14

Without going into too much detail, since this is a very exhaustive topic, I'll write some pro's of each down from the top of my head: Cartesian XZ hotend, Y bed (eg. Prusa Mendel): easy to build (relatively) easy to maintain easy to modify understandable kinematics with the right frame, no x-y-z orthogonality (90 degree angles) needs to be adjusted ...


13

The stepper motor itself does not. You may want to inspect the motors for debris or dust. Depending on your configuration you may want to check on parts of your printer that connect to your stepper motor such as shaft couplings, pulleys, lead screws/threaded rods and belts. The stepper motor wires should occasionally be inspected for wear and strain.


10

No, stepper motors do not require maintenance. They are a brushless kind of motor, so they do not have brushes that need to be replaced.


9

Short answer no We use stepper drivers to limit the current, the travel speed is at capped by the amount of current supplied by the stepper drivers. This prevents the stepper motors from damaging themselves. You can set 200mm/s in the slicer, but you have no guarantee that that will be reached in real life. One thing to keep in mind though is that setting ...


7

What would my printer do if I set very big travel speed? If a speed is set above the limits of the stepper, the stepper will stop rotating or stutters. Basically there are 2 limits, the first is the limit of the board to generate the pulses to the stepper and second, how these pulses are processed by the stepper. The speed of steppers depends on several ...


7

Yes, fix the motors and any other loose/movable parts. Remove the bowden tube if it's there, and any other parts that are sticking out. Put the whole thing in a a bag to protect from dust, and put the bag in a box to protect it from getting beat up. Remember to calibrate it when you're ready to set it up again.


5

X stage binding like this is almost always caused by parallelism issues with the rods and/or screw. The two-rod-plus-screw arrangement is quite over-constrained and thus requires good alignment to move smoothly. Some basic troubleshooting steps: Make sure the screw is not constrained at both ends. It is very difficult to manufacture a screw that is ...


5

At a nearly microscopic level, the herringbone belt/gear combination will reduce the whoosh effect of a square profile cogged belt forcing itself into a matching profile pulley. Consider a well-sealed drawer or similar shape. Push it into the cabinet at maximum speed and force and the air is going to have a difficult time exiting. By the design of the ...


4

(NOTE: Converting comments to an answer.) An interference fit would probably work. There are a couple of styles I can think of which would do. Here are some ideas from thingiverse.com which may work for your needs. (image taken from this design by OgoSport) With this style of ball/socket, you'd have very good articulation. More than enough movement to ...


4

As discussed in the comments... The problem with the fan seems to be its flimsy attachment to the printer head. The fact the fan chassis is not firmly kept in place allows for it to act as a soundboard, amplyfing whatever vibration nomally occurs in the motor. You could probably get a fan that is more silent in the first place (noctua is a known brand for ...


4

Survivability of parts is a very tricky topic, because a lot of factors go into it. While ABS is a common industrial plastic for molding, FDM introduces quite different challenges that can impact the time a piece lives. I can't estimate a lifetime for you, but I will illustrate why we can't estimate it for you, giving you things to think about in your design ...


4

It's probably intentional. Threaded rods are almost never perfectly straight. If the nut is rigidly coupled to the carriage, then the slightest deviation in the screw will either cause it to bind up or appear as artifacts (e.g. z-wobble) in the print. By making the nut slightly loose, it can move around a bit to compensate for wobble. See e.g. this design ...


4

It's really unlikely that a bottle is using nonstandard threads; the engineering and tooling cost for doing so would not make sense. Most plastic drink bottles use PCO 1881 or PCO 1810 threads. If not, it should be one of a number of other less widely used standards. The industry term for drink bottle thread is "neck finish". Searching on that, or ...


3

freeCad has a draft rotate function in DRAFT workbench: Select an object; Press the Draft Rotate button, then; Click to set the rotating point and rotate. You will get used to that after a few trails. There is a step by step guide on freeCad site. There is also a short demo of the function here.


3

Disclaimer Questions about other machines is still in kind of a grey area right now 06/2016 and your question is, in my opinion, a bit too broad. However, I think it's a great topic to perhaps help direct the scope of this community. The lowdown 3D printers, CNC Mills, CNC Lathes, CNC Routers, and Lasers are all very different! There are certainly areas ...


