is a function $O(l)$ that has a parameter $l$ for its length. ...


6

I don't believe that slicing engines create any sort of solid model that would be useful for CAD simulation. When a slicing engine slices a 3D model, it's goal is to spit out the preferred machine paths in G-Code (of some kind). However, I've read a few articles, done some tests, and heard through the grape vine that anywhere between 10%-35% is good enough ...


6

Hex grids are used for different reasons than triangular grids (such as you often see on bridges and roof systems). Triangles are especially good at being rigid, while hex grids are very material-efficient for a given strength. The second reason ($) is typically more important for 3D printing. Triangles do have fewer vertices than squares, but it's not ...


5

I fear I'm going to deny your question. The infil percentage and the infil pattern are two orthogonal properties, both of which contribute to the strength, density, mass, and print time of an object. Since there's no way for an algo to "know" what your desired outcome is, this can't be done. Note - I used 'orthogonal' in the Hilbert sense, meaning ...


5

As the rubber stamp needs to be soft in one axis for the whole area, you could use an infill that causes the same softness in all directions, but is sliced as such that the stamp experiences the same softness. Alternatively you can use the specific infill types for flexibility, but beware of the orientation: Concentric Cross Cross 3D First, to get the ...


4

... does Square really benefit a whole lot over parallel? That would depend by the definition of "a whole lot", of course! :) Strength Generally speaking, the variable you want to operate to tweak the overall sturdiness of your part is not the type of infill, but rather its density. According to the literature I have access to, sturdiness grow fast until ...


4

While you definitely can do this with custom slicing settings, if the "infill" is a design constraint necessary for the part to properly function, I prefer making it a part of the design rather than leaving it as something you can mess up at slicing time. This is particularly important if you will be sharing the design for use by others or using a 3D ...


4

Infill serves two main purposes. These don't seem to map particularly well to the available controls. Adding strength to the part The more plastic your part has inside, the stronger it will be. At least, that is the simplistic assumption. In fact, it seems that infill is not a particularly effective way of strengthening a part (compared for example with ...


4

I do not know the Qidi slicer, but if you look closely, you will see this line is thinner than the normal support infill lines. You could try to visualize the G-code in a viewer, usually this can be done in the slicer itself, but online viewers are available. The viewer will not only show the printed lines, but also show moves by the print head (usually in a ...


4

From your comments can be read that you print infill at 200 mm/s. Know that 200 mm/s is ridiculously fast (like high travelling speed), close to the limits of printing on certain machines (for an AtMega)! It is hard for the filament to keep up at this speed. A value of 60 mm/s would be a good value to start experimenting. Your infill is not ...


4

One hundred percent infill is not necessarily stronger than lower values. By having such a high infill figure, the forces on the model as it cools are magnified and not in a particularly good manner. Consider that you could use twenty to thirty percent infill to get the strength you require for this application, saving filament and time for the print. You'...


3

This problem is most commonly caused by infill speeds which are too high. Instead of printing lines, the filament is caught on one of the lines of the previous layer, leaves a blob there and only restarts extrusion when it hits the next line. Instead of extruding continuously the filament comes out in blobs at the locations where there's filament on the ...


3

I found a great solution! In Cura, there is a setting under Shell called Horizontal Expansion. What this does is it controls the distance between the two perimeters. A negative value in this field will make them come closer together, thus removing the gap between them. I found that -0.1 is the perfect value for 1 mm thick walls like the ones in my design. ...


3

Since I am not able to comment on this question yet, I thought I would provide an answer in addition to the already helpful insight provided. If the question in general is regarding infill percentage, and the common follow-up regards part stiffness, then it should be explained that choosing infill percentage is much more than just part stiffness. Printing ...


3

Okay so one problem at a time.. You have several issues. 1 You will likely note while it prints, the pillar will almost catch and sometimes twang as the layers get higher and higher. Issue here is you are over extruding a bit and the head is dragging on the print. Add some leverage and then you get this strange pattern. Letting it cool more between layers ...


3

I'd suggest creating a hollow tube with ~1 to 1.5 mm walls. Then to increase the strength design your own internal structure rather than relying on the slicer to fill the part. This takes longer to model but you can design the strength of your part much better. Something like this If you were to then print this with 60 % infill you'll have the ...


3

You're not sticking to your bed. Adjust your bed height. You are too far. Otherwise you are going too fast and or too hot. Calibrate the bed. Reduce speed. Then adjust temps. Also could be material contamination See this link for a visual troubleshooting. http://reprap.org/wiki/Print_Troubleshooting_Pictorial_Guide http://support.3dverkstan.se/article/...


3

In Slic3r, this can be solved by selecting a suited infill pattern and density, while enabling the only infill where needed-option: Personally, I have found the concentric infill pattern to provide good support for models with internal overhang, although other patterns might work as well. I would try different patterns at ~30% infill and inspect the result ...


3

I'm not really sure if i get you right but it seems like you gotta switch on support material. That's all. Correct me if I'm wrong but it sounds like very common situation where some parts are hanging like your yellow disks. Otherwise if your model is going to be closed at the bottom and at the top you can mock support on your own to have better control of ...


3

simple answer is math but you know that for sure more descriptive answer (but still simple and with no math) is more or less as follows slice an object with a plane to form (calculate) outline perimeter create a grid of infill according to your needs (ie: lines, grids or honeycombs) calculate where outline cuts your grid of infill abandon all what is ...


3

To achieve additional localised stiffness, you can also insert small voids (gaps) inside the model. These become double thickness walls once sliced and can be used to support things like screw holes. See the 'negative' parts used with a cube, and the sliced result here:


3

Your question is very similar to Different infill in the same part and Using multiple infill types within one model [duplicate]. The difference is that you specifically ask for Slic3r and a variation in layer height infill percentage. Actually this answer describes using "helper volumes" in Ultimaker Cura to set different properties for certain parts of the ...


3

Normally, what you're calling shoveling is caused by having the bed too high - when you deposit enough material for a space that should be the nominal layer height high, but significantly less volume is available, it has nowhere to go but up around the edges of the nozzle. However, in your case your temperatures are also seriously wrong for PETG. The normal ...


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