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18

There are many different approaches to solving this issue and most of the answers already are spot-on. However, the fundamental reason for the "warping" is incorrect and inconsistent temperature across the material. If there is too much fluctuation in the temperature across the object in this heated state can result in warping. The reason you see this ...


10

Most common problem with corners is to low temperature of heated bed. Set the heated bed temperature to 110°. If this will not help then try to set brim in your slicer. The problem can be cause by other issues. You can find additional tips in following Troubleshooting Guides: overheating (simplify3d: Print Quality Troubleshooting Guide) differential ...


9

There is an option to directly insert extra commands at a specific Z height, no need to enter them manually. That said, it is a bad idea to turn off the heated bed while printing, because this will often detach the object from the bed completely (that's kind of the point of having the heated bed in the first place: better adhesion while printing, and easier ...


9

I would have to see your design to comment more but why not just change your model with the lid or top that can be either fused on later or attached in some other fashion? It is possible to turn off the heated bed after a certain layer. It looks like there is a discussion here with the G-code: Can Cura Turn Off a Heated Bed Partway Into a Print? I would ...


8

Adding a manually added brim with a larger bulk at the corner extremities that you can cut off after printing should help. My larger prints come off the printer looking like tents with concrete weights tied to their corners. The 'weights' are attached to the print by very short a 2-3 layer (depending on print size) brim-like strip that makes them easy to ...


7

This is a common problem with ABS. You might prevent it by enclosing the printer inside a box/chamber - that will create a warmer environment and the extruded material will cool down more slowly, hence not creating such a tension. Other option is to use PLA instead if possible, the problem is not so significant with PLA.


5

Not an expert by any means but I can’t see any reason you couldn’t use one half of a dual extruder. The benefits of not using one though would be decreased extruder weight. Especially given that this is a direct drive so there will be two stepper motors I believe. Reduced weight means faster print times and a reduction in certain print artifacts such as ...


5

The solution I prefer to prevent ABS withdrawal is using Blue tape on the bed, and then spread a thin layer of Polyvinyl acetate (Vinavil glue). If your printer allows it, you can also print with the bed at 110°C.


4

To answer the specific question of "why" the corners lift off, it seems it has to do with the thermal expansion (or shrinkage) and surface adhesion area. The material is deposited hot, and even after it cools is still warm, and as it cools it apparently shrinks in size slightly. Each layer therefore produces a little bit of force, pulling upwards and ...


4

In answer to the question "why do the corners lift when using ABS", the answer has to do with the coefficient of thermal expansion (or contraction). ABS, compared to PLA, has a higher coefficient meaning that as the temperature of you part changes the more the part will deform. With 3d printing, the material extruded from the nozzle is quite a bit higher ...


4

There is no way to estimate the print time of an STL file directly. The print time is based on the number of instructions in the g-code file plus the time it takes to move the effector (the hot end) around the build area. The only way to compute that is to know what settings their slicer is using and then slice your stl the way they will; and this is ...


3

It looks to me like you have corner curling on overhangs, which can be contributed to by a mix of: overextrusion (poor dimensional accuracy of filament or wrong filament diameter setting) uneven extrusion (due to changes in the print head motion faster than the flow response to changes in the extruder) uneven cooling (especially due to proximity of one side ...


3

I've managed to get a successful print! The key was to keep the material moving quickly. The settings I've customized are as follows: Print Speed: 70 mm/s Layer Height: 0.4 mm Default Printing Temperature: 215C ...and perhaps not as necessarily: Shell Wall Thickness: 0.8 mm Wall Line Count: 3 Alternate Extra Wall: True Also, I've found it important to ...


3

If your heatbed is at 40°C, and it's not dangerous until 60°C, I wouldn't worry. The heatbed is what heats up the printed object, not the print head. It will obviously heat it up a tiny bit in a small local area when printing, but the heat dissipates rapidly, only affecting the temperature of the object very little. If you're worried, try getting a laser ...


3

Although the bed may only reach 60°, the extrusion above the battery will be at closer to 200°C. Granted there will be a fairly low heat flux, but it will still cause ageing of the battery. At a minimum, some insulation or packing above the battery would seem like a sensible move. This could be printed material, and you could print over the top if you really ...


