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22

There is very little information about safety available, as home 3D printers are relatively new. However, plastics such as ABS have a long history in making plastic products, and a study found that at traditional manufacturing methods (such as injection molding and hot wire cutting) do not release dangerous levels of carcinogens and/or respiratory ...


20

Food safety is a property of both the process and the material. You can't stick food-safe material in a printer that has previously been used to print something food-dangerous and expect the result to be food safe. The only way to know if a given material is food-safe is to ask your supplier, but a lot depends on how you then process it. For instance, FDM ...


17

Almost all 3D printers have issues that could cause health problems. FDM/FFF printers heat plastic to a temperature that may cause it to off-gas, and these byproducts may not be healthy. SLA printers often use epoxies that may off-gas, or may be somewhat toxic prior to being cured. Powder based printers can also off-gas, in addition to the powder itself ...


16

Silicone socks are safe to use, provided your printer is safely operating and you are using the silicone socks in their operating temperature range. Your current setup is NOT SAFE! When the heater element falls out of the heater block (that should not happen in the first place, please secure it correctly) and heats up to about 800 °C this means that the ...


15

You are probably pretty safe printing PLA Regarding emissions, the following recent report, Emissions of Ultrafine Particles and Volatile Organic Compounds from Commercially Available Desktop Three-Dimensional Printers with Multiple Filaments, indicates that PLA is a pretty low emitter (1/20th of nylon) and most of what it out-gasses is Lactide which is low ...


15

What is TRP and how does it work? Thermal runaway protection is basically self-explaining; it is protection against the temperature getting out of control. Essentially, the firmware checks whether the measured output of the thermistor (What is a thermistor? A thermistor is basically a temperature sensor; it is an electrical component (more specific: a ...


13

Neither your thermistor nor your heater cartridge should ever be capable of becoming loose from your hotend, let alone the fact it's capable of reaching 800 °C before your printer even notices (This is a massive issue in itself!!!) Silicone socks are safe, unless you're printing materials with extremely high melting points, which is usually never. ...


12

I found much the same question at Does PLA outgas? An answer there pointed to a NASA outgassing database, Outgassing Data for Selecting Spacecraft Materials, and says that: ABS (unknown supplier), MakerGeeks PET and Makerbot PLA have been measured and are listed in the NASA database. Poster there recommended PLA for lower outgassing, and clear PLA ...


12

Fire is the most obvious risk - firmware can now detect some of the more obvious failure modes such as a detached thermistor, but loose or failing connections can still overheat. A smoke alarm is a fairly obvious (but not necessarily effective) protective measure. The risk from particulates in particular is probably low, but marginal health risks like this ...


11

Almost all of the FDM materials outgas even at normal atmospheric pressure, and, in fact, most plastics outgas. Further, FDM and many other printing processes do not guarantee no internal voids - meaning that putting a 3D printed object into a vacuum may result in breakage, cracking, and possible explosion hazards. For this reason I would focus only on SLA,...


11

There are a few main safety precautions you should consider. Make sure the area is well-ventilated. Acetone is flammable. A buildup of acetone gas could quickly get concentrated, meaning that a single spark could lead to disaster. Using a fan is good; angle it towards an open window. This is also to prevent exposure to acetone because of its toxicity. Be ...


10

I am going to address the air issue as it is currently unresolved. the third dimension offers a great answer for common safety issues. The short answer is that based on our limited knowledge at this point, there may be imperceptible health hazards related to FDM / FFF printers and therefore additional safety precautions are, in my opinion, necessary and not ...


9

Food Contact Substances There are regulatory agencies in most developed countries that regulate food containers. In the USA, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates Food Contact Substances (FCS) which are materials that come into contact with food during production, manufacturing, storage, packing, and use. They have many lists of FCS which are ...


9

Short answer no We use stepper drivers to limit the current, the travel speed is at capped by the amount of current supplied by the stepper drivers. This prevents the stepper motors from damaging themselves. You can set 200mm/s in the slicer, but you have no guarantee that that will be reached in real life. One thing to keep in mind though is that setting ...


9

One of the options you have would be to create a negative pressure in your working area. This would be accomplished by installing a fan with the flow direction to the outside. The inside portion of the fan should have ducting that terminates near your printer. You could place your printer in something elaborate, or in something as simple as a large cardboard ...


