10

Electrical engineering can be quite complex, but in this case you can save yourself with same simple equations/relations. Using the following formulae: Voltage ($\ U$) equals current ($I$) multiplied by the electrical resistance ($R$) $$ U=I \times R $$ and Power ($P$) equals the square of the current multiplied by the electrical resistance $$ P=I^2 \...


8

I don't know if this is the case with all FLSUN QQ printers, but mine was indeed set to 220v as the instructions/user manual indicated. First I needed to remove the bottom of the printer. Then there was a switch on the side of the power supply with the following label: I know the picture is terrible, but the lighting inside the base of the printer was less ...


5

What you are looking for is called a "buck converter" or a "step down module". These literally cost about half a buck/Euro a piece. These converters convert a high voltage into a low voltage, the better ones are able to draw 2 to 3 Amps, which is required for stable operation of the Raspberry Pi. If you have an old computer power supply of a decent brand (...


5

This definitely sounds like a problem with your wiring if you have a genuine Anet A6, the genuine A6 comes with a 12864 full graphic display. For sure, you are missing 1 flat ribbon cable (see below). Maybe this is causing the LCD not to light up and the SD card not functioning. As the "fan 2" is working, the board is powered by the power supply (this fan is ...


5

The UK uses 230 V mains voltage. The 220 V designation is from the past, Europe is now using 230 V. You do not have to worry about the frequency. You should place the switch to 220 V and plug the cord into the socket. The printer should start immediately booting (cycling) the printer firmware, the LCD should light up and the cold end ...


4

I would expect the root cause to simply be the power supply itself. 5 Ω is a reasonable resistance for a 12 V / 30 W heater. It seems strange that you are not seeing continuity in the heated bed as this should also have a low resistance (since it's a heater as well). This might be worth investigating further, but I think it's more likely the power ...


4

Without knowing the exact part numbers used for F1 and F2 it is impossible to say whether the fuses need to be replaced or not. However, based on the manufacturer provided schematic and BOM we can make a pretty good guess. Looking at the PDF you linked, it states that F1 is rated for 16V. Looking at the BOM spreadsheet it also says F1 is 16V and 30A. Based ...


4

You need to closely look at how to connect to the output connectors. In this case it appears that you have wired it correctly according to the stamped in markings above the connectors. You have chosen not to connect the earth, this is strongly advised. Did you check if the power switch matches the voltage of your country? If you are in Europe the switch ...


4

Given that the capacitor near the input is quite clearly marked 35 V, a 36 V rating seems questionable. The (buck) regulator used on the (genuine version of the) board is the AOZ1282CI which supports up to 36 V input. This is probably where they got the 36 V rating from, but obviously the 35 V-rated capacitors drop the input voltage ...


3

@Oscar was correct, so long as the switch is set at 220 V, the printer will turn on. I am adding this answer to help anyone else who has a similar problem. I strongly recommend that you buy a multimeter if you have any power supply issues, as this helped me to figure out what was wrong. There were three issues that needed to be rectified before my printer ...


3

Where are you plugging in the USB power to the Pi? If you are back powering it from the data connection, you will bypass the fuses and potentially ruin your Pi or worse. Look at this wiki under the power section: Back-Powering; (powering the Raspberry Pi from a USB hub through the uplink/data port, single cable) Back powering is possible on the Raspberry ...


3

Short answer YES. You can run it from a different power supply at a higher voltage. Also it has a PC817 Optical isolator (for some reason) therefore the second power supply and your main board should not be electrically connected at all.


3

You are looking for a capacitor that must be connected to Pin 4 of the LM2596. Maybe you could provide a better picture of that area so we could see the different tracks on the board. The LM2596 is in the center of the right side of the board (it is also labeled with LM2596D). The pins should be counted from top to bottom (in your picture) My guess is, ...


3

Just after I posted this I tried swapping various components with my other Ender 3. It turns out a faulty power supply will produce this effect. When I swapped out the power supply it started normally.


