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8

If you have OpenSCAD installed, this shell script will generate 100x100 pixel PNG images for each STL file in your current directory. for i in *.stl; do T=__tmp__$i b=`basename $i` echo import\(\"$i\"\)\; >$T /Applications/OpenSCAD.app/Contents/MacOS/OpenSCAD -o $b.png --imgsize=100,100 $T rm $T done Credit to 0scar for pointing out STL files ...


6

When you want to change an STL file in FreeCAD then this is how I do it. I open the STL file in FreeCAD and select the option in the Part/Component sub-menu: Make a form from mesh (hope that I translated it well. I use the Dutch version). It can take quite some time but when it is finished you have an editable object. Just remove the STL object and do what ...


6

STL is the de facto standard in consumer-grade 3D printing. It is a bare-bone format that describes the shape of the object by defining the coordinates of all the vertices of all triangles that a surface may be subdivided into. This means that in STL any curved surface is represented with an approximation of many very small faces. OBJ is also somewhat ...


5

The correct/good method to achieve this is called "rigging", but it is not an easy feat (as pointed out by others), as it requires plenty of knowledge about the software being used to edit the model, and a good understanding of the theory behind it. Skeletal animation requires the designer to set up a skeleton (also called "rig", hence the slang term "...


5

a good way to convert a 3D print file like STL to STEP a useable file format for plastic injection molding companies I don't know much about plastic injection molding companies, but I do manipulate a lot STEP, STL files and I do know that it is possible to achieve "a good way to convert […] STL to STEP file format […]". For the record, the manufacturing ...


5

I found that the answer provided by @Marco was helpful but not the correct answer I was looking for. Here is the general approach I used (Based on this). Create new document Import STL file Switch to Part workbench Select imported mesh Part -> Create Shape from Mesh (use default tolerance) Delete imported mesh Select shape Part -> Refine Shape Delete "...


5

I don't know that this can be definitively answered for a specific printer and all arbitrary designs. The refinement level basically determines how smooth a curved surface will turn out. The STL file format can only express an object in terms of triangular-shaped surfaces, so Fusion 360 will need to approximate a curved surface by breaking it up into ...


5

An STL file is a surface model file. From Wikipedia you can read that: STL files describe only the surface geometry of a three-dimensional object without any representation of color, texture or other common CAD model attributes. This implies that there is no such thing as a wall thickness, as such you will not be able to determine the wall thickness (...


5

The operation you want is almost just cat'ing the files together. However you need to remove the 80 byte header from all but the first, and add up the 32-bit triangle count from each file immediately after that. Output should be: Copy of first 80 bytes of file 1 Sum of int32 from offset 80 of each file. Bytes 84-end from each file. See https://en.m....


5

Using the preview feature as you have is a good method to determine that the original model is flawed. It's not unusual to discover detailed models have reversed normals or non-contiguous surfaces, which will not print. In a simple example, consider a cube for which five of the six faces are properly described by the design software. This would result in ...


5

It's common for modeling software to flip normals, causing what you describe. You said, I only care about the externally facing faces. But are you sure they are truly externally facing? Turn on normals in Blender and ensure that all the arrows/pointers are external. Another problem that can generate the results you're seeing are self-intersecting surfaces, ...


4

Given my limited familiarity with all the CAD tools that exist, I would fall back to something that I know does binary operations on volumes -- openScad. One can create two objects, one from each of the two STL files, and subtract one from the other. One can also compute intersections, unions, and other operations. There are probably other programs that ...


4

There is no way to estimate the print time of an STL file directly. The print time is based on the number of instructions in the g-code file plus the time it takes to move the effector (the hot end) around the build area. The only way to compute that is to know what settings their slicer is using and then slice your stl the way they will; and this is ...


4

I see you've accepted cmm's answer, but I'd still like to take a stab at the mechanism of the failure based on your comment on it: Excellent explanation, thanks. The "WTH" cylinder is centered on the queen piece, and that has a sphere with lots of faces on top. So it looks like the "kink" is inside the queen where the sphere and the base cube overlap, and ...


4

The two formats contain the same information about the model, but the binary format is much more compact, so it will produce smaller files from the same part but they should work the same. That's to say, if you take the exact same model, save it as a binary STL and as an ASCII STL, the binary STL file will take up fewer bytes on disk. The number of triangles ...


