21

From a general point of view, there are a few things to consider. If you buy a kit: Pros: You get some insurance that you have all the parts that you need to get a functional printer - all the electronics, structure, bolts, nuts, screws, washers, wires and so on. Most likely, all the parts you get are made to fit together. You will (usually) get a manual, ...


11

You will certainly find that the print functionality of a 3d printer is a bit more complex than you suggest. The mechanical portions include a means to push the filament into a heated nozzle as well as the software portion to regulate the speed of the filament movement. You haven't referenced the heater cartridge and temperature sensor, but you will discover ...


10

Steel is the best material for a linear rod when you have a fixed cross-section. It will have the least flex of any rod (aside from some exotic metals) of the same size. Carbon fiber's material properties might seem superior at first sight, but the stiffness is very anisotropic -- it's very stiff along the grain and not very stiff across the grain. So ...


10

In the diagram, they do show the wires connecting together, which is right. You can accomplish that just about any way you like, so long as you pair up the wires correctly from one motor to the other. I'm assuming both "Z" motors are the same type and have the same color-coding for their wires. If not, you'll need to figure out the correspondences first (...


10

I built my first printer from scratch, though it's fairly similar to an oversize MendelMax 2. It was a good learning experience, but very frustrating at times. Overall, I think I'm glad I did it that way, but a kit would have gotten me printing much faster and a bit cheaper. Here are my main impressions from the experience... You should already be familiar ...


10

While the "best" method is probably unanswerable since it would be based on very specific requirements and subject to change as soon as a better method were devised, here are some feasible methods to auto-eject 3d printed parts. Some of these are methods that I've considered for my personal use, others have been mentioned by others and added for helpful ...


8

For some unknown reason, everywhere everybody is saying that Z stepper motors need to be connected in parallel... And this was always the only obvious way, until recently some people started to connect these motors in series. And I personally started to believe the right way is to connect them in series. All stepstick drivers are some kind of current ...


8

I agree that steel is the best material for rails but the info provided on carbon fiber is just wrong. When making a carbon fiber part, whether a tube or any other shape, you lay the fabric in the orientation you need for the direction of the forces. If multi-directional strength and stiffness is needed then the fibers are laid in multiple directions. ...


7

Aluminum of almost every grade is very easy to cut with a hacksaw. I would suggest to mark clearly the cut line and to wrap masking tape at the edge of the cut. Consider to allow for about 2-3 millimeters (1/16") extra material for final finishing. Cut across the line, rotate the part ninety degrees and cut again. Once you have the guide cuts in place, you ...


7

If by components you mean motors, fans, or heated bed, then yes. This is even suggested in the Final Setup instructions on the RAMPS wiki. If you think you may have mistakes (in your setup) you can install only one stepper driver during initial testing and risk only one stepper driver. There are also printers using RAMPS with no heated bed and other ...


7

I have a dual extruder Replicator 1 and having the nozzles at the same height is a must and albeit a bit of a struggle otherwise. At one point, I had to disassemble my extruder head and the nozzles didn't line up quite right. There after, printing with the lower one obviously didn't have any troubles, however, printing with the high extruder made it so the ...


7

In principle you only need the minimum axis position (or the maximum), the offset to the bed and the size of the bed in the direction of the axes. Fortunately, you can specify this in the firmware: E.g. in Marlin Firmware offsets are defined as travel limits: // Travel limits (mm) after homing, corresponding to endstop positions. #define X_MIN_POS -33 #...


6

Yes, look at http://reprap.org for a project that's been doing what you're asking about for about a decade now.


6

A few months ago I bought a cheap (220 USD) Prusa i3 kit from China and put it together. Putting it together was fun and still a bit of a challenge. It was also nice to have pre-configured firmware already loaded onto the Melzi board that came with it. So for the downside: The board (Melzi) that came in the kit only supports one extruder so if I want to add ...


6

The main consideration when building the body/frame of a 3D printer is the stiffness. The stiffer the material, the less the frame will deform under load, and the more accurate and repeatable your results will be. UHMW has a Tensile Modulus of Elasticity around 120,000 psi (http://www.polytechindustrial.com/products/plastic-stock-shapes/uhmw-polyethylene) ...


