18

It's really more about calibration than resolution -- a poorly calibrated printer will have dimension errors that prevent mating with true LEGO bricks or other printed bricks. Also, "resolution" is an incredibly loaded term for 3d printers, because it can mean a lot of different things. But we don't need to get into that right now. There are really two big ...


15

The biggest effect I've see on resolution is due to plastic stress due to thermal gradients. The higher resolution prints build up more layers of material, and each layer has a cumulative effect on thermal stress. The upper layers pulling up more as they cool, and the lower layers curling up more strongly as the layer count is increased. To counteract ...


9

I believe the Slic3r Manual summarizes this quite nicely: A thicker layer height will provide more flow, and consequently more heat, making the extrusion adhere to the bed more. It also gives the benefit of giving more tolerance for the levelness of the bed. It is recommended to raise the first layer height to match the diameter of the nozzle, e.g. a ...


8

You need a certain minimum flow rate to achieve consistent extrusion. Flow rate is the product of print speed, extrusion width (proportional to nozzle size) and print speed. If you use a very small nozzle and very low layer height, you'd need a very high printing speed to achieve a reasonable flow rate. Therefore, it's quite possible this is not a mistake ...


8

You could experiment with slicing. For example, you might not need high resolution all over the object, but you can speed up some straight parts by using greater layer high there. See a part of Slic3r manual about such thing. It is also possible to print thicker infill every Nth layer, see Infill optimization in Slic3r. Other slicers might have those ...


7

As with any manufacturing process, you'll need to learn to "use the right tool for the job". It depends on the requirements of the part. To answer your question, I would suggest using a larger layer height for the sheer fact of reducing print time on larger objects. However, it depends on the part and how small the details are on the part. If your part has ...


6

I found one of those printer things that puts ink on dead trees and tested to print a simple SVG file. <svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" width="400px" height="800px"> <rect x="10" y="10" width="72" height="72" fill="#999999" /> <rect x="10" y="100" width="378" height="378" fill="#999999" /> </svg> As I suspected 72 ...


5

There is no direct limit on the size of a hole in XY-plane (that means: oriented so that the hole is visible from above). The movement accuracy of MK3S (and most other modern 3D printers) is about 0.01 mm. So theoretically you could move around a circle that has diameter of the (default) 0.4 mm extrusion width + 0.01 mm, and get a 0.01 mm hole in the middle ...


5

Regarding the sturdiness of the final print, I believe it depends on the inter-layer adhesion of the filament itself - which varies greatly. Also, normally, thicker layers would increase the strength of the print up to a certain point. An informal study of strength/layer height ratio can be found here: this study suggests that the strength of the print ...


4

It's also worth noting that the ratio of nozzle diameter to layer height affects strength. The layer height is typically set slightly smaller than the nozzle diameter, so the nozzle "squeezes" the new plastic onto the previous layer. This is especially important for the first layer, because it affects how well the object sticks to the bed; but it also ...


4

This is an interesting question. A good thing to note when we start talking about SLA and other jewelry grade 3d printing, that you will have to factor in the materials toxicity when we start talking about medical applications. You can also look into DLP 3d printers but they will not have as good quality. What can help you right now is these SLA printers I ...


4

Your calculations about the theoretical extruder resolution are spot on. I did a similar calculation to evaluate which extruder to use with different hot ends, I paste the results. The dark cells are the input cells, the rest is calculated. You can see that for some lines I entered directly the mm/microstep value, since I wanted not a theoretical but ...


3

The only way to know exactly what limits your model, printer, slicer, and filament operate under, is to test it. While we can provide some guidelines, actual performance varies on a complex set of inter-connected variables. Even the room temp/humidity, filament age, and even filament color, can matter at the tightest margins. You have to consider what the ...


3

That depends on the ability how fast you get filament to stick to the build plate and whether the filament is loaded in the extruder. It also matters which size of nozzle you are using. The filament diameter has no influence other than smaller filament width (e.g. 1.75 mm) requires more length to extrude with respect to thicker filament (e.g 2.85 or 3.0&...


