16

No, PLA cannot be used in cars standing in the sun. Temperatures can locally get over 50 °C (122 °F). I have printed sun visor hinge pins from PLA for a car (not exposed to direct sunlight either), but after one day in the sun (it usually doesn't get over 29 °C or about 85 ˚F here too) the pin deformed (only printed it for ...


8

If you put PLA parts in a sealed plastic bag (or two to keep it dry) and simmer in water (212 °F or 100 °C), the part "anneals". The time taken varies with the part shape, but for small parts should be about 15-30 minutes. You can simmer longer if unsure, but it provides no additional benefit once the part is annealed. When you remove ...


7

Design a different connection to the shaft, however I don't know of any Use a shaft/flange coupler to be fastened to your shaft and to your printed part. Without knowing the length of the shaft, you could connect a flange/coupler to design this into your gear. This is a good solution if you have to transmit larger torques. See e.g. this pulley that ...


5

The sun will rot most, if not all plastics, with PLA, ABS and PETG rotting to varying degrees and at differing rates. So, if even part of your enclosure, such as the edges, are visible, they will invariably be exposed to the sun at some point (although maybe not sufficiently enough) which will make them brittle. However, as you say, your main concern here ...


4

You could cut a v-notch groove in a piece of plywood to hold one side of the groovemount neck, and then use a bolt through another piece of wood to push the neck into the V-notch. There are lots of options when building RepStraps and JunkStraps. Really depends on what sort of hardware and fabrication capabilities you have on hand.


4

Tough set of requirements and definately pushing into the professional domain. I would recommend checking out ULTEM 1010 Resin which is similar to PEEK but has a higher glass transition temp of 215 °C. Check out the spec sheet from Stratsys. I hope this helps. :-)


4

When you get upwards facing things failing it can be because the slicer has too few top layers which makes angled faces have gaps. While you may think it is a wall the slicer sees it as top layer. Try increasing the number of top layers and check in the preview how it appears. Infill will normally support those faces so no separate support is needed. Just ...


3

If you're thinking of changing materials, you're looking at the wrong parameters. PLA has a higher hardness than either PETG or ABS, but hardness isn't what you want. The problem you're experiencing is creep, where a material flows in response to pressure. Of the common printing plastics, PLA is by far the most susceptible to creep. Either ABS or PETG ...


3

A good option would be to use a (set-)screw to press against the flat of the motor shaft, similar to how pulleys are mounted on stepper motors.


3

PEEK, a plastic known for its superior chemical and physical resilience (http://www.zeusinc.com/materials/peek/chemical-resistance-chart-peek), has been successfully used for filament-based printing (https://3dprint.com/52713/indmatec-peek-fdm-printing-filament/). However, it is unlikely to be an option on most existing printers given its high melting ...


3

Really the only thing that would matter for this project is the amount of torque the motor has available and subsequently how heavy your setup is that is connected to the motor. A part that size may just be too heavy for a CD-ROM motor if you intend on adding more parts. However, to answer your question, ABS should be able to endure the stress. I recommend ...


2

If you do not have the tools to fabricate this component yourself, but have a 3D model available, I would suggest getting someone else to 3D print it for you. There are multiple options for getting your model printed, such as: Friends Your local makerspace, library or similar 3D Hubs MakeXYZ Shapeways Sculpteo and so on.. Good luck!


2

As @r-ahlskog pointed out, it was due to the top layers count being too low. Adding some, now it looks perfect:


1

You don't get a more accurate Z height when you heat the printer and let it settle. You get a different value that will work perfectly. E.g. I've got printers that do bed leveling cold but print with the correct initial Z height to get a perfect first layer. This is also valid for manually trammed beds. The only settling you might need if for thick glass ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible