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13

The stepper motor itself does not. You may want to inspect the motors for debris or dust. Depending on your configuration you may want to check on parts of your printer that connect to your stepper motor such as shaft couplings, pulleys, lead screws/threaded rods and belts. The stepper motor wires should occasionally be inspected for wear and strain.


12

Servos do have several advantages; but, they are more expensive and more difficult to control. Generally, a servo motor is a DC motor but with an encoder to provide position feedback. A circuit (can be a computer) then compares the actual position (from the encoder) against the commanded position and uses the error to determine how much power to put to the ...


12

The four main motor speed limits in a 3d printer are: Firmware step generation frequency limits Firmware motion planner effects Loss of torque and precision due to motor coil inductance and back-EMF effects Mid-band resonance Step generation rate limits will depend on the firmware and controller board used. There is a significant range, particularly when ...


10

No, stepper motors do not require maintenance. They are a brushless kind of motor, so they do not have brushes that need to be replaced.


9

Stepper motors contain two distinct sets of coils. The current in these coils is governed by your stepper motor driver. To move the motor in either direction, the coils are being driven one after another, and in different directions. Imagine this being a normal 3-phase AC motor, but instead of three phases, only two are used. A "full steps" (1/1 "...


7

Your controller board probably requires calibration. It sounds like, maybe, the extruder's stepper motor is not receiving sufficient current, to make it turn. Or, somewhat confusingly, maybe the stepper is receiving too much current, and overheating. You don't say which controller board you are using, but regardless, there should be an adjustable ...


7

Focussing on the questions at hand: Is it possible to use full steps? This depends on your printer board. Many boards use dip switches to select the (micro) stepping mode of the stepper driver. E.g. a RUMBA board has dip switches located underneath the stepper driver boards (e.g. DRV8825 or A4988). Sometimes you also see jumper caps. The answer is both ...


6

You will likely not see a noticeable improvement by upgrading from a 16x or 32x to a 64x or 128x microstepping driver. Depending on the motors you're driving and the size of the load you could actually see a decrease in quality. Although microstepping increases theoretical resolution it does not necessarily increase accuracy. The reason is that ...


5

There are very many combinations that will work. A bipolar stepper has 2 coils. Swapping the coils, or reversing the polarity of a coil, will simply cause the stepper to rotate in the opposite direction. On RAMPS, one coil should connect to 1A and 1B, whereas the other coil should connect to 2A and 2B. On the stepper, one coil is A+ and A-, the other coil ...


5

The simple way to do this is to use a self-locking screw pitch. Pretty much any single-start thread using a sliding nut cannot be back-driven so the load will not fall. Normal 8x8 trapezoidal thread screws will easily back-drive because of the steep pitch. Likewise, a worm drive between the motor and Z stage will hold the load. You would want to switch ...


5

Ultimately, your stepper motor is unsuccessful in driving the filament through the extruder. A couple potential reasons: extruder temperature isn't high enough. This could either be operator error from not setting the temperature correctly or your machine is getting a false reading. Typically, for ABS/PLA, you can get away with a low extruding temperature ...


5

The question is if robots classification terminology the textbook sketches applies to 3D printing? Servos (closed loop) are used in robots to guarantee position (you don't want to accumulate an error after repetitive movement), most 3D printers use open loop steppers that are instructed on a point to point basis through G-code instructions, implying that ...


5

Many of the motors that look like stepper motors in laser printers are actually three-phase brush-less DC motors. These look like stepper motors, but are intended to be used differently, controlled differently, and serve a different function. Like stepper motors, they have a permanent magnet rotor surrounded by coils of wire. They typically are used in ...


4

Prints benefit from higher microstepping in two ways: Noise level Using microstepping reduces noise from your printer's operation. Print quality Using higher resolution microstepping does not increase the physical accuracy of your prints meaningfully, but it can reduce surface artifacts such as moire.


4

I also faced similar problem. Mine was a self-made marlin/repetier. The problem was that the motor current was much less than the motor requirement and the axis were not calibrated properly. Giving recommended current according to your motor ratings and limiting your feedrate according to your calibration should work.


