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45

Rafts: Rafts are a few layers of plastic a placed on the printing surface before the object is printed. If non water dissoluble filament is used, a bit of an air gap will be placed between the raft and the print itself so it can be removed easily. A raft can help a print stick to the printing surface as it normally has a larger surface area than the bottom ...


11

A raft will allow for better adhesion for the whole print as the raft attaches to the printing surface and the print attaches to the raft. Rafts go all the way under the print and consist of multiple layers, whereas a brim is only 1 layer and on the outside of the print. Rafts are normally harder to remove than brims because of the increased contact with the ...


10

The best way to get rid of them is to change the design of the printed object to make them unnecessary. Instead of printing the one part with support material, the piece can be split into two or more parts which can be printed without support material and assembled after the printing. Given that this is not always fully possible, a convenient way to get ...


8

A raft is used to prevent warping. Instead of printing directly on the build surface, parts are built on top of it. You remove and dispose of a raft post-print. The raft is larger than the part and so has more adhesion. Rafts are primarily used with ABS to help with bed adhesion. Rafts are also used to help stabilize models with small footprints (e.g. a pole)...


8

All three of these features are used to improve the quality and success rate of prints, especially those failing due to issues on the first few layers, or due to the small size of the first layer. Raft A raft is a horizontal feature made as the first few layers of a print, and is used to help with bed adhesion issues, primarily used with ABS. The first few ...


7

A couple things to consider: Ensure that your build plate is flat and level. An un-parallel HBP could result in the object "welding" to the raft. Turn down your nozzle temperature. It is likely that the material is hotter than it needs as it is extruding. This results in a slower "cool-down rate". So, if it takes longer for the filament to cool between the ...


6

You should reduce the air gap option called "Raft Air Gap". Printing ABS optimally requires an enclosure of the printer, wind and draft cause temperature changes which could lead to layer separation.


5

Last first: use of a raft has nothing to do with bed levelling. It depends only on the features/shape/etc of the object being printed. Now, as to what the auto-levelling does: the answer is, sadly "it depends." A simple algorithm will just find the Z-height of the four corners and apply a bilinear correction to Z as a function of {x,y} coordinates. A ...


5

Increasing the distance between the support/raft and the print should allow for easier removal. Some slicers (such as Slic3r) have settings for 0.0 mm spacing for water dissoluble supports, and 0.2 mm for regular plastic supports. Changing the upper surface of the support also can help. Some slicers will leave the support as lines all the way to contact ...


5

A raft helps when the part has few points of contact with the print bed, and doesn't therefore adhere well at points within and without the part. A brim helps when the part doesn't adhere well around the perimeter of the part. There are very rare situations where you'll need both, but typically you'll only use one or the other.


4

I use diagonal cutters and a pair of mini pliers. I print with Simplify3d and the support structures are remarkably easy to remove, I find giving a quick pull pops most off. The diagonal cutters get rid of any small beads leftover.


4

You got a few things happening. First that temp seems low. I am printing PLA at 215.. but there are a lot of factors. Start with a simple calibration thin wall test. Which is just a wall, no body. From there your bed could be closer. Maybe. I don't think that's really the issue. Slower speed and heat will make more of a difference. That said. I take a ...


4

You could experiment with the 'cleaning' part of the startup gcode shown here G1 X100 Y0 F4000 ; move half way along the front edge G1 Z1 ; move nozzle close to bed M109 S200 ; heat nozzle to 200 degC and wait until reached G4 P10000 ; wait 10 seconds for nozzle length to stabilize G1 E10 ; extrude 10 mm of filament G1 z15 F12000 E5 ; move 15 mm up, fast, ...


4

In the newest version of Cura (4.5.0), in the per model settings, the only thing you can change for options set Build Plate Adhesion is Brim Distance. What this allows you to do however is create a brim for everything with the distance of a millimeter or two, and then for the part that needs the brim, you just set the distance to zero in the individual part ...


4

Basically there are two problems to address: first - bed inclination and second - uneven bed surface. There are different algorithms dealing with one or both problems. Most specialists insist that bed should be flat and most people use glass as the top to achieve this. And this eliminates second problem and require to solve only the first one. To find bed ...


4

A probe or even manual (e.g. through LCD panel) leveling results in either a reference plane or mesh. This depends on the firmware and the options set in the firmware. Basically, this process maps the geometry of your build plate. Once it knows this geometry, printing an object results in the head following the height contours of the mapped build plate. ...


