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There are printers designed for medical use, and the manufacturers supply them with varying levels of certification and testing, however I've not seen a filament manufacturer certify their material as bio-compatible separate from the printer. The printing process changes the material slightly in the best case (and significantly with poor temperature control ...


4

You ask about "filament", so I assume you expect fused-filament technologies. These are however not accurate enough, besides being prone to gaps and crevices which are problematic in crowns. The smallest viable nozzle, 0.2 mm, is still too rough for that. Dental 3D printers need to be very accurate, so the most common technologies used are stereolithography ...


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Not in that price range 5000 USD might sound much, but it is far outside of the scope of an industrial 3D printer. You ask to print parts that are safe for implantation, so you need a machine that is allowed to produce medical implants. A machine that makes medical products needs to have them certified by the authorities. These demand strict tests on ...


3

I am not an expert but I think you will find that because 3D printers use a layer by layer construction method, and the boundary between the layers creates grooves along the surface or leaves a rough texture on the surface. That the textured surface left by 3D printer construction would trap microbes and make 3D printed objects not suitable for medical ...


3

If resolution is your upmost concern then resin 3d printers are the way to go. They use a liquid resin that does not harden until a UV laser is shined through them. Apparently they get ultra high resolution and smooth finishes right out of the box. The downside is they are generally more expensive machines and the resin material itself is also a higher cost. ...


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For anything where there is an open or bandaged wound, you should NOT use 3D printing, and should use sterilized medical equipment to prevent infection and heavy metals infiltrating the bloodstream. SLA/SLS 3D printing may be the best option for replicating the complex structure of the splint you have pictured above, as FDM printers have difficulty ...


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Generally, if you care about achieving a specific structure inside the "interior" part of a model to be printed, that structure needs to be part of your model rather than generated by a slicer. If it were me, I would programmatically generate a generic pattern for the pockets of hollowness in OpenSCAD over a region slightly larger than the bone, then ...


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Find another medical facility that is doing it, and ask what equipment and filament they use. They may also have a source for medical related models. I would expect medical stuff to be regulated by the FDA, so there are probably limitations on what you can get.


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