9

This is an ugly question, and an ugly answer. Nail polish doesn't come with an ingredient list. Nor are there MSDS's available to refer to what solvents are in it. So it's "unknown 1" Most every filament company will not give you a list of compounds for colorants or plasticizers used. MSDS is off the table. So, even though we do know what PLA and ABS is ...


7

First layer rippling is usually caused by a too low of a first layer height (for the amount of extruded filament). Are you sure that: Your bed is leveled as good as possible, and the initial height between the nozzle and the bed is correct when Z=0 (A4 paper thickness, when moved should be giving some drag), and the bed is flat. (This is most probably your ...


6

There are generally 2 types of operation you might want to do before priming your object: smoothing to a point that you are comfy with and roughing pass with very fine grit to give the primer something to stick to Smoothing via Sanding & Filler To smooth your object you generally have two options: Only sand down (and possibly vapor-smooth) and ...


5

ABS filaments will smooth well with using acetone, it's been used for a while now. For PLA filaments it's a different story, pure PLA will not smooth out in acetone and it will likely only cause structural failure of the product. However most PLA filaments aren't pure PLA, they contain additives including ABS that react differently when exposed to acetone ...


5

Make sure that your acetone is actually acetone. According to the MSDS, ABSPlus-P430 is indeed "ABS resin" so acetone smoothing should work. Some companies sell confusingly-labeled products that might be mistaken for acetone, but are actually "eco-friendly" alternatives such as 2-butoxyethanol. While these alternatives work for some of the uses for which ...


4

Nail polish will not damage your PLA model. 1) Let's talk about "gel" nail polish. Gel polish self-levels, does not drip, is cheap, is much more health-friendly than many finishing methods, and only takes 30 seconds under a suitable strength UV/LED lamp to dry, providing a thick smooth coat (clear, color, glitter!, anything) that makes any layer lines ...


4

The main problem is solved (first layer thickness vs leveled nozzle height). The following image shows the problem. I was running with a default 0.3 mm first layer (the tooltip setting says a slightly thicker layer helps with adhesion). The build plate was correctly leveled with "midrange" friction on the leveling card at the leveling points. ...


4

A technique I've used in the past is to make a acetone slurry of the same filament used to print your object, and carefully paint the details you need to smooth. You must be careful and only do a very thin coat or you may damage your print. You can add extra coat if needed to make sure the acetone has evaporatored from the previous coat of ABS filaments ...


4

First I would hedge your expectations.. I am very familiar with t-glase. It is very translucent but it is not clear and no amount of post treatment will make it 100% clear. Their example is the only exception where you have a simple print where it has only a single layer. By applying the clear coating they have normalized the wall and made the surface even. ...


4

ASA is Acrylonitrile styrene acrylate. According to Wikipedia: ASA can be solvent-welded, using e.g. cyclohexane, 1,2-dichloroethane, methylene chloride, or 2-butanone. Such solvents can also join ASA with ABS and SAN. Solutions of ASA in these solvents can also be used as adhesives. Staff, PDL (1997). Handbook of Plastics Joining: A Practical Guide. ...


4

From the printer... Non-post-processed surface smoothness of a print is mainly a function of the Layer height during print: it is smoother if one reduces the height of the steps taken between the layers. A very good FDM machine can achieve down to 0.05 mm layer height, but 0.1 mm is what most hobbyist machines can achieve if well dialed in. SLA printers cure ...


3

From Simplify3D - ASA: ASA can be smoothed using controlled exposure to acetone vapors (a process called “vapor smoothing”).


3

Refraction of light is caused by changes in medium or angle of inflection. Any changes in medium will cause refraction, as such to be the most clear you would not want pockets of air. This means that if you are printing single layer 0% would work. The best appearance would most likely come from 100% infill as there would be no changes in the medium. The ...


2

I would not expect a problem. The greatest problem I would expect would be if the PLA layers were not well bonded, and the coating material could work in between layers. If so, over time the difference in water absorption or thermal expansion could further separate the layers.


2

You are never going to get perfectly transparent prints, even if you were using real glass. Because of the way FDM prints, you would have fissures where the layers bond to each other. You can get good results if you use 0 or 100% infill and sand, then smooth the outside shell. If you are expecting optical quality, look somewhere else. However, I have ...


2

I'd say the clue is the material itself and the geometry of the object. But in terms of Slic3r settings you could experiment with: (print settings >> support material) pattern spacing (he has here something around 5mm) pattern (I'd say the best for you is rectlinear) contact z distance (choose 0.2 or close to that) interface layers (here 0 (zero) for sure) ...


2

Get a rock/jewelry tumbler and some tumbling media such as stainless steel shot, and try tumbling your print. For 3D printed plastic, your print will (a) need to be sturdy, and (b) not have any fine details or small parts that you don't want to be worn away. With metal you will tumble it for hours in order to smooth and semi-polish the surface. With plastic,...


2

Abrasive blasting is the only other method I can think of which you haven't said you don't want to try. It is certainly the easiest method provided you have access to one. Different forms of abrasive blasting include: shot blasting (metal shot) - I suspect it would be far to abrasive but I've never tried it. sandblasting - you have to be careful but this ...


1

The use of smoothers totally depends on the stepper drivers you are using! Note that the TL and MKS smoothers do exactly the same thing. Both use an arrangement of 4 or 8 diodes. Details of the problems with drivers and the working of the smoothers is explained in this blog post. The problem is that some stepper drivers are not able to produce low currents ...


1

The first that I have in mind was connected with an acceleration, so you could play with it (set to half the current value and see the results) The other source of that could be drive belt that is fiddling a little bit on the motor and idler shaft (visual check for any play on the motor/shaft) Next one could be connected with some obstructions in the ...


1

NO if you want to smooth your print, gently heat the plastic and with a utensil smooth out the plastic. A hair dryer is a good way of doing this but be careful to only lightly melt the outside of the model.


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