8

The first is not suitable. ASTM96TS Sn96Ag4 has a melting point of 221–229 °C according to Wikipedia. Pb96Ag4 would be OK, but that is not lead free so doesn't seem to match your description. Update from comment to explain the letters and numbers: the data comes from wikipedia, the numbers are Tin(Sn) 62%, Pb(Lead) 36%, Ag(Silver) 2%, for example, ...


8

If your multimeter can handle the voltage, it should be safe. 12 V should be in the capability range of common multimeters, so I would tend to say yes, - but make sure that your multimeter can handle the voltage and be sure it is set to voltage mode in the appropriate range (if set to current measurement mode for example, it will not survive). Also ...


8

No, do not use this fuse. The current rating is too high to be reasonable for your printer. It will "work" in the sense that your printer will get power, but it won't provide anywhere near as much protection as a lower-rated fuse. 10A is a lot of current for mains voltage. Depending on what else you have plugged in, there is a fair chance your home's 15A ...


7

If by components you mean motors, fans, or heated bed, then yes. This is even suggested in the Final Setup instructions on the RAMPS wiki. If you think you may have mistakes (in your setup) you can install only one stepper driver during initial testing and risk only one stepper driver. There are also printers using RAMPS with no heated bed and other ...


7

I want to add some points and clarifications to the answer that @darthpixel already has given. Most information you need is in there, I want to give some more practical advice, since that is what I understand you're question is asking for. I'll start with some points on the more theoretical side, though: notice that the Vref is not a voltage that is passed ...


6

There are a number of things to consider: Wire Gauge: a typical 40W, 12V heater draws around 3A. 24 AWG or lower would be appropriate (copper wire, CCA will require thicker gauge). Insulation: the part of the wire close to the resistor leads might get too hot for conventional PVC installation. Consider using silicone, teflon or glass fiber insulation ...


6

A MK2 heatbed will draw around 12A. The motors and hotend draw only very little power (around 2A, 5A peak), so the 30A supply you have has significant headroom (it is often recommended to derate a power supply by 20%, so a 30A supply would be good for 24A - you're still well under that). It should work fine, even given its dubious provenance. Winter versus ...


6

Generally speaking voltage on stepstick output should be around 1V. To imagine more or less what the current and what the voltage is, you can think about it in the same way as about water. The wire is more or less the same as the pipe. The voltage can be imagined as (sort of) the height from which the water flows but the current can be imagined as an ...


6

I want to add the following to the already direct and very good answer of @Dani Epstein. It does not answer your question, but hopefully may help many people who are reading the question when choosing between the two materials. Acrylic is less stable and will probably wear off faster than a well-built MDF frame for a 3D printer! I will address the points ...


5

Generally speaking, MDF will weather OK. In areas of high humidity you might experience warpage, but you can mitigate that by sealing the surface with paint or varnish. However you will probably find that of the two materials, acrylic will be more stable over a few years.


5

You stated your print of a 20mm cube came out spot on so I will rule out any z-axis configuration issues. It clearly seems like you are extruding too much plastic. I use slic3r myself with repetier so I am familiar with the settings. Print Settings - Advanced All the values should be 0 except first layer sometimes is 100%-200% depending on your personal ...


4

From an electrical standpoint, a two-phase stepper motors (what most 3D printers use) works the same backwards and forwards, the phase just reverses. If you are stalling on only one direction, I would look to see if you have a mechanical bind in that direction. Generally a wiring issue will cause the motor to either not run at all or to run in the wrong ...


4

Use ferrules to join wires, and on your board either solder directly (it doesn't matter what solder you use because it's not going to get hot if your wires are gauged properly). Or use soft copper wires and clamping terminals without the wires being tinned or risk a fire hazard. Tinning makes the surface harder which makes for less contact area. If it ...