2

An important note on Voltage Rating Just to add to the existing answers. If you are planning on upgrading the capacitors to some with larger capacitance, then assuming that they are for the supply regulation/smoothing then upping the capacitance shouldn't be (too much of) an issue. If they are used for timing, i.e. in an RC circuit (which seems unlikely in ...


2

For completion, I've just seen this, Can a ramps 1.6 support 24v? (which basically confirms the 24 V support of the Re-ARM board) although it isn't particularly useful w.r.t. the RAMPS 1.6 side of things, although I would imagine the the 24 V RAMPS hack would still apply. In addition, Alex Kenis does a great review, and he has successfully tried ...


2

Unless you know what you're doing, do not remove the covers from a PSU. The components can store a lethal charge long after power is removed, even if the fuse is blown. My guess is something loose (now vapourised) in the PSU. Electronics have a tendancy of failing either quite soon after manufacture, or lasting reasonably well. This is described with the ...


2

Yes you can, but you should be aware that running at higher voltage implies that the current also increases. Your wiring and connectors to the heated platform have to be able to transport that extra current (e.g. the wires, the ones I got where very low quality, and connectors that came with my Anet A8 where not even rated for the standard load, let alone an ...


2

You're quite right :) L (AC): Brown colour. Single Phase line or Three Phase Line (L1) N (AC): Blue colour. Neutral GND: Green and yellow colours. Protective earth or ground (PE) COM: DC Negative (-) - Also referred to as "Common" V+: DC Positive (+) V(ADJ). This is for a potentiometer, in order to modify the output voltage. You won't need this unless ...


2

The easiest way to know how powerful the PSU should be is to download from https://github.com/rcarlyle/StepperSim the Excel workbook which simulates the power absorbed by the stepper motor. Input the motor specifications, check in the graph the max speed at which you plan to run it, check the absorbed power, add 20% for the various losses. Once you know the ...


1

Check the diameter of the cable. The smaller the diameter the higher the resistance, thus the heat. AWG14 seem a bit small.


1

The PCB heatbed Mk2B has a reported resistance between 1.0-1.2 Ω. The current that is drawn from the power supply equals about 12/(1.0 or 1.2) = 10-12 A. Note that this amount of current requires cables that can carry that load, too thin cables heat up. Note that you have wired the bed correctly for 12 V (see image below), the wires ...


1

No not by itself. Also you need to check the wires in the ATX power supply as 16 gauge wire might melt depending on how many amps it needs. You could on the other hand connect 2 ATX power supplies the plus 12v on power supply 1 to the 12v ground on the second power supply. Then use a volt meter to confirm your getting 24v out. On the 2 leads not ...


1

No, it probably won't work as you want. As explained in another answer, you will only achieve 25% of the expected power. So it will take 4 times as long to heat up, will have a lower 'highest temperature', and most critically will reduce the possible print speed by a factor of around 4 (actually more, since a proportion of the power is lost to the room ...


1

You are looking at the wrong board Your board might on the surface look like a Creality v 2.0 board, and is indeed from the same family of boards. After trying to discern the parts and finally resorting to google image search, I almost had to maniacally laugh: The currently latest version is the Creality 2.1, but your board clearly is a pre 2.0 board, as the ...


1

This really sounds like there is a short somewhere on the RAMPS add-on board. It is advised to not use the RAMPS add-on shield to prevent damage to the Arduino or the shield. Personally, I would ditch this one and buy a new one. By the looks of the picture you are using a clone RAMPS, these are mass produced and the quality is not always the best (many ...


1

I had a similar issue building my Prusa i3 Mk2s clone. I was constantly hooking & unhooking my Arduino from my PC while the printer was plugged into the mains. At some point it had enough & it released some "magic smoke". Later on I found out this was the power regulator on the Arduino. You shouldn't need to plug in the USB and the ...


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