4

Usually if they get too hot you have to adjust the amperage by turning the little potentiometer on the A4988 (turn left until you can move the motor by hand, turn right until you cant, add a little bit like 1/8 to 1/4 of a turn). But this: I used a different stepstick RAMPS card and Mega, they worked perfectly. it is not completely clear, so: the A4988 ...


4

There is a downside. If the current is too high, you lose the linearity of micro-stepping. If the highest current exceeds the maximum, then the highest current micro-stepping positions will collapse on each other. If you are within the specs of the motors, there are no motor-related problems caused by higher currents. But other problems can be caused by ...


4

That is not possible without changing to a different printer main board. The Anet A8 board has 4 integrated (A4988) stepper drivers, one for X, one for Y, one for Z and one for E (extruder 0). Both Z steppers are controlled by a single stepper driver (they are wired in parallel to the single Z stepper driver), there is nothing to free up nor is there to ...


4

Closed loop steppers like S42B are becoming popular for the spatial axes because compensating for skipped steps is the correct way to recover for those axes. For example, if the nozzle knocks into a warped corner of a print and skips, the right thing to do is compensate, commanding additional steps necessary to get to the commanded location. This is less ...


3

Nema 17 is about the physical size of the motor, ie screw hole placement. It doesn't specify anything about the power of the motor. If you are looking to replace the motor, you need quite a bit more info than that it is Nema 17, such as the steps/rotation and the holding torque.


3

The Anet A8 stepper motor 4 lead cable need to be correct in colour arrangement: mother board end: black-green-blue-red and extrauder stepper motor end: black-red-green-blue. I bought DIY RepRap Anet A8 3d printer which came with one of the red lead end not attached, so in order to complete the build I used another lead from the Kossel delta 3D printer ...


3

Check the continuity of the wires on the cable. Sometimes, they are not crimped correctly. Another common fault is crossed wires. In either case, the easiest diagnostic test is to substitute another cable, but please note the color coding of this replacement wire to match the cable you replace.


3

If the motors are in parallel, then setting it at 0.4V means each motor will only get a quarter of the current a single motor would get at 0.8V. If you set it to 0.8V each motor will get half. I think 0.8V (same as for the other motors) would be an appropriate setting. Stepper drivers are constant-current, not constant-voltage. Are the steps/mm for your Z-...


3

Awful answer, I know, but it depends... on where you are going to employ them: are they are all, or just some, of the axes, or; just for the extruder? If they are for use in translating movement of the axes, then the weights of: the y-axis plate; the x-axis carriage, and; the print head, will all come into play - amongst many other things. With a torque ...


3

I would check the gcode you're generating to make sure it's not full of "bad" z-commands. Further, I'd take any gcode file you have and manually edit it, leaving in all the initializations, heatings, zeroing, etc., and then delete everything except some z-motion commands. Run that as a test case to see what happens. I think it's extremely ...


3

Carl Witthoft, I think you are on to something with rogue commands limiting the Z-Axis. Thank you for pressing me to try a new program. Now I need to learn it... So, it works now. The only difference is that I am printing from Repitier using Cora instead of using Slicer to make g-code for an SD card. While, I am happy with the results, I am dissapointed ...


3

This is a NEMA 17 motor. It is virtually identical to the NEMA 17 motors Creality uses in most of their 12V products. In contrast to other companies, Creality uses a different connector with a flat ribbon cable instead of color-coded wires. The upper line of the label identifies it more clearly: JD Identifies the factory/manufacturer 42 identifies the ...


3

That depends on how much noise you have on your motor power supply ground. You definitely want the 100 µF capacitor to have a good high frequency response. Motors turning on and off can be noisy, and that noise can cause false clock signals in your logic circuitry if you tie the grounds together.


3

(This is more of an electronics.stackexchange.com question btw). It is not only ok, it is absolutely necessary. The systems won't operate correctly unless all the gnds are tied together. Since this is a stepper motor, you don't have to worry about noise getting back onto the power supply lines for the logic supply, since the stepper board has a decoupling ...


3

The coils in the stepper act like speakers. Its not that the stepper is making less noise, it's just making it in frequencies that are above the average person's hearing.


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