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I have this exact problem as well. I am feeding filament from the dry box through the tube into the top of the hot end. After approximately 2 days I would notice that the filament is broken somewhere close to the hot end. I don't believe that it's just humidity. I suspect that the filament being brittle and being made to conform to the PTFE tube's shape, ...


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These are more like backups for when the part gets stuck, but you could try spraying that part where it meets the bed with liquid computer duster. The shrinkage from cooling usually helps to release the part from the bed. You could also try heating the bed very hot to save the bed at the expense of the part.


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TL;DR - No... well, yes you can, but it won't decompose in your lifetime. Addressing this question fully - from the point of composting, rather than landfill: From Wikipedia - PLA - End of life: Composting: PLA is biodegradable under industrial composting conditions, starting with chemical hydrolysis process, followed by microbial digestion, to ultimately ...


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CNC Kitchen has a series of videos covering research on this topic, ending up with using salt. The oven temperature used for PLA was 200˚C reaching 190˚C at the core of the salt. Lower temperatures (especially without support) are of much more questionable value. From my experience, I believe that similar results might be ...


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I've only annealed PEEK personally, but a quick search returns varying recommendations: All3DP recommends 1 hour at 70 °C. X3D recommends 1 hour at 110 °C. Matterhackers recommends 10 minutes at 105 °C for Tough PLA or HTPLA. A post on Reddit recommends "a few hours" at 110 °C. I'd do a test suite with pieces at 70 °, 90 °, and 110 °C for an ...


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For some filament materials an enclosure without ventilation is too warm. You could run a hose to the outside like a cloths dryer uses and use a fan to blow the air out through it. Then, a filtering system is unnecessary. My understanding is a resin printing system is more complex to maintain. You probably would only want to go that direction if you ...


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The VOC issue is overblown. Unless you print constantly, you don't need any air treatment. Often that kind of treatment is installed by people who like DIY for the fun of it, not because it's really needed. Characterization of volatile organic compound emissions from consumer level material extrusion 3D printers shows that dangerous chemicals may, in some ...


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