4

This is referred to as a Terminal Block Connector. More specifically this is a 2-position pluggable terminal block connector commonly manufactured by Phoenix Contact and others. Newark.com Sale Page: Pluggable Terminal Block, 5.08 mm, 2 Positions, 24 AWG, 12 AWG, 2.5 mm², Screw Larger Picture: 2-Position Terminal Block Connectors


4

Yes, you can. By leaving components unplugged you would simply have some pins powered that are not in use. But even with all your components plugged in, you would still have some unused, powered pins on your board, so I wouldn't think too hard about that. In some cases it might be needed to mount e.i. fans to cool your electronics while running, but for ...


4

It looks like the hotend may not be all the way in, are you sure it's not stuck? If it's stuck and you can get it in further, those holes should go directly through the smaller ring on top of the J-Head. You just need to run a machine screw into each hole to secure the hotend. The screw will need to at least be flush with the other side to work correctly.


4

You can send the G Codes to select and print a file over the serial connection. List the files M20 Select a file name M23 filename.gco Start/Resue the print M24 See https://reprap.org/wiki/G-code for more information M20 through M39 are the ones for interfacing with SD Card files.


3

As others have also said, this is generally fine. The main things I'd avoid are: Don't plug or unplug "heavy" items (mainly motors and heaters) with power on; turn everything off first. This is especially true for motors, whose coils produce a hefty back-voltage when disconnected. Be extra careful about stepper drivers. For example, some printers use 2 ...


3

The website shows exactly what each wire is for. Both middle wires are ground, the wire on the same side as the lever is the signal wire and the last wire is the power wire.


3

The multiple connections are redundant. Your picture indicates the wires labelled as "SIGNAL, GND, GND, VCC". This is correct if the board is a "standard" mechanical endstop v1.2. The two middle pins are both ground, but you only need to use one of them. You can simply connect signal to signal and ground to ground. That is sufficient for the endstop to work....


2

The power supply that you posted is 12v 360w. This means that (in the USA with 120v power), it will draw 3 amps at 120v. Your switch is rated for 10A at 250V so it works. The switch should be placed to interrupt the HOT wire coming from the wall to your power supply. If you happen to be using 240v power, it is also safe as you would be drawing 1.5 amps ...


2

At 250V a rating for 10A means 2500 Watts, which is fairly enough to use with a typical 3D printer. Make sure that the wire you use to connect the switch to the power supply can also take the current you need. Easiest way to get a cable that is safe to use is salvaging a mains cable from other devices. I would not use wires that were made for low power use ...


2

You should: Ensure that firmware has proper thermistor configuration. For details see this video tutorial. Verify that your thermistor works properly. Measure voltage on it. It should be around 5V on this particular board. There is possibility that the board is defective. Replace it. Temperature sensor possibilities for Marlin firmware: // -2 is ...


2

I've used a similar cheap psu before. It'll work without blowing up but my heatbed struggled to get up to 60c, swapped psus with one I had lying around from a desktop and there was a huge difference.


2

Running this kind of test isn't really necessary; it provides a nice test to see if everything is working but so does uploading actual firmware (and this isn't any safer than traditional firmware, at that). It looks like it runs the steppers in one direction for 5 seconds and then in reverse for 5, which should be more than enough to see them move even with ...


2

The heated bed is a big PCB whose traces can act like a coil since heating the bed makes current flow through these traces. By placing a metal object over it, you encounter a phenomenon called induction which will heat up the metal object (that can be the screwdriver tip) because the magnetic field generated by the "coil" of the heat bed. Since these ...


2

I can't comment yet, but for those wondering, the issue with tinning the wires is when you are clamping them. Tinning them actually increases the resistance between the wires and terminal, due to making them harder and not getting squished out to make more contact with the terminal. This increased resistance means increased heat, and enough heat means fire. ...


2

Consider the original installation with the orientation of the Pinda probe to the nozzle. Let's say for argument's sake that the Pinda probe is 3 mm to the right and directly in line with the nozzle on the y axis. If you examine your new nozzle, I would expect that the relationship of the nozzle to the Pinda probe no longer matches the original spacing. If ...


1

Sounds like you are configured for NC switches but are using NO switches, causing them to invert their reported state. Issue a M119 command and see if the endstop statuses are correct when none are triggered.


1

Try setting your "First Layer Height" to 0. This should resolve the issue and will make homing your Z axis a bit easier.


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