3

This may be too late to help, but I wanted to describe my own experience with the Lulzbot Taz Dual Extruder v3. It was...not good. In terms of your question, I spent a fair amount of time trying to do exactly this. It is possible, but there are some major caveats: If you are not printing with both extruders, you need to leave the one not in use unloaded. ...


3

Unluckily - for as much information on your settings you share - it is very difficult to diagnose the problem without knowing how the print failed. Did a piece become dislodged? Did the nozzle caught onto a printed piece? Did the head began extrude in mid air? ...? However this are my guesses: From your temp settings it looks like you are printing ABS. ...


2

Another approach is to put mouse ears on all the corner parts, that you clip off the print afterward. See Mouse ears defeat corner curling monster.


2

To have a material be "flexible" and retain the shape after the "flexing", you need to apply a stress in excess of the elastic deformation stress. You will want a material that has the elastic deformation limit that is much lower than the ultimate tensile strength. Unfortunately, for plastics, this is difficult to find. Most plastics are made up of ...


2

I have the same printer you do. I recall that the ooze shield is printed in alternating layers; first from E0 and then the next layer from E1. But on a given layer, I don't think that there is a guarantee that the ooze shield will be printed in the filament about to be laid down for the part of the layer. (But I might be wrong on this.) But when it comes ...


2

I would recommend using a raft on your print. A raft is a few layers that are printed on the bed before your print starts. The larger you make the raft the stronger the center of it will be. The edges may warp, but the inside where your print is will be fine. Using a raft that is mainly comprised of lines instead of solid surfaces would allow a smaller ...


2

It is already established that is is possible to calculate the estimated print duration by this anwer. The most accurate estimation is obtained with specific settings for the printer. So if you have access to the printer, your most accurate estimation would be using the software from the manufacturer or correctly setup third party software. Going to the ...


2

If the printer returns gibberish, the Baud rate of the connection is incorrect. You are using 115200 in the example above. For older Mini firmwares, it should indeed be 115200. For the newer 1.1.5.xx builds, it should be 250000.


1

Yes, E3D has a guide "LulzBot Taz6 Hemera Upgrade" if you'd like to make your own. The upgrade requires you to print parts beforehand which are found here; note that: We recommend printing the Hemera Mount in PETG, and the Fan Duct in ABS/ ASA or another high-temperature material. Use an infill percentage of 25 % or higher. The Hemera (the new ...


1

No, the print does not fail on over-extrusion, it fails by curled up parts of the print as of a filament heating/print part cooling issue. If the curled up part has to be completely attached to the print bed (which is not the case after release of more information, but could be informative for others), your problem could be bed adhesion. If the original ...


1

This looks like Z axis offset is set incorrectly. That should come with an appropriate setting from the factory (for my printer it's -.85mm), but that setting can get lost a few ways; you can either reenter the factory setting (if your print head hasn't been opened up), or recalibrate -- but if doing the latter, be sure the nozzle is clean, or the ...


1

What I could suggest here is: set the acceleration to 1 instead 0 so we have M201 X1 Y1 use G1 Xdest Ydest F3 - feed rate is given as an integer


1

Well. First. If you ever think, hmm this might cause an explosion. DON'T DO IT. SERIOUSLY. Modify the design so you can insert the battery. That said, most softwares will let you set a heater temp per layer. I have mine set through simplify 3d. I usually use this setting for the hot end, as I like to have the first layer hot. You will have bad results ...


1

Short Answer: Make the environment temperature is a bit warmer to offset the cooling rate. Long Answer All materials shrink as they cool, but some materials shrink at a much higher rate than others. This is primarily driven by temperature coefficients and thermal conductivity of the individual materials. There are calculators available online that you can ...


1

This post is meant to share experience with products that make your products stick to the bed. This is not meant to be a promotion of the products! In other answers I've seen answers hinting to Elmer's glue sticks. I have been printing directly onto the aluminium heatbed from day 2 of the i3 Prusa clone (Anet A8) printer and the glass beds of the Ultimaker ...


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