4

You should always pick the binary option. ASCII files are larger and slower to save and load. There's no reason to ever use ASCII unless you are using software that is incompatible with binary files. Could the final model be affected by the format chosen at the time of saving? In practice, the model will not be affected by either choice. There are some ...


4

Huh. On a hunch I just changed a copy of a .3mf model to have a .zip file extension, and what do you know, it works! 3mf is just a set of compressed xml. The zip folder structure I saw included a MetaData folder. I bet you could put just about anything you wanted in there, as long as it doesn't conflict with things other 3mf parsers are expecting to find. ...


4

I think it depends on your use case. As Bobt already commented, Meshmixer is a common tool for editing STLs. But also a lot of CAD-Tools should be able to import STLs. Then there is also of course Blender. As you didn't specify what you want to use it for, I would guess you just want to do some quick fixes to the mesh. The tool I use is Meshmixer. It's ...


4

Rhino gives the following output for MeshRepair Mesh has 3 degenerate faces. (a face that's actually a line or a point) Mesh has 42 non manifold edges. (a line where 3 or more faces meet, possibly caused by degenerate faces) Mesh has 6 duplicate faces. (faces that share the same coordinates) Mesh has 148 naked edges (edges that have only one face) All of ...


4

There are several problems at work here: Internal Geometry & unjoined parts Missing Surfaces Generally inverted surfaces: every surface is inside out! Fixing it! Step 1: add missing surfaces. Select the vertices around the hole that has no bottom surface and then pres F to create a surface. Use several steps, making roughly triangle surfaces. For ...


3

You could try to: Slice with slicer (Cura in my case) with support enabled. Search for text: TYPE:SUPPORT G0 F1800 X237.873 Y184.24 G0 X233.869 Y183.237 ;TYPE:SUPPORT G1 F1500 E562.81355 G1 F900 X233.579 Y183.939 E562.91577 G1 X233.368 Y184.67 E563.01816 If it exists, then try to call it again: Use auto-orientation plugin to validate if there is a better (...


3

This may not be your cuppa tea, but if you're willing to learn to use OpenSCAD or already know how, there's a Thingiverse post that appears to directly address your objective. Correction, this particular post on Thingiverse consists of a series of Python files, of which I have zero experience/qualifications. It may still be of value, if you are Python ...


3

Typically you would install a (free) 3D model program as Fusion 360, FreeCAD, or many more options to choose from. Once installed, import the STL file and use menu options to export a picture of your STL. Alternatively, if you have some programming skills, you could import the STL file in OpenSCAD and render and export a picture from there. Simply create an ...


3

It depends very much on the molding company, and how much engineering service you can afford to buy from them. Some will remodel your entire part anyway, to make it suitable for molding. Others will only accept specific formats and parts that are engineered 100 % ready to be molded. So talk to them first, if they only use your file as a template, it ...


3

The fact you may be able to produce a STP file is no guarantee the company will be able to injection mold it. You should ask the intended recipient of the file what are the actual requirements they need for making the injection mold. STEP and STL are not two different ways to store the same information. They are two different standards with different ...


3

I've been able to manipulate an STL file using the hobbyist version (free) of Fusion 360. There's a series of steps involved that may require some research and experimentation, at least it did in my case. One loads the STL file into Fusion 360 by using Insert, Mesh. Once loaded, turn off history. The next step is to convert the mesh file to BREP. In that ...


3

"Not ready for printing" isn't a very specific description of a problem. There are countless things that could be wrong with an STL file that could render it unprintable. An STL file is basically a collection of triangles in 3D. These triangles need to be manifold/watertight: they need to enclose a volume that represents the object to be printed. For ...


3

Basically there's no good easy way to do this. At this point you only have the mesh - a list of triangles - the 3D model you have does not contain the concept of joints or moving parts so it can't regenerate the shoulder after the rotation. The original author may or may not have the ability to do this, depending on his workflow and software. If all you ...


3

.stl Basics The .stl format has no inherent sense of which units you use. items are to scale to an ambiguous 1, which could be 1 meter, one millimeter, one lightyear or one inch. To a .stl, only the relative sizing matters. All these faces you see are compared to a line with the length of 1-unit that is Slicer-Modeling Software interaction The most common ...


3

Alright so I asked in my facebook group and a friendly fellow game me the tip to use Meshmixer from AutoCAD and then check a video on Plane cut. I only needed 3 simple cuts and the piece I needed was all ready to print. :) 40 Minutes to print and only 3g of PLA to spend :)


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