Hot answers tagged

5

The print speed for powderbed printing depends primarily on the height of the print; the lateral extent doesn't really matter. Since powderbed printing provides its own easily-removed support structure, a packing that maximizes the number of items and minimizes the height will maximize throughput.


5

Yes, this is very popular. Look into the site Shapeways and you will see that this is exactly what they do. I've also personally seen a local 3D print shop do this with their machine. It's called batching. I similar technique can be used in traditional machine shops (mills/lathes).


4

Consumer Market? While there are no "consumer level" SLS printers on the market currently, the question in itself is very interesting on a scientific level. The pricing edges for the consumer market for 3D printers can be somewhat estimated from the consumer electronics segment. This puts a maximum price tag of about 2000-2500 \$ onto it, ...


3

Scan spacing Within each of the ‘islands’, simple alternating scan vectors are used with the spacing between these vectors defined as the ‘scan spacing’ and the speed with which the laser spot moves across the surface defined as the ‘scan speed’. Source The influence of the laser scan strategy on grain structure and cracking behaviour in SLM powder-bed ...


3

It's difficult to tell from your photo the level of detail required. A scale reference in the form of a metric ruler would be valuable. If, for example, the metallic eye on the gunner is 2 mm diameter, that would be 40 layers of 50 micron grains, allowing for substantial detail. Consumer level SLS printers, such as the Sinterit Kit, use fifty micron nylon ...


3

No The problem is twofold. Resonance and Granular convection Resonance Let's start with an empty box. We toss in some powder to create the first layer and use an ultrasonic to create a first layer. What happens? The bed starts to resonate depending on the sound you send into it in patterns - and the powder starts to form valleys and ridges along them as one ...


3

By just changing powder: No. Changing the powder, the laser and the chamber, maybe you can get something, but it's not recommended. DMLS machines use a sealed chamber with a flow of Argon, Nitrogen, or other gas to prevent oxidation of metal powder (and avoid fire or explosions). Laser power for metal needs to be of higher power than that used por polymer ...


3

Is this doable? It has been done, therefore it is doable. I agree with fred_dot_u that OpenSCAD is a good system for programmatically generating highly repetitive 3d procedural content like this space truss 3d structure. p.s.: A few links to people 3D printing various space trusses: Parametric Space Truss Platform smoothed2 octet truss flats Micro Truss ...


3

For designing your part, especially considering the repetitive mathematics involved, I would consider to learn to use OpenSCAD. I've learned the program and it fits your modeling requirement quite well. I feel it's easy to learn and is somewhat easier for folks who have a programming background. I don't have one, but it's still a logical progression to learn ...


2

In short, I don't think printing the full tetrahedral honeycomb design is a good approach considering the application of the part. Here are few things to note when attempting to 3D print the tetrahedral honeycomb: I wouldn't recommend trying to 3D print this with a an FDM/FFF printer as you will most likely need supports and there would not be enough ...


2

I currently use the 60/40 recycling mix ratio and find that it works very well. I do however wonder if there is an even more effective ratio in order to recycle used powder. I currently discard all "cake" powder (powder remaining in the build piston) and am only "recycling" the push off powder. I found this paper but it's unclear if they are reusing just ...


2

First of all, let's start with the basics: Iron oxide aka rust The University of Illinois hosts a "Ask the Van", where the question "is rust magnetic" has been asked, and I will quote from Tom J. and Mike W.: There are several different oxides of iron, with different fractions of oxygen. They are Fe0, Fe2O3, and Fe3O4. Rust consists ...


2

The Z-corp/3D systems printers lay down what is essentially ink in each layer (only around the perimeters) much like an inkjet printer, dying the powder as the parts are made. This means they can make almost any color at any point in the model. The down size is these models are pretty fragile, at least the last ones that I have handled. This can be helped by ...


1

Totally agreed with the answer provided.To add to that answer, the use of DMLS lies on the thickness and material limitations of SLS method. So, regarding the amount of thickness, the original source of sizing for both the methods vary drastically and hence cannot be inter-converted.


1

How about using a dual nozzle FDM printer with ABS and HIPS? You can use HIPS to print any support materials or any spacers that you need. The HIPS can then be dissolved using Limonene. Limonene will not do much of anything to ABS. Similar ball bearings have been printed like this before. I am not aware of any reason this would not work for you. Other ...


1

Two aspects of your question can immediately be addressed, one with much less certainty than the other. If you were to print the indicated parts using PLA on an FDM printer and assembled as much as possible up to say, the outer bearing ring, you might be able to use boiling water to soften the ring with boiling water enough to get it around the balls. It's ...


1

You'll find generally that mixing 40% new polyamide with 60% recycled polyamide will result in a reasonable finish and part. You will obviously want to use all new for parts requiring the best possible finish and mechanical properties, but this mixture will be very difficult to tell apart from a fully new mixture part: http://www.paramountind.com/pdfs/...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible