11

It's not hollow or enclosed structures that are a problem. It's structures that are hollow and enclosed. Think about it. The machine lays down a thin layer of powder, and then a laser fuses some of that powder together to make a shape. Then, it repeats the process for the next layer. If you try to build, for example, a hollow ball, the ball gets created in ...


7

Printing metal (directly) is done in mainly two types: Laser Sintering (LS), where a metal compound or alloy is sintered into form. For example, Tungsten Carbide is Laser Sintered. Common shorthands are SLS, DMLS, and SMLS, but others crop up too. Laser Melting, where the laser actually smelts the metal into spot. DMLS/DMLM (direct metal laser (s)melting) ...


6

Anzalone and friends published A Low-Cost Open-Source Metal 3-D Printer in IEEE Access: This paper reports on the development of a open-source metal 3-D printer. The metal 3-D printer is controlled with an open-source micro-controller and is a combination of a low-cost commercial gas-metal arc welder and a derivative of the Rostock, a deltabot RepRap. The ...


4

You can get the 0.1 micron (100 nm) resolution with a 2-photon 3D printer, but only in a polymer resin. Nanoscribe, in Germany, pioneered this technology, see Mechanical Microstructures. Their commercial printer, the Photonic Professional GT, is about $350,000 US with software and accessories. There is some work being done to replicate the 3D printed ...


4

FFF/FDM You can create a metal object via metal casting or using a special filament containing metal parts. Metal filament You print with a special filament that contains from mixture of metal and plastic. After the print you heat up the object around 450°C to burn plastic away and melt metal grains together. You need a kiln. DIY kiln is about 150$. ...


3

There is a lot of misinformation in the 3D printing world about "all-metal hotends" being an upgrade. Some of them, especially clones, are not even all-metal but just poor lookalikes that create all sorts of problems. But even if you get a real one, it's a trade-off, not an upgrade. It lets you print materials that need a hotend temperature over ...


3

Let's start with the obvious: this printer would need to be really big. Not because of a large print volume, but because it needs to collect a lot of sunlight or needs a really big focussing array. The linked question states that the array there, about 0.6 m² large, has roundabout 600 W of power to focus on that one point. Power draw needs What powers are we ...


3

SLS uses a high powered laser to smelt the binder of a ceramic or the metal itself. We are talking about at least a 40 W laser which focuses its power on a circle of about 50 µm. How much power are we talking about with that lowest viable laser for plastic SLS? $\frac{40\ \text{W}}{\pi \ 62.5\times 10^-9\ \text{m}^2}=640\times 10^6 \frac{\text{W}}{\text{m}²}...


3

There's atom-based-printing 3D printers that only some universities have. There aren't other 3D printers that can get even 0.001 mm precision, you want 0.0001 mm, that's pretty dicey. Just breathing on the device will make it shift a layer. Just walking on the floor next to such a device would kill it. This one works with resins though, Ultra-...


2

There are no 3D printers (that I'm aware of) that can do 0.0001 millimeters, hobbyist or industrial, plastic or metal. For that matter I think you'll be hard pressed to find a CNC mill with that type of tolerances. Sorry!


2

You ask some very interesting questions! Firstly, when researching topics such as this, you will have far more luck using 'additive manufacturing' as a search term rather than '3D printing'. In the professional industrial environment, '3D printing' is not a term that is really used to describe the manufacturing you are talking about. Selective laser melting ...


2

I would think it's definitely possible, steel 3D printers are most likely capable of printing with the kind of precision you need (I've had experience designing and printing barrels for handguns as part of a forensic science research project), but be aware that with most processes I'm aware of, you'll need to go in post-production and do some polishing or ...


2

This depends primarily on economics and on desired lifetime. Rather obviously you need a material whose strengths and melting points exceed the operational specs. Determining the various break strengths (shear, bending, etc) is an engineering problem, not a manufacturing problem per se. Next, consider the production time and cost of 3D-printing vs. some ...


2

I think this depends on what you are trying to accomplish with the 3D printer. I have seen people online build metal 3D printers from a robot arm and a welder this would probably be the simplest design and build but robot arms that can weld are expensive. I have also seen that someone at MIT build a glass 3D printer by building a small kiln with a hole at ...


2

You can do lost-PLA investment casting, the actual gear to do it is kind of pricey unless you're willing to create your own DIY forge for melting aluminum. Check it out though, you don't need a special printer to do it. There's also a way to coat your prints with metal it would require an electric current and some nasty chemicals, but it's possible as an ...


1

This is a free ebook that I have perused briefly which it looks interesting, and it is free (did I say that already?) 3D Printing of metals Manoj Gupta ISBN 978-3-03842-591-5 (Pbk); ISBN 978-3-03842-592-2 (PDF) Three other books that might be of interest are: 3D Printing with Metals for Design Engineers, Explained Ann R. Thryft Downloadable free ebook, ...


1

Whilst this is not a definitive answer, if you watch the video on their website, LENS 450 Systems, it is the bed that moves in the X and Y axes - the head remains static. The bed also appears to move in the Z axis, after each layer (as there is noticeable bed wobble). However, the head is on an armature so it could be that which moves - it is not entirely ...


1

Some companies are already on the move with this idea. I think I remember hearing that Pratt and Whitney and Boeing are 3D printing some of the smaller air foils. The advantages being that they can achieve manufacturing of more complex, more efficient parts without the hassle of quality control, expensive fixturing/maintenance, and less hands on their ...


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