Hot answers tagged

16

Stringing is often a result of too-high a temperature, or insufficient retraction. When there is highly liquid filament in the nozzle tip, it can adhere to the remainder of the print while dripping as the nozzle moves, leading to a thin string of the filament forming. As further travel moves are performed in each layer, this turns to a web. The high ...


15

The biggest effect I've see on resolution is due to plastic stress due to thermal gradients. The higher resolution prints build up more layers of material, and each layer has a cumulative effect on thermal stress. The upper layers pulling up more as they cool, and the lower layers curling up more strongly as the layer count is increased. To counteract ...


12

There are some different criteria that we should use to select a switch type: Precision / repeatability: does the switch trigger at the same place every time? How much spread is there in the trigger position? Do environmental changes or machine setting changes affect the trigger position? Contact distance: does the switch register with enough clearance to ...


12

well... it's hard to imagine printing M3 or even M4 I haven't try but I haven't because I'm pretty sure it's not possible (on my printer of course) but some time ago I've tried M8 which is of course way from your needs it was printed on 0.1mm layer height it went ok into the nut without any problems but the strength is not very high I suppose I know the ...


9

Here's just a few of the things you might want to look into. plastic - some plastic types are more stringy than others and there's also variation between brands and colors. moisture in filament - water turning to steam tends to cause the extruder to ooze when it isn't printing, which can cause stringing. temperature - too hot or too cold can cause ...


9

I believe the Slic3r Manual summarizes this quite nicely: A thicker layer height will provide more flow, and consequently more heat, making the extrusion adhere to the bed more. It also gives the benefit of giving more tolerance for the levelness of the bed. It is recommended to raise the first layer height to match the diameter of the nozzle, e.g. a ...


9

I can't answer this from a technical 3D printing angle. But, from a musical angle: Where the body of an instrument has the primary function of enclosing a vibrating air column, the material has often been demonstrated to perhaps make a difference, but only a subtle one. As an example, a recent range of plastic trombones, although not first-class ...


8

You could experiment with slicing. For example, you might not need high resolution all over the object, but you can speed up some straight parts by using greater layer high there. See a part of Slic3r manual about such thing. It is also possible to print thicker infill every Nth layer, see Infill optimization in Slic3r. Other slicers might have those ...


8

Following up on this, the answer is, yes, this works quite well. I printed this cabaça model from Thingiverse using PLA on a Lulzbot Mini and put it on my berimbau today to test it out. I can't make a direct comparison because the printed resonator is smaller than the gourd one that I own, but the sound is good. I am not certain whether it is actually ...


7

Much like your car, the number of miles, or the number of prints that you can get out of it is entirely up to how well you can maintain it. A 3D Printer is a machine, and a machine needs general maintenance; if you see something starting to break - or get worn out - or anything abnormal, fix it. I am sure that if you had something like a MakerBot, it would ...


7

As with any manufacturing process, you'll need to learn to "use the right tool for the job". It depends on the requirements of the part. To answer your question, I would suggest using a larger layer height for the sheer fact of reducing print time on larger objects. However, it depends on the part and how small the details are on the part. If your part has ...


7

Sound Encoding basics Sound is a compression wave, and any depiction of it has to be an encoding of it. You can encode it so you can recreate the sound using a contraption that oscillates in the right way to compress air again in the right pattern, but you can't just "print it out" like you can scale up a lightwave from the nanometer scale to a ...


6

Here is a great answer to the underlying physics of resonance: "A object rings because it has acquired energy in a way that it resonates - it vibrates at a frequency and with enough energy to generate sound waves. As long as the object has sufficient energy, it will continue to ring. It cannot ring forever as the sound waves gradually reduce the amount of ...


6

If you keep the head hot during the pause, and over the print, you will melt the material already deposited. If you move to X0 Y0 (like on a layer change) and pause there, you can cool off the head (or not), but will want to prime (advance) some material before resuming your print - or risk an initial void, as the heated material will expand and drip to ...


6

The simple answer is: No There are two basic reasons for this: The sun will not get the filament hot enough to evaporate any moisture which has been absorbed. While sitting out in the sun, it will continue to absorb more moisture, which defeats the purpose. On Matter Hackers, they give a very reliable way to dry filament: Preheat your oven to 160-180°F (...


