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Yes, it is actually pretty hard to find that information. First thing is that the resin never stops curing. Additional exposure to UV will continue to degrade the material over time. This is true of even plastics (and human flesh), however, in the case of UV resins we're talking about years not weeks. Each manufacturer of resin, even from different batches, ...


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What seems to be a difficulty is the stabilizers for plastic absorb UV. So if added to UV resin, they probably greatly increase the exposure time needed. The following show characteristics of some plastics, taken from https://www.coleparmer.com/tech-article/uv-properties-of-plastics Unmodified types of plastics that are regarded as having unacceptable ...


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Sunlight contains the full spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, including the wavelength to photoinitiate your resin. Most UV-curable materials are kept in opaque containers for this reason. The extent to which your material is crosslinked will depend on your material and how much sunlight it receives.


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In the video, there is this still from 0:32: The labeling is iPro 8000, which is a 3dSystems resin printer using SLA technology.


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If you look at the video at 37 seconds, it appears to be SLA or DLP. Further reading: https://www.solidprint3d.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SLA_vs_DLP.pdf


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Times are not dependant on the printer but the resin. Please look at the resin's label, which should have recommended settings.


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The print you do is a sealed cup in the position it sits directly on the build plate. As a result, there is a column of resin in the cup as you print and at some point, the weakest spot delaminates, the air gets into the column and drains. Take the print and either angle it by a few degrees so the hole in the top becomes a vent or add a tiny extra vent-hole.


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