26

No, due to 3 reasons PET is not (easily) printable. There is a lot of confusion on what Filaments you can buy: most times filament branded PET is actually PETG, sometimes PETT. PET is not an easily printable material at all. With expert knowledge and the right machine settings it can be printed, but even then, it is not as easily recyclable into a useable 3D-...


22

There is very little information about safety available, as home 3D printers are relatively new. However, plastics such as ABS have a long history in making plastic products, and a study found that at traditional manufacturing methods (such as injection molding and hot wire cutting) do not release dangerous levels of carcinogens and/or respiratory ...


22

When you slice an STL of a heat tower, you need to tell the slicer that you need a different temperature at a certain level and maintain that new temperature until another change is requested. The way I usually do it is by using a post processing script in Ulltimaker Cura, but you can do it yourself quite easily by changing the G-code file manually. To get ...


21

Ok, I tried all 3 materials. PLA failed after less then one day, I believe it deformed from the constant pressure and fell out (I didn't find the part but I didn't really search for it, there's some tall grass below the window) ABS lasted about a year, it fell strait down and I found the part, it looks ok if probably deformed by just a few mm so it doesn't ...


19

If you feel you need to clean the nozzle the best approach is a cold pull. You can perform this procedure with many printers, however, you should seek advice from your printer manufacturer before attempting this process if you have any doubts. With the previously filament still loaded and the tool head cold: Begin to raise the temperature of the tool to ...


17

Almost all 3D printers have issues that could cause health problems. FDM/FFF printers heat plastic to a temperature that may cause it to off-gas, and these byproducts may not be healthy. SLA printers often use epoxies that may off-gas, or may be somewhat toxic prior to being cured. Powder based printers can also off-gas, in addition to the powder itself ...


13

PLA would be a non-starter for outdoor use as it's biodegradable and can breakdown in sunlight. Albeit slowly, but won't be useful for long term project. ABS would be a good choice for longevity, as it can last in outdoor situations for quite a while. Its glass transition temperature is above 100 degrees celsius so it'll last in most climates. As for ...


12

PETG is great stuff to work with. It is stronger than ABS also. It prints slower than ABS and PLA. The formulas vary quite a bit from vendor to vendor. I have used 3 brands, and each of their properties vary. From my experience you do have to be careful with moisture. You'll be able to tell you have moisture in your filament if you start hearing a slight ...


12

I have never used ABS, because I have a young child at home and no ventilation system (just to be safe). I have however used PETG, a crystal clear brand competitively priced on AMA-ssive online retailer, I loved it and will probably only buy it in the future. Advantages Noted: There is no odor I could detect It is remarkably clear, like glass using a large ...


12

Polypropylene CAN be printed with excellent results, you just need a good filament roll and good printing setup. A few days ago I read this topic and was kind of afraid of testing it, now I am so happy I tried it. I am printing the PP filament from the brand Smart Materials 3D (search on google). I am using a Prusa i3 Mk2, bed heated to 70ºC and hotend to ...


11

It's not hollow or enclosed structures that are a problem. It's structures that are hollow and enclosed. Think about it. The machine lays down a thin layer of powder, and then a laser fuses some of that powder together to make a shape. Then, it repeats the process for the next layer. If you try to build, for example, a hollow ball, the ball gets created in ...


10

I am going to address the air issue as it is currently unresolved. the third dimension offers a great answer for common safety issues. The short answer is that based on our limited knowledge at this point, there may be imperceptible health hazards related to FDM / FFF printers and therefore additional safety precautions are, in my opinion, necessary and not ...


9

I can't answer this from a technical 3D printing angle. But, from a musical angle: Where the body of an instrument has the primary function of enclosing a vibrating air column, the material has often been demonstrated to perhaps make a difference, but only a subtle one. As an example, a recent range of plastic trombones, although not first-class ...


9

Let's start with the general design look and feel: This printer contains a robotic arm with a toolhead, pretty similar to a welding robot, and probably is controlled with a similar CAM software. Picture by Robotics.org Tool head The really interesting part here is the tool head. So let's look at it and try to reverse engineer the use of some parts by how ...


8

In most cases, removing the old filament from the printer, inserting the new filament in, and running the new filament through the printer for a short period of time will clean the nozzle. The skirt of the print can also be a time during the actual print for the old filament to be flushed. Assuming the skirt is long enough, all that needs to be done is the ...