5

There are a lot of factors to 3D printing parts that work and fit together. A lot of it will be discovered by trial and error, but let's try to put you on the right path. First your material is what matters the most. Specifically their coefficient of thermal expansion, i.e. how much can the plastic change when heat is applied. PLA's coefficient is low ...


5

Yes. This question and most of the answers are old, and 3D printing has come a long way in the past 4 years or so. Alexandre Strube's bumping with one up-to-date answer inspired me to take another try at it, and my first attempt was an overwhelming success. Bolt printed in horizontal orientation (with support), nut vertical. Wall line width reduced from 0.4 ...


5

Regarding the sturdiness of the final print, I believe it depends on the inter-layer adhesion of the filament itself - which varies greatly. Also, normally, thicker layers would increase the strength of the print up to a certain point. An informal study of strength/layer height ratio can be found here: this study suggests that the strength of the print ...


4

It's also worth noting that the ratio of nozzle diameter to layer height affects strength. The layer height is typically set slightly smaller than the nozzle diameter, so the nozzle "squeezes" the new plastic onto the previous layer. This is especially important for the first layer, because it affects how well the object sticks to the bed; but it also ...


4

All printers are designed with an idea of WYSIWYG for sure. Depending on: printer - type/quality/settings/configuration/assembly precission filament - type/quality/shrinkage user skills - manual/using app proficiency model complexity environment conditions and so on you can get different results. I venture to say users know their printers (after some time ...


4

Thomas Sanladerer performed exactly the comparison you ask. Check the whole video. The result is that inductive sensors are the most accurate, but they are highly dependent on the bed material chosen. Mechanical switches (bare, no metallic arm) are about as accurate and keep the same accuracy with every bed material (however you need a mechanism to retract ...


4

I don't think there is a simple answer. In my opinion, for a home sensor accuracy doesn't matter. Firmware usually allows setting an offset between the indicated position and the actual position. What really matters is repeatability. Every time the sensor indicates position, the position is the same. Mechanical Switches I have found through testing ...


4

I just did. I printed a 4 screws at .2mm and 20% infill. surprisingly, all screws worked with a plastic m4 nut I had from china (not 3d printed). The project itself 1 tells to print at 100% and 0.1. When I started screwing the 4th one, I pushed the tool badly, and the screw head popped off. After reading this thread, and experiencing what I just said above ...


4

I'll take a stab here, but my gut instinct is to say that a printed part will not sound the same as your original gourd resonator. I believe the acoustics rely on the hardness, shape, and size of the material. In which case, a gourd is a hard and often thin material (after gutting it). Typical 3D printing materials will have a minimum thickness which may ...


4

Survivability of parts is a very tricky topic, because a lot of factors go into it. While ABS is a common industrial plastic for molding, FDM introduces quite different challenges that can impact the time a piece lives. I can't estimate a lifetime for you, but I will illustrate why we can't estimate it for you, giving you things to think about in your design ...


4

Not all filaments are created equal. Even with the very same manufacturer, the addition of colorful pigments can change the needed printing temperature a lot! I have had a white china PLA that was giving ok quality at 200°C, but the same brand's clear PLA only took 195°C to print. My white Kaisertech prints better at the 200°C while orange needs a little ...


4

Here is my suggestion for a cheap, well and temperature accurate drying manner of a filament. I've done it several times for PETG that is actually a very moisture absorbing filament and pops it up when using by ruining the job. Why not using your own printer's heat bed to dry the filament (PETG about 6 hours in 65 degrees of Celsius)? I can guarantee that it ...


4

I think this is just about doable. In this answer, I will assume you want to produce a "rumble strip" style of object that will reproduce a recording of human speech. I'll assume you don't care about sound quality, you just want the words to be intelligible. The main things to consider are the printer's resolution, the size of the object to be printed, and ...


3

I think that you've got the right idea in concept, but benchmarking is typically the best way to prove this out. You should get in the habit of designing with assembly in mind. This means: Hole sizes should be larger than intended and/or shafts should be smaller than intended Scaling does not always solve the issue! Avoid relying on scale tools as it can ...


3

A book you would benefit from reading is "Functional Design for 3D Printing...Designing 3D Printed things for everyday use - 2nd Edition" by Clifford Smyth. It deals with FDM printing only. It deals with considerations of orientation of the parts being printed to address required strength in the 3 directions (x, y, z), tolerances, and designing parts in ...


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