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17

All credits for the following go to user "vermon" who posted in this thread. The following is a heavily amended version from his longer answer there. Makerbot did start its hotend series using MK as iteration designator (for Mark). The first commercially available version was the [Makerbot] MK4 on the Cupcake circa 2009. MK4 was hand built with nichrome ...


15

I believe the little experiment made by E3D - the same link you provide - answers your question very well. Several points about wear can be found in this article. After printing only 250 grams of ColorFabb XT-CF20 (carbon fiber filament): The nozzle diameter had increased markedly The inner walls of the orifice (opening) showed deep sharp ridges and grooves ...


15

There are several things at play that can make a wider line nice to have: First layer adhesion Due to some filaments having serious struggle to get the first line or layer stuck to the bed, it can be an easy fix to just increase the line width, generating a bigger Adhesive Force $F_a\propto A(l,w)$, where A is the area covered by the line, and thus simply $A=...


14

1) Smaller nozzle advantage: sharper "corners" (higher X and Y resolution) 2) Larger nozzle advantage: faster 3d printing (because you can print the shell faster as each perimeter can be thicker so you'll need less perimeters to be printed to get the same shell thickness. Same true for infill). 3) Smaller nozzle disadvantage (varies, debatable): higher ...


13

Generally speaking, both settings result in the same1: The feed rate of the filament gets adjusted. Either you set a general multiplier, or you demand a wider line which does make it set a higher multiplier hidden in the software. 1 - if you don't look at any other factor that is! But... There is always a but, and this one is big: While we can work with the ...


10

Shouldn't a 0.4 mm nozzle create a line of plastic 0.4 mm wide Not necessarily. Due to a phenomenon known as die swell extruding plastic through a 0.4 mm nozzle, the line of plastic that is created is actually slightly wider. Pressure inside the extruder compresses the plastic slightly, and it expands again as it exists the nozzle. They ...


9

This photo isn't exact, but may help Edit: Whoops! Forgot to include source. This is from the Wanhao User Manual/Build Guide. I can't quite find the webpage at the moment.


8

Thermal conductivity of brass is approximately twice as better than steel (not stainless). Given that the size of nozzle is relatively small, it should be able to transfer enough heat for a medium-speed prints at least. I have printed PLA and ABS using "steel" nozzle (brand of steel unknown) at the speed around 80 mm/s without any visible ...


8

You need a certain minimum flow rate to achieve consistent extrusion. Flow rate is the product of print speed, extrusion width (proportional to nozzle size) and print speed. If you use a very small nozzle and very low layer height, you'd need a very high printing speed to achieve a reasonable flow rate. Therefore, it's quite possible this is not a mistake ...


8

One of the things I look for is if you pull the print head a good ways off the bed and have it extrude. It should just squirt plastic straight down. If it bends sharply in one direction, or even curls back on itself, then that is a sign of damage.


8

Replacing the nozzle depends on many things, the nozzle material (copper/brass, steel, hardened steel, Olsson Ruby Nozzle), the type of filament you print, how frequently you use the 3D printer. To replace a nozzle, there are probably a few reasons for doing so. A nozzle can wear out (see: How to identify nozzle wear; not only from the friction of ...


7

The main issue with very narrow extrusion widths (less than the nozzle size) is that you get really poor "nozzle squash." The plastic isn't pressed down very hard as it's extruded. That causes poor layer bonding and weaker prints. The flow of molten plastic coming out of the nozzle must be drawn down by tension in order to end up smaller than the nozzle ...


7

The nozzle on a Prusa i3, if a genuine Prusa, would be part of the E3Dv6 assembly and is removable. It's wise to heat the nozzle to 150°C or higher, and handle with the care necessary for something that hot. When loosened, be prepared for it to fall onto the surface below. A catching tin would be a good idea, at the very least. Once removed, you can test ...


6

Traditionally, using a piece of paper (about 0.004" thick) gets you close to your appropriate standoff. However, if you adjust your layer thickness, your standoff should reflect this. Ideally, you will set your standoff roughly with a piece of paper or other type of shim stock, then "fine-tune" the standoff during a benchmark print. If I'm remembering ...


6

You are suffering from what is called "heat creep". Molten filament is creeping up the heat break and into the bowden tube, where it is causing a jam. You need to install a proper radiator block that is cooled by a fan, not just a lump of wood as a "cold end". The cold end is not just a connector, its primary purpose is to act as a cooler. A hot end on its ...


