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Postprocessing AFTER Curing Liquid or not fully cured Resin is a skin irritant and should not be handled without gloves. Exposure to it is to be reduced to an absolute minimum. To make sure you work with an inert chunk, you need to first wash and then cure your items before handling any postprocessing, such as sanding. Only this way you can avoid getting in ...


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Resin printing (aka stereo lithography) was actually invented before (FFF/FDM) filament extrusion printing. The term 3D printing was more or less created as a generic way to name and describe both along with a handful of other methods. It is additive because you add layers to other layers to build the part rather than carving up an original solid block. ...


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Scrap the prints You didn't cure the print, and your paint might interact with the resin in such a way that it might never cure. The paint also will prevent UV rays from accessing the resin. With this prospect, the only diligent way to go is to treat the item as potentially dangerous and discard it in the proper way. Layering paints that have not cured fully ...


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Turns out I was using an old (and buggy) version of the software. The version I was using came on the supplied USB memory stick and was version 1.9-something. I downloaded the latest version (2.0-something) off the Creality website and now it doesn't appear to have the same problem.


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Not inherently SLA prints are usually very glasslike in their internal structure and thus are often quite brittle: They tend to break with a very distinct, sharp failure mode. Their compression strength is often high but their tensile strength is limited, and their resistance to side loads is low. Due to the printing method solidifying the resin layer by ...


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In my experience, when I had the same issue happening it was because my first layers exposure time what too short. I was experimenting with bottom exposure time (in order to reduce the elephant foot) and sometimes, with very low exposure's time, I had failed prints that didn't even adhere to the print plate and remained stuck to the FEP (exactly as it ...


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More is better, as less resin need to come under the build platform during the lift. But very close objects specially for delicate details may cause them bend close together by liquid resin surface tension, which will impact surface quality.


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In the video, there is this still from 0:32: The labeling is iPro 8000, which is a 3dSystems resin printer using SLA technology.


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It seems that it doesn't matter. But it's probably a lot easier if you use a bradel (awl) to pre puncture the holes.


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You can't print a LEGOTM Brick, because you are not Lego System A/S. The best you can do is print a brick that is compatible with LEGOTM bricks. Also note that Lego Systems A/S has more than 600 US design patents, which might interfere with the legality of manufacturing bricks in the US. The original bricks are made from ABS and made with a very tight ...


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If the SLA Resin is not curing under the lamp after several hours, it is likely the lamp is not emitting the correct wavelength of UV light to properly cure your resin. Typical SLA resins cure at between 350-410 nm light. The listing you post does list the lamp as emitting 405 nm light, which would be in range. However, because of the failures you are ...


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Based on my experience, cure-time and thickness increase or decrease is not linear and it is mostly curve. For example resin rated for 50 micron 5 s cure time. You should expect: 25 micron - 3.2 s 50 micron - 5 s 100 micron - 12 s If a resin manufacturer do not provide specific cure time for thickness you want, you should always print calibration objects....


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Although you've noted that you have run the model through the slicer, what's missing is if the preview shows you more than one layer. Near the bottom of your post, I think you're indicating that more than one layer is being displayed. In the preview, you should see images indicating that the layers are changing as the slider/progress bar is moved. The first ...


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Layer height affects the exposure time. Thicker layers mean that you need to expose longer. You would need to test and verify what works for you.


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I'm an owner of both an FDM printer and a resin one: I've long searched a resin capable of printing durable objects even in tiny details but with poor luck. I've tried ABS-Like resins, and they provide a slightly better resistance than regular resin but do not expect great improvements; I've tryed the siraya tech Blue V2 that is for sure much more durable ...


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The whole reason to pre-coat the plate with liquid resin is to ensure, that no air bubbles are left under it and prevent contact of the plate to the resin. A layer of cured resin throws off your 0.


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You do not need to use any glue or any other adhesion modifier to increase your build plate adhesion. Take these steps instead: Make sure your build plate is level Use proper attachment layer (raft) - see 3D printing raft in resin 3D printing: what you need to know. Increase bottom layer exposure Make sure your resin is not cold (25+ °C works best) Make ...


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Don't hollow most miniatures below the 40 mm-scale Tabletop miniatures are quite small in scale. Often they have very thin details. As a result, hollowing them out is not advisable in the first place and you will have the best results by printing them solidly. Most wargames use something between the 16 mm to 34 mm scale, but the problem is still present at ...


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According to Uncle Jessy (see Youtube channel), you simply need to pour some liquid resin over the build plate and then leave it for a couple of minutes for the worst to drip off. No He also recommends that the resin should be kept at a warm room temperature and that the bottle be thoroughly shaken before pouring it onto the build plate or into the resin vat....


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NOPE UV-cured Resins are Duroplastics. Most of them are chemically inert to anything short of concentrated strong acids does nothing to them. Even strong acids such as sulphuric acid (battery acid) will take quite some time to work on it - if it works at all. If you have access to metal or glass etching equipment, those acids might have a chance, though that ...


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The rook is normally difficult to remove, it's designed this way. Have you tried resetting the height of you build Plate? If it makes a grinding sound when doing the first 2 or three layers your build plate might be traveling too low. Also try re-leveling your build plate, e.g. I pushed so hard when I tried to take my rook off that I un-leveled it.


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If you put the object directly on the bed, the lowest part of the object will be cured as the bottom layer. And yes, you can sand it away depending on the shape of the object. For such large objects, you can also use a feature called Double Exposure, it is available on few slicers and easier to deal with.


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Are you for real? Isopropyl alcohol is less dangerous to your health than ethanol with a touch of denaturant? Seriously read the MSDS sheets for the products and know what's in them before you say stuff. The amount of MEK or MIBK is so small. Some and not many methylated spirits have a small fraction of methanol but so little that it is safe to work with. ...


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There are ESD safe nylon filaments available, but even they will be well above their glass transition (= softening and sagging under their own weight) before they get up to 165 °C. What I'd recommend is looking for a method to resin print the parts and add your ESD protection as a post-process. Most UV cure resins are thermoset, in that they won't soften at ...


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It seems easy to calculate but it is not. Due to acceleration and deceleration, the movement time hard to predict. If you take a look at Atmel source code for movement you would get clear idea. Usually these boards contains RAMPS compatible firmware running on a separate micro controller. Any value change on this side such as movement parameters are not ...


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What seems to be a difficulty is the stabilizers for plastic absorb UV. So if added to UV resin, they probably greatly increase the exposure time needed. The following show characteristics of some plastics, taken from https://www.coleparmer.com/tech-article/uv-properties-of-plastics Unmodified types of plastics that are regarded as having unacceptable ...


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If you look at the video at 37 seconds, it appears to be SLA or DLP. Further reading: https://www.solidprint3d.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SLA_vs_DLP.pdf


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Times are not dependant on the printer but the resin. Please look at the resin's label, which should have recommended settings.


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The print you do is a sealed cup in the position it sits directly on the build plate. As a result, there is a column of resin in the cup as you print and at some point, the weakest spot delaminates, the air gets into the column and drains. Take the print and either angle it by a few degrees so the hole in the top becomes a vent or add a tiny extra vent-hole.


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I would try hexane, and then Dichloromethane and if those did not work, I would heat up sodium hydroxide to about 70-90 °C. These would work better if you print in PLA resin, it's available from a few sources now. Bucktown polymers and 3Dresyns both have a water-soluble resin. You could also print, make a soft silicone mold, cast in chocolate or isomalt and ...


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