3

I think this is simple, breaking it into simple parts... It is much easier to calibrate a machine where each axis does one thing. For instance, the Ultimaker; one of the few XY-on-the-same-axis printers... It has such a crazy complicated pulley system. If one thing gets out of whack, everything will start binding. Thankfully this doesn't happen as they did a ...


3

Transporting a 3D printer does not require special precautions. Obviously you should package it to protect it from damage (but this depends on the mode of transportation and how sturdy your printer is; if you are just placing it in the back of your car with no chance of it bumping in to anything, no packaging is required at all). It might be wise to secure ...


3

It really depends on what you mean by "make a 3d printing machine" You could buy and assemble an FDM printer kit. This is "making" in the same way you can "make" a cake. This is low cost and little experience is required. My 15yo son built the TronXY X3 kit I bought for $200. . There are lots of kits. You could design your ...


3

This is a pretty vague question. First of all you have to ask what kind of 3D printer you want to make, what do you want to be able to print (size/resolution?) what tools/resources you have access to, how much you want to spend vs how much time you want to build. The more time and money you put into the thing the better your final results will be. These ...


3

There could be a few issues at play. The smooth rods are not parallel which is causing the bearings to bind the further you go up. Part of the thread is damaged not allowing it to pass through the nut. The threaded rod is bent significantly to where it either doesn't pass through the nut or bind the assembly. (Is the end of the threaded rod opposite the ...


3

A mid-weight PTFE grease like the popular Superlube will work in all the cases you mention (bearings, screws, and sintered bushings). 3D printer service conditions are quite light-duty as far as lubricants are concerned. You really just need to keep everything a little bit "wet" with oil or grease and performance will be adequate. The main downside to ...


3

You can use a program known as OpenSCAD with the threads library to assist your objective. The important aspects of a thread are the major diameter (outside diameter at the thread surface), the length of the bolt/nut and for your project, the start count. The noted library has a parameter called n-starts, which covers your triple start requirement. It may ...


2

I agree with Tom about looseness. I would suggest 2 solutions: Use grease which will reduce friction (and vibrations as a consequence); Use better clutch (coupling). Full aluminium couplings are prone to conduct noise (vibrations) from the threaded rod. You can use Oldham coupling with a plastic floating member. This will definitely reduce noise on Z axis....


2

Well, to determine the time life of the gears you will need to do a test called ALT (Accelerated Life Time) but the parts should be last for a long time (not years) however this can be determined by thickness. The torque required is not than much like a tuning up the radio volume, so if you are going to create a gear box to increase torque, just grease the ...


2

Hanging up the Bowden system won't fix the problems with printing flexible filament: the filament will still press into the bends of the tube and thus lead to under extrusion. Another issue is, that the flexible filament can compress - and the longer way it has to the melt-zone, the more filament it can "store" on the way to it. These bunched up zones will ...


2

Stepper motors contain permanent magnets, which are only really damaged by heat. The coils in the motor are only damaged by high currents that would happen at voltages above the maximum rating of the motor. While it is possible to configure a stepper driver to send enough current into a stepper motor to damage it (either due to heat or over current), desktop ...


2

Frame challenge: is it just 1D printing? Each G1 command moves linearly in a single one dimensional affine subspace of the build volume. What makes 3D printing 3D is that the resulting object produced is three dimensional. There are indeed a lot of advances to be made in FDM printing by not working only within constant-Z cross sections at a time, but these ...


2

I was wondering the other day why don't all three motors move at the same time? That is perfectly possible for most printers (with limitations, "3D Printing" with all steppers being used is called "non-planar" printing), but there are some major cons you need to deal with. First, there are not that many software suites that slice objects ...


1

A high speed is unlikely to be reached unless you also set a high acceleration, and acceleration is generally more likely to cause a problem (unless you reach the pulse rate limit of the drivers). High acceleration will increase vibration, and critically requires higher torque from the motors. At some point, the torque will exceed the motor/drive current ...


1

I would also like to take a look at the A2plus Workbench (Freecad Addon). There you can define constraints which can help with this problem. As far as I know, parts cannot be moved with the mouse pointer, but angle parameters can be entered. https://freecadweb.org/wiki/A2plus_Workbench


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible