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6

Variable layer height is a setting of the slicer, not an ability of the printer itself. However, the printer must be able to print at such layer heights. Any FDM (Fused deposition modeling ) or FFF (fused filament fabrication) printer, which is the type you describe in the question, is able to print at 0.1 to 0.3 mm with at least a 0.4 mm nozzle diameter. ...


6

Slicing in General An STL is a set of triangle surfaces. A Watertight STL - for slicing purposes - has surfaces that always create closed outlines if cut parallel to the XY plane. A Slicer does exactly that: it creates plane-cuts at the indicated Z-heights, takes the plane-cut's outline(s), and decides a direction and order in which to follow the generated ...


5

It's common for modeling software to flip normals, causing what you describe. You said, I only care about the externally facing faces. But are you sure they are truly externally facing? Turn on normals in Blender and ensure that all the arrows/pointers are external. Another problem that can generate the results you're seeing are self-intersecting surfaces, ...


4

Rhino gives the following output for MeshRepair Mesh has 3 degenerate faces. (a face that's actually a line or a point) Mesh has 42 non manifold edges. (a line where 3 or more faces meet, possibly caused by degenerate faces) Mesh has 6 duplicate faces. (faces that share the same coordinates) Mesh has 148 naked edges (edges that have only one face) All of ...


4

There are several problems at work here: Internal Geometry & unjoined parts Missing Surfaces Generally inverted surfaces: every surface is inside out! Fixing it! Step 1: add missing surfaces. Select the vertices around the hole that has no bottom surface and then pres F to create a surface. Use several steps, making roughly triangle surfaces. For ...


4

Provided that the print hasn't come loose from the bed and you know the layer height or layer number, you can edit the original G-code file. The following hints should be taken into account: Don't use G28 or G29 instead use G28 X Y (please ) Manually position the printhead at the correct Z height and instruct the printer to use that height for reference: e....


4

Most slicers have a feature in their cooling settings to "slow down if layer print time is below xxx". Setting this to a higher value should ensure that small / short layers aren't printed too fast, so that cooling is still reliable. Shorter layers are slowed down linearly to reach the specified minimum time - unless a "minimum print speed&...


3

Cura is exceptionally bad at printing details comparable in size to the configured line width. Lower your wall line width to something like half the wall thickness (i.e. 0.225 mm) and see if that works. With a standard 0.4 mm nozzle I've had success printing tiny details with 0.2 mm line width or smaller. For example: And here's your model printed at 0.225 ...


3

From what I have researched, each brand of printer has their own method of slicing objects for their printer to parse. For example: Peopoly Uses a profile for Cura Creality, Elegoo and Phrozen use CHITUBOX Anycubic uses their Photon Workshop There doesn't appear to be any golden ticket type of method (like G-Code) for slicing and providing instructions.


3

The STL format does not define unit information. So there is no way of knowing, from a STL file alone, what size it should be. However there are only a handful of units people design with. So the unit is most likely one of inches, cm or mm. So if you inverse convert between those combinations you'll likely find the real size. Your image is somewhat ...


3

Okay, so like suggested I put it into 3D Builder (A free Windows 3D modeling program). I imported it as an stl, then exported it as an stl and imported that stl into Cura. And lo and behold all problems were gone! If you are having a similar issue give that a try! The 3D Builder program and similar ones are designed to export for the sole purpose of 3D ...


2

One can import an OBJ file into free program Meshmixer, then export it to STL format. There are other programs that are free and paid (such as Fusion 360) that will perform similar tasks. As noted by user agarza, Prusa Slicer will import an OBJ and will also export to STL format. PrusaSlicer is also free.


2

Basically all slicers work very similarly, it is a matter of preference, being accustomed, or wanting to use a certain (set of) features. Their job is to prepare the object to be sliced in layers to be executed by the printer you use. For every slicer to work properly, you need to configure the printer settings correctly. Basically, all slicers have the ...


2

With so many questions, I'll provide a suggestion for your first one, the alignment option. There's a 12 minute YouTube video showing how to use Meshmixer (free, multi-platform) to create alignment pins and holes while segmenting a model for printing large items. The process involves making the cut, keeping both sections. A pin is created and sized, then ...


