20

Yes, they do reduce the speed. Basically, the speed at which you feed filament determines how large of a volume comes out, and the distance you move the extruder means this volume gets distributed over this distance. However, this is not the whole story. The size of your nozzle determines only two things: the maximum layer height and the minimum feature ...


7

To get the best results, the plastic coming out of the nozzle needs to be squished/ironed down by the nozzle. If you are using a higher layer height than nozzle size, this does not happen. Instead, you are taking a 0.2mm diameter string of plastic and folding it back onto itself to create a thicker 0.3mm bead. Triffid_Hunter's calibration guide recommends ...


7

I have a dual extruder Replicator 1 and having the nozzles at the same height is a must and albeit a bit of a struggle otherwise. At one point, I had to disassemble my extruder head and the nozzles didn't line up quite right. There after, printing with the lower one obviously didn't have any troubles, however, printing with the high extruder made it so the ...


6

Variable layer height is a setting of the slicer, not an ability of the printer itself. However, the printer must be able to print at such layer heights. Any FDM (Fused deposition modeling ) or FFF (fused filament fabrication) printer, which is the type you describe in the question, is able to print at 0.1 to 0.3 mm with at least a 0.4 mm nozzle diameter. ...


5

All modern slicers adjust the nozzle position for the first layer in accordance with your chosen layer height. You can see this in your gcode if you slice files with different layer heights. Before you add special slicer settings and offsets, if you print 0.1mm layers, the nozzle will start at Z=0.1mm, and if you print 0.3mm layers, the nozzle will start at ...


5

I'm not sure exactly what you mean by your comment to Davo's answer, but with respect to your use of a sheet of paper reference, it seems like you can still use 80 gsm paper as a reference for 0.1 mm layers. From Paper Sizes Explained (emphasis is mine): There is no universal calculation for the thickness of paper based on the gsm as varitaions in ...


5

This is partial answer and comment as it was too big to fit the comment section, it will be a proper answer once the question is updated by the OP. What you call a weird spiral pattern is the result of under-extrusion. When there is under-extrusion, the resulting print is sparsely filled. The reason for this under-extrusion is most probably partial clogging ...


4

I don't have dual extruder printer myself, but to my understanding having both nozzles leveled at the same height is critical for getting successful prints. For typical FDM printers, the lowest point of the end effector should always be the nozzle. If you, for instance, mount a fan lower than the tip of your nozzle, it will eventually collide with the ...


4

I have made some learning on mechanical setup and discovered some issues on my printer, there are few: Bed warped, even with glass (thin thickness), making BAL confused with Z-movement over the bed. Overextrusion making layer oversized in terms of thickness. Some of missing mechanical fine adjustments. The main reason for this symptom was the overextrusion ...


4

You need to level the bed properly by setting the correct distance between the nozzle and the bed. Ideally, you need to be able to drag a piece of plain A4 paper between the nozzle and the bed when the nozzle is at Z = 0 giving you a little drag (you feel that by a stuttering movement). From your pictures you can clearly see that the nozzle is way too far ...


4

Maybe a better way to visualise 0.1mm is to explain that it only becomes really visible on a shallow slope. A 10 degree slope will place one layer boundary every 8mm, and these steps will probably be visible on a print. For a sphere, such as the 3D-hubs marvin, this means that the top portion will have a clear layering, but the majority of the shape should ...


4

Layer hight can be theoretically anything as long as it fits into these ranges: it needs to be at least one step for the Z-Axis motor to be physically possible it should be at max 3/4th of your nozzle diameter to create an adhesion surface In praxis, the lowest setting for layer height due to physical limitations of the extrusion systems is around 0.05 mm. ...


4

In Ultimaker Cura, unless you print a single perimeter outline and add extra wall infill support you are not going to have different outer perimeter layer heights. However, Cura is able to reduce the printing time, E.g. you can have fine layers for the wall (all perimeters), and coarse layers for the infill. The option is called "Infill Layer Thickness": ...


3

You decide which layer height you want based on the quality you desire, but never go over about 75 % of your nozzle diameter, so with your 0.4 mm nozzle never choose layer heights larger than 0.3 mm. The rationale of this rule of thumb is that the filament leaves the nozzle as a tube and needs to be flattened to make it adhere to the previous ...


3

Calibrating the first layer height involves two steps: The first step, as illustrated in that picture, is to adjust the PINDA probe to be roughly the right distance above the nozzle. The PINDA only has a sensing range of about a millimeter, so if it's too high, it can't detect the printbed; if it's too low, it will interfere with the printed object. The ...


