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10

Disclaimer: I am not affiliated with any linked brand or company, I just link to them for reference of the suggested print settings. What is PLA? PLA is, by its definition PolyLacticAcid, a polymer of entwined lactic acids. It is commonly made from fermenting starch - not via Type I (alcohol) but Type II (lactic acid) fermentationuser77232, Wikipedia. ...


5

There’s no huge difference between both. The printing settings like temperature and printing speed are practically the same. But the PLA+ have a much better surface quality and it’s slightly more bright than normal PLA. Another difference is that the PLA+ it's more effective in bridges than PLA. If you want to the comparison between PLA and PLA+ go right ...


3

PLA+, depending on the brand, is probably a mixture of other plastics (things like TPU1) to help improve upon the weaknesses of regular PLA like brittleness and moisture absorbing. Or they simply used a higher quality PLA blend to create the filament. I do not have a specific source except from collaborating with different materials experts such as ...


3

A portion of information missing from the manufacturer's specifications and in the question is the print speed. You could have slower speeds than the manufacturer used to perform the tests, which requires lower temperatures to reduce the "flow rate" of the plastic to an acceptable level. In some cases, I use as low as 20 mm per second print speed, others ...


3

Some of these questions could be answered by asking manufacturers for MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets), aka. SDS (Safety Data Sheets). Under EU laws in place since 2008 any substance shipped into the EEA (European Economic Area) in quantities of more than 1 tonne/year, whose composition contains more than 0.1% by weight of a compound identified in the ...


2

Even as PLA+ contains some additives, each printer is different. We usually never know what the actual temperature of the printhead is, but if your printer prints good at 205 °C, despite the manufacturer claiming you should use a little more temperature, use it. It might be the perfect combination of temperature and speed for your printer. Your printer is ...


1

The photos show that the problem is occurring at around the same height. It seems that at a certain Z height something is deflecting the other axis (not sure if it's X or Y) which resolves itself. I suspect that the rod on which the Z axis rides is either bent or has a dimple, where the rollers pass over it. Either that or perhaps a roller has a dimple.


1

All those prints are terrible compared to what my Printrbot LC v2 can do, I think you should do a full calibration of the printer cooling, temperature, extrusion factor. Anyway, the issue of layer shift corrects itself because ... it happens again. Nothing else. Printrbot LC v2 had quite an aggressive acceleration already, and you increased the weight of ...


1

This has nothing to do with speed, temperature, adhesion, and whatever you do, DO NOT extrude more material per line (increase flow rate), as this will make the problem that much worse. This is a fairly simple problem with an even simpler fix: you're over extruding. Reduce your flow rate by 5%, and see if that fixes the issue. It will definitely improve ...


1

I know this is an old question, but CNC Kitchen just recently did a review of PLA+ and the mechanical properties of one brand, and found it far weaker than plain PLA, but with failure modes that might be mord graceful/preferable for some applications. In short, it stretched and tore rather than snapping.


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PLA+ is a brand. Where PLA and ABS have specific chemical meanings (more or less... manufacturers already will have different additives or processes), the only real requirement for PLA+ is using some unknown quantity of PLA as a base. Look at coffee beans as an example: we have Arabica vs Robusta. Arabica is usually considered better, for some definition ...


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