2

It's likely that you're hitting Cura's Maximum Retraction Count (retraction_count_max) within the Minimum Extrusion Distance Window (retraction_extrusion_window). This is a misfeature supposedly designed to avoid grinding/flattening the filament, but of course acting on it will ruin your print in exactly the same way you're seeing. I think setting the window ...


2

I have recently looked into "print outer walls first" in an attempt to make the seam vanish. But turning that setting on creates a webby structure on the following area for my printer. Turning the setting off again (and reducing the outer wall speed to 30 mm/s) completely eliminated the ringing again.


2

Contrary to the other answer, this is not (exclusively) a model / geometry issue. Frame challenge: There's no good / easy solution to this when using Cura, at least that I know of. Better slicers can easily handle this situation though. I replicated all the tests in SuperSlicer, which is a PrusaSlicer branch. All tests were done with models with relatively ...


2

Fixing the model My solution to this problem is, to increase the thickness in such corners by 0.05 mm by pushing the inner wall's radius towards its center. This allows some extra space as a round corner is not actually saved round but as a pattern of straight wall facets, and those can get squished together just enough to make the slicer believe the wall is ...


1

Lowering speed on outer perimeter has always been mostly wrong, but possibly useful. Usually, it's a poor approximation for what you really want to do, which is lowering acceleration on the outer perimeter, to avoid surface quality and dimensional accuracy errors due to ringing and backlash. However, on bowden printers without compensation for pressure (&...


1

Carving decorative patterns? If your templates needs to be used like one does a stencil, that's doable... but paper-thin is not as you can't make that with an FDM printer. But if you allow 0.2 or even better, 0.5 mm thickness, it is as simple as making a vector graphic, importing it into a suitable CAD package, then extruding it to the relevant thickness, ...


1

Belt printers use existing 3d printer hardware, including controllers and steppers. The Z axis is tilted at 45 degrees (usually). So to answer the first part of your question: yes, you can use G-Code to control the printer, just as you would with an upright printer. I don't know a good resource that describes everything, but I will try my best here: it's not ...


1

Photo interpretation: I understand that the image on the right presents the actual error: it happens on many layers, following the red "Starting Point" line (so above it on the photo). Interesting issue. Btw. which side of the print is the bottom (zero layer)? - I believe the left side, and the right side is the top of the print. The problem seems ...


1

Traditional paper printing has the model where a document is sent through a driver to convert into instructions in a generic control language, such as PCL, PostScript/PS, XPS, or UFR. The resulting commands are spooled (queued as a group) by the computer to the printer, which then renders it to paper. 3D printing uses a similar process: a model is sent ...


1

FDM Slicers are not proprietoryexceptions apply Most commonly uses Slicers are generally not locked to manufacturers or models. Creality's slicer is a variant of Cura, Prusa Slicer is a (further developed) variant of Slic3r. You can slice models for almost any G-code reading 3D Printer with any of the 4. The question at the first startup or installation is ...


1

As a software developer and 3D printing enthousiast I can tell you that indeed, like Trish said, the limit is your memory (RAM) and loading/slicing time depends on the cpu power. RAM: keep an eye on the memory usage in the task manager/performance/memory tab. When it reaches the top of the graph, the application will suddenly crash and disappear. CPU: The ...


1

Cura has several settings that can cause it to erroneously omit small top/bottom surface "skins". Look for preshrink ("Skin Removal Width"), expansion ("Skin Expand Distance"), and particularly the limits on when expansion takes place ("Maximum Skin Angle/Minimum Skin Width for Expansion"). Normally Cura shrinks then ...


1

If you set it to Not in Skin it will not comb and as such it will retract. Retraction travel moves are shown as light blue lines Light blue are retraction moves. Dark blue are non-retracting moves. Both types are non-extruding moves. In that respect you would expect that if you set Combing to Not in Skin, it will retract and move to the other position: ...


1

Only proper solution that's worked for me on the .stl level like this is manually deleting and patching the triangles in FreeCAD's Mesh Design. It's usually time consuming, but there are 3d scans and the like that just cannot be modified correctly without fixing the mesh (either before or after the mod).


1

SketchUp has a problem with generating the normals of an STL in the right way. As you see in the slicer, the model claims, that the "tops" are overhangs, which means that the whole model is "inside out" with the normals. To fix that, you'd need to open the file in a program that can fix that by recalculating the normals. I suggest blender:...


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