17

The function of the front fan is keeping the cold end well... cold. :) It should be spinning as long as the printer is turned on. The right fan is known as "part fan" and its function is to cool down the plastic that has been just extruded, the idea being to solidify it as soon as possible. As you noticed it is controlled by the gcode and it can be turned ...


10

Filament expands as it gets hot. Cooling the filament will make it shrink, so cooling the filament deposited on the bed can lead to adhesion problems and warping of your products. This is exactly the reason why you use a heated bed (the delta temperature is smaller). So keep the cooling off for the first layers and you'll be fine. Additionally (having ...


9

Everybody's combination of fan hardware and print settings is different. Unless someone else has the exact same printer and slicer profiles as you, there's no way to really say anything like "use X% for PLA" or whatever. For practical purposes, you just empirically figure it out with test prints based on a few simple rules of thumb: Use lots of cooling for ...


8

After trying many different things, I found out that the solution is really simple and requires only a few lines of code. I'll answer my own question in the hope that this will help someone. First, I defined a few constants (macros actually). To keep my own stuff separate, I created a new file for them called myconfig.h: #define MY_BED_TEMP_THRESHOLD 50 #...


5

Is there a reason why a set of wires, which look perfectly fine from the outside, would fail to run the fan? The internal conductor is broken. This can happen over time due to metal fatigue from the constant movement, and the cables getting snagged may indeed have something to do with it. You could try desoldering the current wires from the fan and ...


4

Yes these do exist, but I've never seen them in the size you are interested in, see e.g. these projector fans: An alternative are fans that attract flow from both sides, like: but I've not seen them in the small size you are interested in. Considering the placement of the fans in the printed cooling duct you posted, I see no problem in using 2 similar ...


4

https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/120mm-Small-Squirrel-Cage-Exhaust-Plastic_653850349.html?spm=a2700.7724857.normalList.14.23834341IiKFAu&s=p After quite a bit of searching the above link from Alibaba was all I could find. I suspect that they don't make them like that because of the direction of the rotation of the blades. Perhaps they are made so ...


4

Yes, this should work. According to this 4-pin fan specification, such fans use a 5V PWM signal. You would have to make sure the PWM frequency on the pin you use satisfies that 21-28 kHz range specified in the document. According to 3.3 and 3.4 in the document, you may not be able to turn the fan off completely when using the PWM input signal.


4

From the sources of Marlin you can find how may fans you can use, even if you're not a coder it should be doable. From there you can find how to set the pins for the fans, provided that there are free unused and exposed (so that you do not have so solder directly to the microprocessor). First find how many fans are possible. Starting in Marlin_main.cpp and ...


4

I use side-wind to cool down model as simple as possible. It's just a 12cm in diam fan which is driven from arduino (the same contacts as the fan next to the nozzle). No duct, no other stuff. The only thing I consider in terms of making things better is to set up 2 fans which could coll down model from both sides. The issue is that when model is more ...


4

As discussed in the comments... The problem with the fan seems to be its flimsy attachment to the printer head. The fact the fan chassis is not firmly kept in place allows for it to act as a soundboard, amplyfing whatever vibration nomally occurs in the motor. You could probably get a fan that is more silent in the first place (noctua is a known brand for ...


3

Now that you have done some measurements, you could make some conclusions. The voltage over the fan is reported to be constant, but the current starts at 110-115 mA and reduces to 90 mA over time. With limited knowledge of electronics you can conclude that the resistance of the fan is not constant as the resistance determines the amount of current ...


3

The printer already has a built in fan with a fan shroud that directs air to the hotend Unless your printer is defective, it may look like so, but the airflow should really be directed towards the print, not the hot-end. Cooling the hot-end will at best just waste energy, requiring extra heat to keep it hot, at worst affect your print quality negatively. ...


3

It will work, but likely with reduced performances: designing blades is not an easy task and the ones you can print will not be as good as the ones designed for that specific fan. Overall, do it for fun before you replace the fan anyway. IF your fan has symmetrical blades (unlikely), another option is to break the opposite blade to balance the fan.


2

The MKS GEN L v1.0 is a board that according to the information found on the web operates to run on a voltage between 12 - 24 V, this means that all peripherals on the board should match this voltage. A 5 V fan should therefore not be connected. First, you need to establish that you are using the correct fan port on the board. Which port to use? If you take ...


2

If the fan you are using is not defective and if you test another fan that behaves in a similar manner, it's possible your firmware or hardware are the root cause of the problem. The controller directs the driver to vary the power provided to the fan. It's a method called pulse wave modulation, aka PWM. Full voltage is applied to the fan one hundred percent ...


1

Considering this printer is a Chinese designed and built printer, the most obvious choice for screws is metric system screws. These are most probably M2 screws; if you look at the screw heads (Allen key screws) the size with respect to the fan (40x40x10 mm => fan thickness is 10 mm) seem confirm the assumption (head height is 2 mm as seen in the image of ...


1

It's a standard part. You can find fitting replacement fans easily by searching for the dimensions and the voltage. It's better to use a molded part as it is smoother and lighter than any FDM printed one.


1

I did also some research on this and decided to go with this solution. This fan only measures 50x50x10mm and is easy flippable: https://de.aliexpress.com/item/1005001894771961.html Another option was this: https://de.aliexpress.com/item/4001185014078.html Also found a Thingi, where people tried to flip the existing 5015 blower fans. It seems very difficult,...


1

Late to the party but still... The noise could be caused by the lubrication of the fan ...when you turn on the fan, the lubrication is seated down. As the fan spins, the lubrication gets all over the bearing thus centering the fan reducing the vibrations aka noise.


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