6

To answer the main question "Is ABS better for structural parts of a 3D printer as opposed to PLA". The answer, unfortunately is it depends. ABS has lower yield and ultimate strengths compared to PLA. This means that at room temperatures, ABS is weaker than PLA. However the difference between yield and ultimate for ABS is much larger than PLA, meaning that ...


6

Building a 3-D printer is actually very easy, assuming that you are electronically and mechanically competent, and there are a whole bunch of websites devoted to doing just that. The principal of which would be the RepRapWiki. There are a number of different designs, mostly from a few basic designs: Cartesian Delta Polar Scara Take a look at 3D Printers ...


6

My question is a ball screw of pitch 4mm or 5mm, will it be able to Maintain it's position when motor is deenergized under a load of 15 kg shared by two systems. The detent torque of a typical NEMA 23 stepper varies between around 3 and 7 N·cm. This is the torque produced when the windings are not energized. Using this leadscrew torque calculator, you can ...


5

Looking at the specs for both the GT2 belt and the Synchromesh I'm very hesitant to recommend a Synchromesh over a belt. The first thing that sticks out is that there are both error and cumulative error specifications for the Synchromesh. For a device like a 3D printer, I don't like the idea that of my axes can accumulate up to ±0.16 in. of error over 100 ...


5

With a belt system, the belt engages roughly half the pulley. This, and the tension in the belt, ensures the belt always engages the pulley tightly. A belt and pulley system is thus relatively forgiving. With a rack and pinion system, only a few teeth engage at any given time. To avoid backlash and get the same kind of "tight" engagement, both the gear and ...


5

From Accuracy vs Precision and Threaded Rod vs Leadscrews in 3D Printers. I have highlighted the relevant parts: In general, FFF/FDM printers use relatively infrequent, small, precise movements on the z-axis and consistent, fast movements on the x and y axes. A single start leadscrew with the tightest pitch possible (highest thread density, smallest pitch) ...


5

Hard to say for sure - my whole printer is cheap parts bought as a kit in China by a Chinese student who abandoned it in the US (I resurrected it after it was abandoned.) It includes all the parts you list, and I think we finally sorted out what the thermistor actually is so the temperatures are more accurate now. It prints. Could it print better? - ...


5

as long as you match the parts that is ok. The m8 rod will give you more stiffness and will be harder to bend. As the result, you will have to calibrate the steps/mm settings in the firmware.


5

No, Printers are not good sources Common printers contain at best one stepper motor in the scanner, and it is usually too weak for use as an X or Y stepper, but for a very slow printer they might be useable, especially if you could source 2 or 4 of the same type. The main motors in the printer are almost universally DC motors that get their turning signal as ...


5

At a nearly microscopic level, the herringbone belt/gear combination will reduce the whoosh effect of a square profile cogged belt forcing itself into a matching profile pulley. Consider a well-sealed drawer or similar shape. Push it into the cabinet at maximum speed and force and the air is going to have a difficult time exiting. By the design of the ...


5

The UK uses 230 V mains voltage. The 220 V designation is from the past, Europe is now using 230 V. You do not have to worry about the frequency. You should place the switch to 220 V and plug the cord into the socket. The printer should start immediately booting (cycling) the printer firmware, the LCD should light up and the cold end ...


4

No doubt it's just a final tuning potentiometer. Even on the pictures you linked it's described as V adj which stands for voltage adjustment. It's a way to tune your power supply's output as it can vary depending on temperature/humidity/wall-plug voltage/etc. It's usually set properly and doesn't need to be touched. But you can connect a multimeter to check ...


4

An alternative solution that is used with some Kossel Mini models, is a simple cardboard covered with aluminum tape (docs). This solution has the added benefit of actually improving heat-up time, since the reflective surface of the aluminum tape reflects the heat back into the bed, instead of getting absorbed. It is also a very simple solution, without ...


4

I don't have dual extruder printer myself, but to my understanding having both nozzles leveled at the same height is critical for getting successful prints. For typical FDM printers, the lowest point of the end effector should always be the nozzle. If you, for instance, mount a fan lower than the tip of your nozzle, it will eventually collide with the ...


4

Very basically speaking, electricity works like this: There's some source that delivers a certain voltage. You have a device that operates at a certain voltage. The device voltage and supply voltage should always match. No, don't put that 120V US device in a 230V outlet in Europe. The device does something. By doing something it draws current. Most devices ...


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