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27

This answer explains that you can have different infill within the same part. Firstly the implementation in Ultimaker Cura is described, secondly how you can do this in Slic3r. Ultimaker Cura I've used a feature in Ultimaker Cura that can be used to alter the infill density locally. What you need to do is load your model into Cura, then load other objects (...


22

When you slice an STL of a heat tower, you need to tell the slicer that you need a different temperature at a certain level and maintain that new temperature until another change is requested. The way I usually do it is by using a post processing script in Ulltimaker Cura, but you can do it yourself quite easily by changing the G-code file manually. To get ...


15

My understanding is that this occurs when the object is not a true solid. Since an STL holds the triangulation of each face and spline, the slicing engine is not "smart" enough to determine if there is a gap in the model and therefore if it should be filled in and how. When the slicer encounters a gap, it will either treat the endpoint as the end ...


15

There are several things at play that can make a wider line nice to have: First layer adhesion Due to some filaments having serious struggle to get the first line or layer stuck to the bed, it can be an easy fix to just increase the line width, generating a bigger Adhesive Force $F_a\propto A(l,w)$, where A is the area covered by the line, and thus simply $A=...


13

Generally speaking, both settings result in the same1: The feed rate of the filament gets adjusted. Either you set a general multiplier, or you demand a wider line which does make it set a higher multiplier hidden in the software. 1 - if you don't look at any other factor that is! But... There is always a but, and this one is big: While we can work with the ...


10

In Cura (and Slic3r), you can 100% customize what the printer does before printing your actual model through custom start/end g-code. If you navigate to the Start/End-GCode tab in Cura, then select start.gcode, you can see what operations are run before each print begins. Lines prefixed with ; are comments, and does not affect the printing in any way. ...


10

I'm assuming you actually want to build Cura, rather than simply install Cura. If you instead want to install Cura, you can try sudo apt-get install cura-engine The following instructions were tested on my own Debian 8 (Jessie) distribution; they should be mostly, if not entirely, the same, for Ubuntu. Note that I did not follow the exact steps as described ...


9

Your nozzle is too far from your bed. The first layer isn't squished down sufficiently, resulting in these gaps. If your first layer looks like this, you should cancel your print and adjust the bed. Alternatively, you can adjust the initial height of the Z-axis in G-code (for instance, G0 Z-0.1 followed by G92 Z0, which should be appended to your start G-...


9

I don't particularly recommend the following, but it may be easier than 0scar's answer (which I would recommend implementing if you use Cura). Slice your object twice, once at the lower infill and once at the higher infil. Then open both gcode files in a text editor and replace all per-layer code in one file with the code from the same layers in the other ...


9

Shouldn't a 0.4 mm nozzle create a line of plastic 0.4 mm wide Not necessarily. Due to a phenomenon known as die swell extruding plastic through a 0.4 mm nozzle, the line of plastic that is created is actually slightly wider. Pressure inside the extruder compresses the plastic slightly, and it expands again as it exists the nozzle. They ...


8

SHORT ANSWER You're not supposed to do the single-wall perimeter thickness test to calibrate Simplify3D. That screws up the extrusion volume. The correct volume calibration procedure for S3D is: Measure actual average filament diameter and input that Print a 100% infill calibration cubes If the print is over-extruded (top or sides bulging), decrease ...


8

I don't think this feature was implemented at all with Cura v2.x. As the developers say on the v2.1 release, "Cura has been completely reengineered". Finding proper changelog documentation appears to be pretty hard because they have not posted any actual changelogs except the "user friendly viewable" changelogs which only list additions of new features ...


8

If you have OpenSCAD installed, this shell script will generate 100x100 pixel PNG images for each STL file in your current directory. for i in *.stl; do T=__tmp__$i b=`basename $i` echo import\(\"$i\"\)\; >$T /Applications/OpenSCAD.app/Contents/MacOS/OpenSCAD -o $b.png --imgsize=100,100 $T rm $T done Credit to 0scar for pointing out STL files ...


8

My3dmatter.com performed a series of tests with PLA, using "a universal testing machine". They conclude: Layer height influences the strength of a printed part when it becomes thin. A printed part at 0.1mm shows a max stress of only 29MPa, as opposed to 35MPa for 0.2mm (21% increase). Past 0.2mm, the max stress remains fairly constant around 36 ...


8

It's a nozzle size issue. The model contains a lot of details which is really challenging to print with a 0.4 mm nozzle. A big nozzle is just not able to print such fine details. You should switch to 0.25 mm or 0.15 mm. Just try to set a smaller nozzle in your slicer. There is a nice article on Prusa's blog showing the difference in printing ...