6

You won't need specialized nozzles, you understand the material wrong: The benefit the properties of this material grant is not super fine prints (which you can get with small nozzles like 0.1 mm already), it is that you can print at super low temperatures. Printing it at standard 200°C will mean, that it won't solidify in the time the printer needs it to, ...


6

E3D have a blog post on the subject of hardened nozzles. The common abrasive materials are carbon fibre, wood impregnated filament (or any other particulate fill), and some pigments. The blog describes that as little as 250g of the more abrasive filaments can wreck a brass nozzle. For wear resistance, different manufacturers will have different options. ...


6

Just move the Z-endstop up a little higher, also make sure the bed leveling screws are not completely screwed in. So: Move the head of the printer up. Move up the Z-endstop so that the nozzle is a little higher than the build platform. Home the printer. Disable the stepper motors and move the head over the bed to a certain position (e.g. a corner without ...


6

Differentiation The main differences between the e3D-Nozzle family and the "simple" Nozzle are the wrench size, body length and thread length of the nozzle. In fact, I have come across 2 different "Chinese" styles of nozzle, a "big" and a "small" one. Comparison For comparison, take a look at this photo, where I aligned the lower ends of the bodies to ...


6

An obvious drawback is the lack of a flat surface around the opening, resulting in a severe limitation of the extrusion width to exactly the nozzle width (plus some percent). This nozzle cannot efficiently push the filament against the nearby perimeters because it cannot constrain its height and it cannot flatten the top of the already extruded one. So layer ...


5

It looks like you got too tight nozzle, too cold hotend or extruding speed is too high (all could be in the same time of course). As filament goes into the teflon tube (coldend) and then into hotend it doesn't have enough time to go out throught the nozzle. So it causes that melted filament accumulates in hotend and pushes out teflon tube. Check application ...


5

I'd say you should experiment with Slic3r it can manage extrusion in very sophisticated way it can overextrude if you need a line wider than actual nozzle size as same as it can underextrude if needed it can even change extrusion continuously while extruding one line here are simple examples i use mattercontrol take a look here - this is the same object ...


5

I have seen this after I reassemble the extruder heat block and then leave it too loose during the print. Is your extruder above the nozzle coated in a brown or black film? What happens is the liquid plastic oozes through the loose connection, travels around the outside of the block, where it is heated longer and hotter than normal turning it black/brown. ...


5

A nozzle with a nozzle width of 0.3 mm cannot print a 0.3 mm layer height. You could do that but you should not as you ultimately pay the price in the form of a less aesthetic finish. The general rule of thumb is to maximize the layer height at 75 % of the nozzle width, so a 0.3 mm nozzle would allow for a maximum of 0.225 mm. The rationale is that the ...


5

Let me clean up a little nomenclature The PTFE tube is either a Bowden Style Setup delivering the filament from the extruder down through the cool-end and to the heatbreak or just a liner in the cool-end and heatbreak for direct drive. In both cases they are to prevent clogs. In most setups it is not pushed into the nozzle which is in the heater block (they ...


5

PLA starts to change its properties at above its glass transition temperature of 60-65 °C, if stored there too long. Keeping it at 160°C, close to the melting temperature (173-178 °C) can degrade the material relatively rapidly. During an extrusion, this is usually mitigated by filling fresh material into the melt while the older material gets ...


5

According to Anycubic this printer uses the E3D V5 type hotend as can be seen from the linked video of the AnyCubic Mega: The brass nozzle you see is fully compatible with the E3D v6 nozzle and can be found on those typical auction and Chinese websites by looking for "E3D nozzle". They are also available from E3D directly, the designer/creator of the E3D ...


5

Searching the CuraEngine source, the only places I can find where nozzle size is used directly involve some arcane logic for merging of infill lines, such as: https://github.com/Ultimaker/CuraEngine/blob/05e93dabce9e863b8742fd69ed87717e1594e7a9/src/MergeInfillLines.cpp#L124 So essentially, yes, nozzle size mainly serves as a default value for the line ...


5

Ceramic I can understand - very strong, great thermal range capability. Glass not so much - you'd need some seriously careful annealing at least. In either case the material is much harder than brass, or even steel, so you could presumably use tougher tools to unclog, etc. as needed. If you're using materials loaded with wood or metallic particles, the ...


5

First off, this is not a glass nozzle, it is a whole hotend design. A super simplistic one. Glass is, like ceramics, not a good thermal conductor but has a quite good thermal resistance - it only melts at about 1600 °C, which means you will never have to fight melting or warping of the filament path itself at all - the heater copper wire will melt at about ...


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