26

No, due to 3 reasons PET is not (easily) printable. There is a lot of confusion on what Filaments you can buy: most times filament branded PET is actually PETG, sometimes PETT. PET is not an easily printable material at all. With expert knowledge and the right machine settings it can be printed, but even then, it is not as easily recyclable into a useable 3D-...


22

When you slice an STL of a heat tower, you need to tell the slicer that you need a different temperature at a certain level and maintain that new temperature until another change is requested. The way I usually do it is by using a post processing script in Ulltimaker Cura, but you can do it yourself quite easily by changing the G-code file manually. To get ...


21

Layer Times See my answer to this question and pay particular attention to my suggestion about a minimum layer print time. I'm not sure if all slicing engines provide this option, but I know MakerWare/MakerBot Desktop and (possibly) Slic3r allow this setting. Basically, when you're extruding smaller features like this, the previous layer(s) are still very ...


20

This is going to become a 3-step answer, as 3D Printing uses 3 different steps: Design, Slicing & Material choice before I elaborate alternate ways to some fair dice. Yet, we start with the material, as we need to know about it first. In this case it does impact everything from design to slicing and the print. Variant A: Printed perfect(?) Step 1: Know ...


14

Without going into too much detail, since this is a very exhaustive topic, I'll write some pro's of each down from the top of my head: Cartesian XZ hotend, Y bed (eg. Prusa Mendel): easy to build (relatively) easy to maintain easy to modify understandable kinematics with the right frame, no x-y-z orthogonality (90 degree angles) needs to be adjusted ...


12

Polypropylene CAN be printed with excellent results, you just need a good filament roll and good printing setup. A few days ago I read this topic and was kind of afraid of testing it, now I am so happy I tried it. I am printing the PP filament from the brand Smart Materials 3D (search on google). I am using a Prusa i3 Mk2, bed heated to 70ºC and hotend to ...


11

The two most important things you can do are: Provide adequate cooling to solidify the plastic quickly Minimize layer height Cooling is really obvious. You need the plastic to solidify before it has a chance to sag. PLA in particular has to shed a lot of heat before it is fully solid. A fan and air guide setup using a "squirrel-cage" radial blower around ...


11

After much trial and error, I think I finally figured out the solution. Even though I could get better prints by tweaking with the temperatures, I could never totally eliminate the problem. The better I made it look by cooling down the bed, the more likely it would break free and the print would fail completely. At one point though I happened to print ...


11

The phenomenon you experience is called under-extrusion. Under-extrusion is the effect of extruding lesser filament than required for the print. The result of under-extrusion (depending on the amount of under-extrusion) can be described as spongy prints, gaps in prints/layers, failed prints, etc. As the amount of plastic flow is less than required for the ...


10

Assuming your filament dimension settings are correct and your extruder is correctly calibrated... Your extruder temperature may be too low. While 184C can be hot enough, it is very near the bottom of the range for PLA and it appears your filament isn't melting quickly enough to keep up with your other settings. Your extruder may even be running slightly ...


10

Ghosting is an artefact in the print due to the vibrations in the printer that are induced by rapid changes of direction. It is important not to confuse them with inherent vibrations in the printer due for example to the belts being loose or the bearings not being in perfect order. The good news is that it is relatively easy to tell them apart: ghosting (...


10

Filament expands as it gets hot. Cooling the filament will make it shrink, so cooling the filament deposited on the bed can lead to adhesion problems and warping of your products. This is exactly the reason why you use a heated bed (the delta temperature is smaller). So keep the cooling off for the first layers and you'll be fine. Additionally (having ...


9

Printing temperature basics Manufacturers generally specify a somewhat wide range of printing temperatures, and what temperature you should actually need can only be determined by trial and error: The thermistor in your hotend is not 100 % accurate and may have an offset of a few degrees compared to its actual temperature. Your hotend has a small ...


9

Everybody's combination of fan hardware and print settings is different. Unless someone else has the exact same printer and slicer profiles as you, there's no way to really say anything like "use X% for PLA" or whatever. For practical purposes, you just empirically figure it out with test prints based on a few simple rules of thumb: Use lots of cooling for ...


9

Your nozzle is too far from your bed. The first layer isn't squished down sufficiently, resulting in these gaps. If your first layer looks like this, you should cancel your print and adjust the bed. Alternatively, you can adjust the initial height of the Z-axis in G-code (for instance, G0 Z-0.1 followed by G92 Z0, which should be appended to your start G-...