8

The answer to this is pretty much basic algebra: The software tackles the problem by using a set of functions that generate the infill pattern for ALL the build volume, then discard anything outside the shells. Which is determined by algebra: Basics Outline Function Assume the outline of the body is a function $O(l)$ that has a parameter $l$ for its length. ...


8

There are several factors playing together. For example orientation, printer & slicer settings and more. Reminder First of all, not all overhangs of greater than 45° need support. Many printers manage up to 60°, even 70° is not unheard of - with the right settings. Pretty much all printers manage tiny 90° overhangs. U-Bowls (open side up) Let's look at ...


7

Warping. Especially with materials like ABS, you want the plastic to cool down as gradually (and slowly) as possible, to prevent the print from warping as the cooling plastic contracts. On small layers, cooling is usually mandatory: with really small layers, you just end up with a big glob of molten plastic if the previous layer hasn't solidified enough ...


7

What you ask may be easier than you think. The slicing software is unimportant, generally speaking. Consider especially that your requirements fit the solution spot on. Take a look at this thingiverse snowman. Each of the colors is a separate model. Each of the colors is only one layer thick (0.200 mm). Each of the colors is placed with zero overlap to the ...


7

The filename is under the "Print settings" tab. Under output options, you can change the name template. You can use words like: [layer_height] to make the name dynamic. The variable you are looking for here is: [filament_preset] But the full name, with space and everything, is used. Here is a screenshot: Here is a link to fuller docs: https://github.com/...


6

Possible way to calculate the volume of material used is to multiply the filament length (calculated by CURA after slicing and displayed in lower right corner) and surface of filament tip. Volume = Filament_length * ( Filament_diameter / 2 )^2 * PI Of course do not forget to convert all values to the same order of magnitude (e.g. cm³).


6

Formally, G0 is a rapid move and G1 is a coordinated move. A G1 will cause the printhead to move in a straight line from the begin to the end position, whereas a G0 allows the printhead to move in any curve, so long as it ends up in the target position. Because of acceleration and deceleration constraints, it can sometimes be faster to move in a curve rather ...


6

It's not a bad idea, and you should try it. But only on prints with some height, because: The goal of the heated bed is to ensure adhesion for the first few layers. Without the heat on the bottom side of the layer, the layers above will pull those layers with it as they cool, causing the warp that you see. When your bed is warmer than the layers above, ...


6

An extra gap of 0.2 mm on top of your existing gap seems rather illogical as the filament is not squished at the build plate anymore. Furthermore 0.2 mm plus something you already have will soon result in a gap over 75% of your nozzle diameter (including your first layer; note that 75% is considered to be the max for good adhesion). The filament will then ...


6

It is quite common for modelling operations to result in 'non manifold geometry', meaning that some of the faces intersect or are not perfectly joined. Although there is nothing obvious in your model, you can check in blender by going into edit mode, unselect all, selecting nodes, and 'select all by attribute/non manifold' Ctl-Alt-Shift-M (if I remember ...


6

A sphere can be put together quarters easily, but those need support in the center. However, there is a slightly different cut is more economic: Cut a top and bottom "plate" off, print them separately, the lower one "upside down" Cut the remaining piece into quarters For more equal printing, maybe even cut them along the equator too and print the lower ...


6

First; find a model! To print something you require a model (usually this is in STL format, look into websites called Thingiverse and MyMiniFactory for examples). Once you have a model file, you need to make it readable for the printer firmware. If you can't find suitable model, then you need to design a model yourself (or ask someone to do it for you) or ...


6

I would have liked to answer linking to credible official sources, but I cannot add references either on direct B-spline printing. So I'm writing down my thoughts. I've familiarized myself in B-splines to understand what they are and read into the 2 references given by the OP. Basically, the printer software only allows printing of straight lines. Yes I ...


6

Slicing in General An STL is a set of triangle surfaces. A Watertight STL - for slicing purposes - has surfaces that always create closed outlines if cut parallel to the XY plane. A Slicer does exactly that: it creates plane-cuts at the indicated Z-heights, takes the plane-cut's outline(s), and decides a direction and order in which to follow the generated ...


6

Variable layer height is a setting of the slicer, not an ability of the printer itself. However, the printer must be able to print at such layer heights. Any FDM (Fused deposition modeling ) or FFF (fused filament fabrication) printer, which is the type you describe in the question, is able to print at 0.1 to 0.3 mm with at least a 0.4 mm nozzle diameter. ...


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