3

In addition of Tom van der Zanden's answer, when the filament moves too slowly through the heated part of the printhead it is very likeley to clog. I have had this multiple times on my UM1+, most of the time resulting from a heated printhead with no extrusion (before or after prints). So you need to be sure to have a minimum of filament extrusion happening, ...


3

In my experience building with smaller layers also makes bridging and overhangs more pronounced and less likely to fail. The smaller layers allow gradual changes for overhangs that are more abrupt with thicker layer.


2

For FDM technologies in general with a single extruder, slicing modifications is your only options. However there will be a trade off between quality and speed. For ABS, changing to a machine with a enclosed build (such as a zortrax) chamber may help and a heated build chamber (Stratasys machine) will help the quality and reliability but not the print speed ...


2

I have notes about printing Lego bricks here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3424550 The upshot is, you want to align the wall thickness of your brick model edges to match an exact multiple of nozzle thickness of your printer. This is more important than using an STL file that exactly matches real Lego dimensions, because your slicer and printer are ...


2

I ended up buying a TronXY X3 and have had it several months. I have seen several videos on the P802 and the X3 so I believe I can answer this question fairly. Here is what the two printers look like P802 X3 Here is a comparison of the features Here are my overall impressions: Both printers are kits and have their assembly challenges The X3 is ...


2

Auto-leveling is a great effort saver and a best thing in 3D printing in the last 10 years. While you can go without it, and many people do, it reduces the number of failed prints you will have at the beginning. Properly leveled bed allows you to print without using any adhesive in it, improves you performance with ABS and other stubborn things. Don't skip ...


2

Let's look at how small we can print, shall we? Well, we have this filament, it gets pressed into the chamber, melts and then moves out a small orifice. So the first thing that limits print minimum is nozzle diameter, which correlates with the extrusion width - usually, I use a factor of 1.1 nozzles for the extrusion width. Next factor is the bed or surface ...


2

The typical low-end consumer printers that are so common now in the $100-800 range (yes, I've seen small ones sell that cheap) cannot achieve this, even with special nozzles. But your machine is a bit nicer than that. Looking online at the manufacturer's page for the machine, we find these specifications: LAYER THICKNESS 55 microns BUILD RESOLUTION 100 +/-...


1

Short answer Usually no. Long answer There are several big factors that limit how small things you can print. The bigger ones are pretty much: Positional accuracy and settings (limited by steps/mm in X, Y, Z) Nozzle diameter Now, why don't you need to care about steps/mm on the extruder that muchin the grand scale compared to the positional accuracy? Well, ...


1

Update on this: Per this article: 3D printing strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration There are a few 3d printing technologies beyond your typical FDM/SLA/Polyjet that can get this small. Melt Microextrusion two photon polymerization Something called MEW continuous liquid interface production I found various articles where someone "printed" that ...


1

This is dependent on the slicer and the nozzle diameter. Typically, you cannot print a wall smaller than twice the nozzle diameter because walls need an inner and outer line. Therefore, your slicer will make some cutoff and won't print walls below a certain threshold, in order to try to faithfully replicate your model. Slic3r, I believe, will automatically ...


1

Unless you have proven demand, you should start with aluminum tooling. It's much cheaper than steel, and (I'm assuming you want this for injection molding) you can produce quite a decent amount of parts from aluminum tooling if you handle it carefully. Why do you want your tooling to be based on a 3D print model? Typically, for greatest accuracy, the tool ...


1

SVG is a vector-graphics format, there's no particular reason it can't scale arbitrarily. Presumably the CNC software will allow you to select the scale of a pixel? If so, pick a scale that makes the math work out easily (so some integer number of pixels per millimeter). If not, it's probably documented somewhere for the specific tool you're using.


1

SketchUp is likely to not work well for you if your objective is to create a printable STL file in pieces. You would want to determine initially that the un-segmented model is manifold and 3d printer ready. Once that is determined, consider using an alternate program for your chop-up actions. You do not specify the size of the printer you intend to use, but ...


1

Use Cura middle button in bottom


1

For 3d printing this is not very relevant. The triangles only exist in the File read by the slicer. And there are file-formats that can describe rods without the need to use triangles. If you create a model in a format that uses triangles than just use enough of them to get your model described fully. (millions of very small triangles) That is probably a ...


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