3

To answer this question for anyone who will find this of use, I printed this calibration cube at 25mm to a side (125% scale in Cura) with my Kossel Plus using the following settings: 0.08 mm layer height 45 mm/s print speed 200°C extruder temperature with PLA Based on articles I read, I wanted to play it safe with the speed, staying well below the printer'...


3

I'm not a 3d printing expert by any means, but I had some funky layer stuff going on before "wrinkled" first layer & gross edges w/overlap. For my printer, the problem was I was over-extruding. I followed this video by Tom's 3D: 3D printing guides - Calibrating your extruder For some reason, I had to do it twice before it actually worked. Once I got ...


3

The "springs" connected to the stepper motors aren't a problem. They are special shaft couplers which allow some relief if the motor mounts are not strictly perpendicular to the lead screws. They are very rotationally stiff and allow just a little bit of misalignment between the shafts. The first two prints were from the SD card. You didn't talk about ...


3

If the first layer is not sticking well to the bed it can be caused by several issues. Usually the height of the first layer plays a significant role as does the flatness of the bed. Temperature can definitely also play a role; you want the temperature to be close or at the glass transition temperature of the plastic filament when it is in a sort of fluid ...


3

Your Z axis movement is somehow wrong. You should check steps/mm, z acceleration and speed. Try moving your z 10cm up and use caliper to check if it is correct.


3

If your printer has no way to move the heads up and down, or otherwise out of the way, and your slicer isn't able to detect collisions and account for head height differences in the produced G code, then they must be at exactly the same height from the bed. If extruder A is hanging lower than extruder B, then when B has printed at a certain level, and A ...


3

The thicker the layer, the smaller the number of interlayer contact zones (this is a weak point), the higher the strength of the part. For good interlayer adhesion, the thickness of the layer should not exceed half the diameter of the nozzle (this is pure geometry). The recommended value is 0.8 * 0.5 * D. There is an opinion that the thickness of the layer ...


3

This is under extrusion, not delamination. Delamination is the result of the under extrusion. It typically happens when the wrong filament diameter has been set in the slicer (a larger diameter than used, e.g 2.85 mm instead of 1.75 mm). Another option is that you accidentally put the printer in volumetric printing mode which is accessible through the ...


3

Just to update on this, it wasn't directly a configuration setting, it was actually a blockage in the hotend (I suspect because the PTFE tube had become unseated from some black filament that was stated as 1.75 mm but I think it had a larger diameter). After clearing through my hotend with some PTFE tube, I found a disk of the black filament I initially ...


2

Calibrate to perfection for a specific layer height. When printing in a layer height that is different than what you calibrated for, just set the first layer height in the slicer. That way, you avoid re-calibration as much as possible. My experience: I've overlooked this issue in my experience too. I would usually print in 200 microns. Then for a specific ...


2

This may be a result of an unlevel build plate (OP did not specify if calibration was done at time of writing). If the area that is overlapping is higher (closer to the nozzle), the filament will be pushed down and around the nozzle as it extrudes in that area. This will result in excess filament overlapping unto other strands on the layer. Please excuse ...


2

this is a common case in my TT.... Please check the y-carriage wheels - on the 2040 and 2020 profile. Mostly you shall find a little wobble on one of the ends, that introduces instability in leveling, so you could level it, home it and another level is needed. In my case, I decided to upgrade for dual-z drive - please see this Another interesting Z upgrade:...


2

Assuming you are using a 0.4mm nozzle, 0.1 layers are very close to the edge of what you can do. As @PR90 said, a Z adjustment will probably help. My process for this: If you have a heated bed, preheat before levelling. set a large brim on the print, slow-ish first level (about 40mm/s) start with the bed levelled normally, and start the print wait for ...


2

You likely need to re-calibrate the Z-height of your nozzle. The reason that a lot less plastic is coming out of the nozzle at 0.1mm is that the actual gap is likely smaller than 0.1mm. This makes the print bed act essentially like a partial "lid" on the nozzle which occludes the outflow of molten plastic. Simplify3D has information on their website ...


2

I think your issue is bed leveling. I recently got my Anet A8 and the biggest kill for my print quality is bed leveling. If its too far from the nozzle, I get something like your picture. You might want to try the paper test where you manually move the nozzle to each corner of the bed and adjust the bed till the paper cannot move freely between the bed and ...


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