8

I might be late to the party, but I have a suggestion. Why not use ASA filament, it's the kind of plastic used in car cup holders, lawn rakes and sprinkler heads, it is both heat and cold resistant, as well as solar stable and weatherproof. As far as printing with it it is similar to printing in ABS as far as I am aware, I might be wrong though. I personally ...


8

Yes, you can. But no, you don't need to make your own filament for it, there is one called Print2Cast that you can buy for about 50$/kg. This filament has the following recommended slicing settings: Extrusion temperature: 140°C-150°C Bed temperature: 80°-90°C Shells: 2-3 (for most models) Print speed: 20 to 70mm/s There are, however, a few more things to ...


8

Following up on this, the answer is, yes, this works quite well. I printed this cabaça model from Thingiverse using PLA on a Lulzbot Mini and put it on my berimbau today to test it out. I can't make a direct comparison because the printed resonator is smaller than the gourd one that I own, but the sound is good. I am not certain whether it is actually ...


8

What you describe is usually the result of using a too high of a part cooling fan rotational speed. Like ABS, PETG doesn't require much cooling (if needed at all that is). If you do cool too much, layers and perimeters do not bond optimally (you can get string cheese like printed parts on failure). Why should you use cooling for PETG? Cooling helps cool ...


8

Injection molding requires two major components: pressure and heat. So your question can be broken down into those two halves: can your average extruder handle injection molding temperatures, and can it handle injection molding pressures? Let's start with pressure. Per this page on the University of Minnesota's site, plastic injection molding tends to ...


7

You're on the right track. Since you asked for "steps" here you go: Step 1. Choose a safe material: Consider chemical safety and physical safety. Food grade PLA should be chemically safe, but could be too brittle depending on the design you choose. PETG, T-Glase, or similar filaments (depending on dye) are normally also chemically safe and are less ...


7

Polypropylene is a bear to print. There's a good reason almost nobody does it. The main problem is that it's a semi-crystalline material, which means it doesn't follow the normal rules for warping prevention. An amorphous polymer like ABS or PET is able to slowly flow or creep until it cools below the glass point, Tg. This means the stresses caused by ...


7

This looks a lot like under extrusion caused by heat creep. Heat creep is when the nozzle temperature 'creeps' up through the filament and makes it melt (a bit) and form a blob (or just widen enough to get stuck) a centimeter or two before the nozzle. The characteristic is usually that everything works perfectly well for some quite fix amount of time, then ...


7

Design a different connection to the shaft, however I don't know of any Use a shaft/flange coupler to be fastened to your shaft and to your printed part. Without knowing the length of the shaft, you could connect a flange/coupler to design this into your gear. This is a good solution if you have to transmit larger torques. See e.g. this pulley that ...


6

A few things are required for effective extrusion-style 3d printing materials: It must stay where placed by the nozzle long enough to harden (or, alternately for pastes and such, have a shear-thinning or thixotropic viscous profile so it will not flow under its own weight). If using a filament extruder, it must have a wide range of viscosity that varies ...


6

In addition to what @AsaDeDeBuck said, PETG is also more flexible than PLA, and less stinky than ABS. Furthermore, some PETG variants like to accumulate on the nozzle (particulate build up) and then char a bit before being deposited at some random spot on the object.


6

PETG is great, but definitely not as easy to print as PLA. However the advantages of higher impact resistance, temperature resistance and longevity make it superior to PLA for parts that require those properties. ABS is even harder to print than PETG and has worse strength and layer adhesion so no reason to bother with it in my opinion. I print PETG at 80°...


6

Yes, with the proper equipment. Printing wax filament (at 51 seconds): https://youtu.be/tibkVZB_n9c?t=51s There are also options for melting wax, filling a heated reservoir head, and printing with that. I recommend doing this with a cold ambient temperature, so that the wax solidifies quickly. There's no point in just printing a puddle. :)


6

Here is a great answer to the underlying physics of resonance: "A object rings because it has acquired energy in a way that it resonates - it vibrates at a frequency and with enough energy to generate sound waves. As long as the object has sufficient energy, it will continue to ring. It cannot ring forever as the sound waves gradually reduce the amount of ...


6

You won't need specialized nozzles, you understand the material wrong: The benefit the properties of this material grant is not super fine prints (which you can get with small nozzles like 0.1 mm already), it is that you can print at super low temperatures. Printing it at standard 200°C will mean, that it won't solidify in the time the printer needs it to, ...


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