Hot answers tagged

9

I'm surprised your research hasn't answered your question, as the concept is relatively simple. You have most of the answer in the question. The missing item is a light source. Usually the source is an array of ultraviolet LED modules. There are resin printers that would not be called LCD printers, as they use computer display projectors to generate both the ...


9

One of the options you have would be to create a negative pressure in your working area. This would be accomplished by installing a fan with the flow direction to the outside. The inside portion of the fan should have ducting that terminates near your printer. You could place your printer in something elaborate, or in something as simple as a large cardboard ...


9

Taken in order your questions: Maintenance for a resin printer means keeping the vat or tray clean, using appropriate methods to remove the unused resin (or leaving it in the vat per manufacturer's directions). Cleaning the tray should be done also per manufacturer's spec, although each printer's user forum may provide better or more effective options. The ...


7

While you probably cannot find an MSDS on the resin for your printer (yet), they are out there for other resin based printers. Here's a generic MSDS on one for Objet RGD515: It's not a pretty thing. To back this up, Fabbaloo has two articles out which talk about the toxicity of liquid resin which is light cured. I'm not entirely positive your resin falls ...


6

First things first: Resin is very aggressive. It can very easily make you hypersensitive, even to the fumes of it. So step 1 is easy: Limit exposure Wear gloves when working with resin. As you live with your printer in the same room, bottle up the resin right after use and only open it during use to prevent buildup over time and exposure. To further reduce ...


6

Wear Gloves. Returning is impossible Resin does not just harden, it polymerizes into shape from monomers in a chemical reaction. That means to break it down, you need to destroy the whole chemistry. There is no solvent that can simply reverse it. Wiping is easy As long as the rein is still liquid, you can wipe it off. Then clean the parts with Isopropylic ...


5

Resin is notoriously hard to handle, especially as exposure to air and light can and will cure it over time. The uncured resin is a hazardous material. Handling hazardous waste The rules for safe disposal can - generally speaking - be broken down to this: make sure the hazardous material can't contaminate water or food sources make sure the hazardous ...


5

Concentrated nitric acid will remove all organics, including your skin, wire insulation, etc. It will work on a glass plate, but the fumes would eventually damage the plastics on your printer unless you remove the glass plate to clean it. Nitric acid will destroy most build surfaces that are added to glass. To a lesser extent concentrated sulfuric acid ...


4

Despite how many vendors make it appear, resin-curing SLA/DLP printers are industrial or commercial tools that are really not suitable for home desktop use. Here are the major downsides: Significantly more expensive to operate than FDM printers, in most cases. The resin is seriously toxic until fully cured. Fumes can be an issue for users handling raw ...


4

Postprocessing AFTER Curing Liquid or not fully cured Resin is a skin irritant and should not be handled without gloves. Exposure to it is to be reduced to an absolute minimum. To make sure you work with an inert chunk, you need to first wash and then cure your items before handling any postprocessing, such as sanding. Only this way you can avoid getting in ...


3

I would personally stick to isopropanol. Be aware that 3D printing is a very expensive hobby, but health wise this is a better option. Methylated spirits can quickly become dangerous, and often can burn with a close to invisible flame, meaning that you may not even see if it is burning. Also, the fumes can quickly become dangerous, whereas after years of ...


3

I own a Sparkmaker FHD whose X/Y resolution is 57µm. Z resolution (layer height) is up to the user, 25, 50 or 100µm being typical values. I have limited experience with it but the level of detail seems to be coherent with the specification. The more popular (but less powerful in therm of UV light, so slower) Anycubic printers have a 2k screen and reach a X/...


3

In general, resin printers can provide a level of detail that has to be viewed with a magnification device. The technology used in the printer will limit the resolution of the printed object. Laser based SLA printers will give the smallest resolution, while LCD panel based printers can be slightly more coarse. The specifications on the web site for that ...


3

Brushed aluminum is a common bed surface for resin based printers. The aspect of the aluminum that is important to the print is the adhesion, hence the roughness of brushed aluminum. It has to be sufficient to hold the print in place, but not so extreme as to cause destruction on removal. In the case of copper as a print surface, one would certainly want ...