9

Retraction is the reversal of the direction of the filament and is generally used when moving from one non-contiguous point of the print to another, in order to prevent stringing and oozing of the filament. If retraction is not employed then the filament still coming out of the nozzle, after the last point was printed (and paused), will stretch, thus ...


8

1) If we're talking about FFF/FDM printers: Accuracy of the electronics and motors allows it, yes. But how FDM printers work it might be very hard to lay down layers of molten plastic so small as to preserve little details in the X and Y axis, not much of a problem doing 20 micron layer height though (Z resolution). Check this answer to find out what the X ...


8

Cool environmental conditions are the single biggest contributor to ABS delamination. Delamination or edge/corner cracking is caused by warping stresses when the first layer adhesion is stronger than the interlayer bonding. Or it happens when the heated build plate allows a strong non-warping foundation to be built until the print is too tall to be ...


8

PLA absorbs moisture, so keeping the filament dry is a key factor. Aside from that, PLA is naturally more brittle than other plastics like ABS and Nylon Sorry, tried to find a graph to prove it, but couldn't find one. There's a good Google Group discussion and many other resources that go over good storage habits, but as for fixing the existing filament. ...


8

Your print isn't cooling fast enough. With small, thin prints like this, PLA needs a fair bit of airflow to solidify before the next layer goes down. Your printer doesn't appear to have a proper print-cooling fan, so I have two suggestions: Print two or even three of the part at the same time, spaced a fair distance apart on the build plate. This will give ...


8

Thermal conductivity of brass is approximately twice as better than steel (not stainless). Given that the size of nozzle is relatively small, it should be able to transfer enough heat for a medium-speed prints at least. I have printed PLA and ABS using "steel" nozzle (brand of steel unknown) at the speed around 80 mm/s without any visible ...


8

My3dmatter.com performed a series of tests with PLA, using "a universal testing machine". They conclude: Layer height influences the strength of a printed part when it becomes thin. A printed part at 0.1mm shows a max stress of only 29MPa, as opposed to 35MPa for 0.2mm (21% increase). Past 0.2mm, the max stress remains fairly constant around 36 ...


8

As Trish states, a print service would appear to be your best bet. Building a printer large enough may work out costing more than the print service, especially if it is only for one print of a proof of concept. Anecdotally, I visited a 3D Printing shop in Bangkok, JWH High tech Garden, that had a huge Delta printer that had, reputably, cost a million baht (~...


8

There are several factors playing together. For example orientation, printer & slicer settings and more. Reminder First of all, not all overhangs of greater than 45° need support. Many printers manage up to 60°, even 70° is not unheard of - with the right settings. Pretty much all printers manage tiny 90° overhangs. U-Bowls (open side up) Let's look at ...


7

Polypropylene is a bear to print. There's a good reason almost nobody does it. The main problem is that it's a semi-crystalline material, which means it doesn't follow the normal rules for warping prevention. An amorphous polymer like ABS or PET is able to slowly flow or creep until it cools below the glass point, Tg. This means the stresses caused by ...


7

The main issue with very narrow extrusion widths (less than the nozzle size) is that you get really poor "nozzle squash." The plastic isn't pressed down very hard as it's extruded. That causes poor layer bonding and weaker prints. The flow of molten plastic coming out of the nozzle must be drawn down by tension in order to end up smaller than the nozzle ...


7

Yes this is possible. For an FDM/FFF printer, you'll need to print with supports. I might also recommend printing in PLA to minimize the chance of warping during the print (from experience). It might also help to slow down the feedrate to ensure smooth surface finish and avoiding delamination on such small layers. You'll probably see a decrease in the ...


7

Oh yeah, that's simple. You are printing too hot and are literally boiling the plastic. Else you have water. However if it was water you would hear Crackling as it printed. If it is too hot you will not hear nearly as much. I am 87.341% sure you are printing too hot. Looking at your printing temps you are without a doubt printing too hot. From this link on ...


7

This looks a lot like under extrusion caused by heat creep. Heat creep is when the nozzle temperature 'creeps' up through the filament and makes it melt (a bit) and form a blob (or just widen enough to get stuck) a centimeter or two before the nozzle. The characteristic is usually that everything works perfectly well for some quite fix amount of time, then ...


7

I experienced that several times if my print temperature was too low. Then, the filament does not stick to the plate very well and prefers to stick to the nozzle which pulls it away. Solution is to increase the temperature by 5 to 10 degrees, at least for the first layers..


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