8

There are 3 things that might affect food safety of 3D printed objects: The filament - it's food safe only if it says so on the package (even if the plastic is not toxic you don't know about the color and other additives) The hotend - the hotend and nozzle may leak metals into the filament, you need something like a full stainless steel hothead. And finally,...


8

In the world of (cheap) printers, "MOSFET" has taken on a meaning of its own. For a long time, 3D printers have had MOSFETs on board of their motherboards to switch the heated bed. In the past two years or so, we've seen a surge of (mainly) Chinese printers where the on-board MOSFETs (or, more often, the terminal blocks) weren't rated for the high current ...


8

The "shock" is likely from noise filtering circuitry at the power supply's input. For filtering, every power supply has a small capacitor that connects the live input wire to ground (a so-called "class Y capacitor"). A small amount of current can flow through this capacitor, which can give an annoying, but otherwise harmless shock/tingle. Grounding the power ...


7

Following on from Harvey Lim's answer, to give a concrete example of a DIY filter, which uses active carbon, see ABS 3d Printer Nanoparticle and Chemical Exhaust Air Filter: ###Description Enclose your 3d printer and use this exhaust air filter along with a recirculating air filter to eliminate nanoparticles and chemical fumes. 95 to 99.5% of partilces up ...


7

Yes, fix the motors and any other loose/movable parts. Remove the bowden tube if it's there, and any other parts that are sticking out. Put the whole thing in a a bag to protect from dust, and put the bag in a box to protect it from getting beat up. Remember to calibrate it when you're ready to set it up again.


7

What would my printer do if I set very big travel speed? If a speed is set above the limits of the stepper, the stepper will stop rotating or stutters. Basically there are 2 limits, the first is the limit of the board to generate the pulses to the stepper and second, how these pulses are processed by the stepper. The speed of steppers depends on several ...


7

Many manufactures list their filaments as being food safe, but I would not treat this as "gospel truth". Apparently, the FDA considers PETG to be safe for food contact, but they are probably thinking about injection-moulded and vacuum-formed parts. Unfortunately, an initial search of the FDA's website did not yield any definitive information. Even if a ...


7

At the time of this writing (March 2019), I don't think theres any study on the health effects of nanoparticles emmitted by 3D Printers. The general consensus seems to be right now that those particles are potentially harmful, as they build up in the lungs, and therefore precautions should be taken. The reason why nobody has yet determined if and how ...


6

As others have pointed out, PLA isn't specifically not food safe, but materials that have been printed previously can contaminate the PLA. Additionally, anything 3D printed is extremely porous. Once a part is used for food, moisture and bacteria will accumulate in the pores, and can never be completely cleaned out, contaminating any food that contacts it. ...


6

Using negative pressure ventilation and a suitable organic filter will limit your exposure to toxic compounds, but won't completely remove them from your environment. Enclose your printer in as air-tight a box as you can manage, then use a fan to suck air out of the box. This negative pressure will ensure that any leaks in the box will not allow gasses to ...


6

Contrary to what the other answers suggest, the risk of fire is not that great. An acetone "explosion" is even more unlikely, since you need a ratio of 2.5%-12.8% acetone vapor to air for that: too much acetone (as would be the case inside of your smoothing vessel) and nothing happens, too little (as would be the case inside of a badly ventilated room) and ...


6

Food packaging needs to comply with regulations. One certification agency informing about these (and their service to certify for them) is TÜV Süd, another is SAI global. A summary of the GFSI can be found here. Inform yourself about the standards you wish to apply! The stack can not give legally binding answers. No The Ender 3 is not approved to produce ...


6

The heated bed port on your board has a 11A fuse. It will not work for a heated bed requiring 16A of current, no matter how good the MOSFETs might be. Note that the terminal block might also not be rated for that much current. You'd have to check, because often it is not the MOSFET itself that catches fire but the wiring or terminal blocks. Also, keep in ...


6

As mentioned, FDM 3D printed parts are flawed for food service and prep use regardless of the material, because of the small gaps between lines where bacteria can grow, and because your printer isn't used in a way to keep it from introducing contaminants into otherwise clean material. However, there are some ways around this. Single-use I'm pretty ...


6

First things first: Resin is very aggressive. It can very easily make you hypersensitive, even to the fumes of it. So step 1 is easy: Limit exposure Wear gloves when working with resin. As you live with your printer in the same room, bottle up the resin right after use and only open it during use to prevent buildup over time and exposure. To further reduce ...


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