3

The printer prints, then moves up, then down again. The print surface stays inside the resin vat at all times. As a result, we have this experiment: The "bottle" is resting in a vat of liquid. As we raise it more and more, it does not drain until the lower lid is free of the liquid surface or some point of the shell delaminates. The release of the ...


3

Background SLA relies on the properties of UV-curing Resin. Most currently available UV Curing Resins harden to a solid, hard polymer, but that doesn't mean there are no other UV curing resins that are elastic. Most however will not be suitable for SLA or DLP systems! Polyurethanes, which can be flexible if cured in the right way, have not come onto the ...


3

First of all, let's look at what the filaments are: PLA & PVA Filaments Normal PLA and Water-soluble PVA contain for the most part the material on the tin, its precursors, and possibly some modifiers. These are only suitable for thermoplastic processes like injection molding or FDM/FFF (Filament deposition modeling/Fused Filament Fabrication) printers - ...


3

Resin basics Resins are tricky, but probably less tricky than FDM as the manufacturing process is much less likely to include contaminants in the shape of contaminated air, particles, or adding lead into the print. This is all due to the whole process of creating the polymer happening under the protection of the resin, which in its monomeric liquid state is ...


3

Considerations for storing resin include using a light-tight bottle, preventing stray ultraviolet radiation from prematurely curing the resin. You'll also note that users will filter the resin through a fine mesh filter. I've seen some videos in which the user pours through coffee filters to remove as many particulates as possible. Left-over resin that has ...


3

I believe you've identified the primary problem with this model. The single surface features are going to interfere with printing this object. The image above is the result of loading the model into Autodesk Netfabb. The red segments are reversed normals, but also single surface components. There are others, visible when rotating the model. One portion is ...


3

First of all, Fred's answer is very well but some more items to note, and a different way to fix them using blender. After opening blender, deleting the box with entf and importing the Wavefront .obj, I changed to edit mode and started inspecting the colored areas for artifacts and what they were. Layered surface only areas The top feathers are made up from ...


3

In my experience, when I had the same issue happening it was because my first layers exposure time what too short. I was experimenting with bottom exposure time (in order to reduce the elephant foot) and sometimes, with very low exposure's time, I had failed prints that didn't even adhere to the print plate and remained stuck to the FEP (exactly as it ...


3

Short answer: Use a calibration test. Long answer: There are a bunch of calibration test files out there you can run. Ameralabs has a guide on how to read one of them and they have a link to download the STL at the bottom of the website. In short, the test file will print with a bunch of features that are hard for the printer to handle (thin posts, angles, ...


3

More is better, as less resin need to come under the build platform during the lift. But very close objects specially for delicate details may cause them bend close together by liquid resin surface tension, which will impact surface quality.


3

Turns out I was using an old (and buggy) version of the software. The version I was using came on the supplied USB memory stick and was version 1.9-something. I downloaded the latest version (2.0-something) off the Creality website and now it doesn't appear to have the same problem.


2

When using a DLP 3D printer, a projector (or other UV light source) is shining on a layer of resin. As the light source shines on a whole layer at a time, it is able to print at a rather constant linear vertical rate. This rate is normally around 2.5 cm (1 inch)/hour When comparing this to a standard FDM printer or a single laser system (such as the Pegasus ...


2

Thank you folks. The issue was bad/old resin and left in the tank too long. Replacing all my stocks with fresh and following rigorous stirring and decanting I now have resin curing well during the print. Sorry to have taken so long to get back to it.


2

It might be the case that the resin separated into layers in the tray. Try mixing the resin well in its container. I have also heard it can help to filter the resin prior to mixing.


2

Factually, the correct process is to heat up the mold hot enough to evaporate the positive. In investment casting the process to remove the wax or plastic positive is called the "Dewax" and "Burnout preheating". The answer to your question depends on the material you use to generate a negative mold of the positive product. E.g. many silicate based ...


2

You do not need to use any glue or any other adhesion modifier to increase your build plate adhesion. Take these steps instead: Make sure your build plate is level Use proper attachment layer (raft) - see 3D printing raft in resin 3D printing: what you need to know. Increase bottom layer exposure Make sure your resin is not cold (25+ °C works best) Make ...


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