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4

I recently experienced exactly the same problem. For me it was related to an incorrect heater cartridge. I accidentally used a 12 V cartridge in a 24 V powered system. The heater element got accidentally mixed up between the higher voltage parts container and I forgot to check the resistance. Inserting the correct voltage heater immediately fixed ...


3

It turned out, it was a faulty heater, that wasn't able to reach and maintain temperatures over 195 °C in a stable manner. The order came, had a new 50 W heater, thermistor and a PTFE-Bowden tube. It works just fine again, now!


3

Besides the P, I and D values, you may also have to tune PID_FUNCTIONAL_RANGE and PID_INTEGRAL_DRIVE_MAX. Basically, the functional range disables PID control when more than the set number of degrees away from the target temperature and just puts the heater to zero/maximum power. The integral drive max parameter limits the value of the integral term of the ...


2

As the heating curve is very steep, it could be that the wrong cartridges are inserted, or you have been supplied the incorrect cartridges. (Not long ago I've had a similar experience with a 12 V cartridge in between my 24 V spares...) To find out for which voltage the cartridge has to be used you can measure the resistance with a multitester/multimeter. You ...


2

PID tuning can be performed multiple times and the results saved for future use, since the question is about "what are the usable ranges for PID tuning", based on my experience a slightly suboptimal tuning will not make the temperature oscillate more than 2-3 degrees, which is more than enough for most traditional filaments if you have a 30-40 °C ...


1

It's not a straight answer, but you don't have to run PID tuning every time you decide to print with different temperature. (Until you change something in a hardware near or related to the hotend.) You can tune PID for different temperatures and grab necessary values, for example: M303 C16 D1 E0 S190 22:14:31.872 > PID Autotune finished! Put the last Kp, ...


1

I find my Ender 3 Max has "phases" where each and every print will end in a thermal error, always at layer 2. During these phases, I disable retraction to keep the flow of filament constant through the hot end and into the nozzle. While my prints are a little messier than I would like, more often than not they actually finish. Another thing that ...


1

You can edit the temperature control commands out of your gcode, or just tell your slicer to omit them, typically by setting temperature to 0. Then, as you suggested, start the print manually once your industrial PID tells you it's at-temperature.


1

It is all about resistance. This requires some formulae: $U = Voltage$ $I = Current$ $R = Resistance$ $P = Power$ $U = I \times R$ $P = U \times R$ $ R = \dfrac{P}{I^2} = \dfrac{U^2}{P} $ The 12 V, 40 W cartridge has a resistance of about 3.6 Ω. If you use this cartridge at 24 V, this caculates to a power of 160 W! This ...


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