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Taken from a rejected suggested edit. If the author (Gareth) posts their own answer, this can be deleted, or flagged for deletion My Ender 3 is not warped in any way but there are several issues I needed to address: Extrusion: Check your extruder and Z eSteps for accuracy, as detailed in numerous places. Test layer width: print a cube in vase mode (1 shell ...


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This is caused by insufficient support under the whole chin, incorrect slicer settings and the fact that the chin is an overhang than isn't connected to the model at the lower layers (this means that an island is printed in a sea of support that later becomes a peninsula). The model is a Pokenmon called Dragonite which was found on Thingiverse. When sliced ...


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A clear answer is not available, since no one performed a proper test as of June 2021. The closest answer I can provide is that damping feet result in a change of vibration behaviour, as discussed in this Klipper issue report. How it's not clear. I paste some of the findings: I took several measurements with different configurations and the results are ...


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You need to zoom in on the layers where the support is being generated and check if there is actually support being generated under that area. Additionally, I noticed your support generation setting is "Touching build plate only". You should change this setting to 'everywhere' because it could be that build plate support cannot directly reach the ...


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I see that you have a minimum support angle of 60 degrees -- that may mean Cura Slicer isn't generating supports for that chin. Try changing this minimum to a lower figure -- 51 degrees or lower. From what I've read, most filaments and settings will allow 60 degrees with PLA, but this is the easy first thing to try to get that chin supported. On looking at ...


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Seeing the infill from the outside is usually caused by having a thin wall or an incorrect wall thickness compared to your nozzle. Wall thickness should be a multiple of your nozzle diameter; so a .4 mm nozzle should have 0.4, 0.8, 1.2 mm thicknesses. The following list of solutions is from All3DP's article "Troubleshooting Common 3D Printing Problems&...


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I think it's safe to say that there's at least one model of 3D printer that works in microgravity -- since one was sent to the International Space Station a few months ago. I presume the one there is an FDM type, as those need not be dependent on gravity; my Ender 3, for instance, has positive drive both ways on all three axes, so as long as the filament ...


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SLA printing wouldn't just work on earth, it just needs some sort of gravitational pull just to keep the liquid down. On the other hand, "normal" 3D printing in theory could print upside down, sideways or in 0 gravity because the process that takes to print is it squishes melted filament down onto other filament that has been melted and cooled or ...


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Since it happens in the same place each time, it's either G-code or mechanical. I've seen things like this happen with dirty gantries, or a dirty Z-axis guide. If it's not mechanical, there may be something in the G-code that causes it, such as too many retractions in one area, or similar.


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Lulzbot used to do this at trade shows -- printers on their side, printing all day long. So long as it sticks to the bed, and sticks to the subsequent layers of the part, it works. The determining factor is gravity -- if the part being printed has overhangs or unsupported areas, the extruded material would fall back at the extruder, instead of down onto the ...


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Barrel's answer is absolutely correct, provided the printer doesn't have gratuitous dependencies on gravity. For example, a lot of high-end CoreXY designs I've seen, with 3 Z motors for automatic true leveling, rely on gravity to move/hold the bed in the -Z direction and only drive the +Z direction. This is often done for the purpose of decoupling from error ...


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There are several different ways you can go about doing this You could calibrate your printer/software better that way so the slicer can make better gcode files that are best fit for you printer Take a lighter to the edge and scrape everything off, this really helps for if your print gets really stringy, this balls all of the strings up and you can scrape ...


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In some cases, you can remove sharp edges in the CAD model before printing. Outside corners can be rounded, inside corners can be filleted. This also can strengthen the part in some cases. Older printers and software did not handle corners well, and so accidentally rounded corners. Newer printers that use controlled acceleration can make much sharper ...


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