4

Your trouble lies within the presliced G-code: the temperatures are rather low for PLA and upping both by 10 degrees would be advisable: 200 °C for the Hotend 60 °C for the Bed Atop that, printing a raft for PLA is usually not advisable. Get yourself a slicer (the most common free ones I am comfortable with using are Cura, Slic3r and Slic3r Prusa Edition) ...


3

As comments suggest, a raft is not all that popular. Consider using a brim/skirt instead. I've had excellent luck with a 4-mm skirt, printing onto blue painter's tape. (Unless you consider it bad luck when I have a devil of a time getting some parts to release :-) ). Skirts are trivial to cut free from the object. In a similar vein, if you run into ...


3

It looks to me as the model did not have enough surface contact with the raft. This can be caused by to big of a gap between raft and model set in the slicer or because of Underextrusion. The part itself does not look underextruded, at least not a lot, so I would say that the slicer settings were not ideal. I would suggest you slice a part by yourself and ...


2

You could try reducing the temperature of the hotend. If you are using too high of a temperature, the ABS will "run" and over-adhere to the raft. What slicer are you using? I have found that raft quality is drastically affected by the slicer I've used. In my experience, MakerBot and Simplify3D produce the nicest, easiest to remove rafts. I've also had ...


2

After additional research, it seems that using both at the same time is ill-advised (more like pointless). Wave bonding is best suited for larger prints, primarily to prevent warping of the initial layer. Rafts appear to be recommended regardless, other than for advanced users.


2

While using rafts with PLA is a good idea due to warping, PETG is a material that requires very little build plate adhesion. When I printed with PLA, I would normally use a two layer raft with a 0.3 mm air gap. With PETG, however, I only need a skirt. I recommend calibrating your extruder height so that when you slide a piece of paper underneath, you ...


2

When I started work on mine, the bed leveling and radius (Delta-only issue) were horrid, and my erstwhile assistant was fond of using a LOT of glue stick, which sort-of made things work, though in many cases with no first layer extrusion. As I sorted things out, I found an apparent bug (Repetier Host (Mac) and Marlin 1.1.0-RC8 firmware - not sure which side ...


2

I'm not sure I am reading your post correctly, but if you are doing a batch of small prints, I would recommend to space them enough so as each of them has its own mini-raft, rather than all of them sharing the same large one. If you are using cura, you can tweak how much the raft goes past the footprint of the part. Unless you are printing very small parts,...


2

I have been able to get rafts that peel off by editing the g-code after the raft has finished and adding an M104 set temperature command telling my printer to cool the nozzle down to about 40 degrees and then another M104 command to tell the nozzle to heat back up again. This gives the raft enough time to cool and then the raft doesn't weld to the rest of ...


2

This is a "No" and "Yes" answer, it depends on the version of Cura you are using! No, there are no options available to set the brim to some of the parts in Ultimaker Cura (at the time of writing this answer, pre Cura 4.5.0). You could however change the smaller model to include the brim in your design, or add so-called "Mouse Ears&...


2

Do things in this order 1) Make sure your bed surface is appropriate. (PET tape, or elmers glue on glass. must be applied every 3 to 4 prints in used area) 2)Make sure extruder temperature is not too low or too high. Generally I'll start at the minimum recommended manufacturer's range for your specific filament + 5 degrees. Then bed temp around 55c to 60c. ...


2

The gap between the raft and the first layer is too large (you need to switch to expert mode in Ultimaker Cura to see the values of the option before you can change them) and the hotend is too hot (normal PLA generally prints at 190 °C, ESD PLA prints at higher temperatures; you could aim for 210 °C as a start), This makes it difficult to ...


2

The raft base (initial layer) is usually printed with very wide lines. Cura's default is double the nozzle diameter, so 0.8 mm with standard 0.4 mm nozzle. This is ridiculously high flow, especially with the default 0.3 mm thickness, which is why the raft base lines are (and must be, unless you have a seriously overpowered hotend) printed so slowly. So, each ...


2

It is unlikely this is a filament material issue since many of us have used Hatchbox PLA without this issue. This is a first layer adhesion issue. Your bed may not be clean, or the bed may have had an adhesion layer you cleaned off. Your nozzle may be too high on the first layer. Your bed my not be level. Glue sticks can help adhesion. Glue sticks ...


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