14

I have a bunch of solutions to this problem but I'm always looking for additional ideas. I usually start by slicing as much as possible off with a hobby knife. The more than can be removed before sanding the better. For big prints I like big generic sandpaper sheets from the hardware store. Starting with the highest grit and moving down. Make sure you're ...


11

You could modify it as shown in my picture. I added lines tangent to the 11mm circle and in this example I set them to a 40 degree overhang which should be fine, the top line is also tangent to the circle and in my experience it's easier to bridge a small section rather than do a bunch of small overhangs like an arc would do. You still end up with quite a ...


9

I think a lot of this depends on the slicing engine you're using as to what options you have. I use MakerWare (now MakerBot Desktop) which has many options for the support scaffolding as well as other useful settings for your situation. As someone else stated, adjusting the distance (even slightly) can make a world of difference in how easy the supports are ...


7

I've had great success printing with HIPS (high-impact polystyrene) as a support for both PLA and ABS. Most sites recommend it for use with ABS because the materials melt at similar temperatures and work best with heated beds, but I've had good luck using it as a support material with PLA on a bed at 60°C. It doesn't stick as well to PLA as it does to ABS, ...


7

I use normal wet/dry sandpaper and it works just fine. If I remember correctly, I usually start with 220 and then work my way up to 400, 600, and 800. There are also foam or rubber sanding pads available that work really well when you're sanding something organically shaped. The grits you start and finish with will depend on how rough your surface is.


7

I use nail files. They're easy to get, cheap and have different grits on either side. You can lay them flat or hold them in your hand and they have some stability making it fairly easy to sand something that is or should become flat. Plus, you can fix any nails you damage while removing support structures.


6

If your printer is printing support material that is too strongly attached, you can increase the space between the support and the part in some slicing softwares. On Cura it is located in the "expert settings" menu (you can open it by pressing Ctrl + E), under the "Support" text. Try fiddling with the "Z distance" setting until you find the right setting. ...


6

I believe the post by @tbm0115, covers many of the general options. However, I would also consider installing additional fans to improve cooling of the model during printing. As pointed out by this excellent article, installing a fan can significantly reduce issues the from printing overhangs. Regarding the type of fan to get, they stated that: It seems ...


6

PETG works as support material for PLA, see video In theory, PLA printed on top of PETG will be fine because PETG softens and gets sticky at higher temperatures. Printing PETG support on top of PLA may cause remelting of PLA, but if PETG is kept quite cold (220 °C) the issue will likely be minor. As shown in the video, it ...


5

I know many Slic3r users - myself included - add support material to the model itself before importing it into Slic3r. I personally favour MeshMixer for support generation, as the supports are much more predictable and easily removable. In complicated cases I also add supports in my CAD software. Although a not free, the support generation in Simplify3D ...


5

Here are all the ways I can think of: Turn the temperature down just a little, which may reduce sagging Crank up cooling, like bigger fan(s) aimed at the print, so it solidifies faster Change orientation when possible (not in this case) Use soluble support material, and wash it away afterwards (requires 2-head printer) Pause the print as you go up, and ...


5

Advice From Taulman On emailing Taulman asking for advice (after getting some initial failed prints), they responded with the following: [...W]e use the following settings. Support: Flow 115 % Infill = 8-10 % 2 full surfaces at 100 % Support speed 50 % of print speed. What I've learned trying to apply that advice: ...


5

I have tried to print the piece upside-down with the cave part facing down and it worked. Since the printer prints upside down, positioning the cave part facing up creates a suction-cup effect on the printer display that makes the whole structure stick to the lcd and detach from the supporting structure, thus making the print fail.


4

Another method that you could try is an acetone vapor bath. (All credit to them, by the way) Just so you know, this is a very risky method, but the outcome is very nice. Remember that I warned you... And please, please watch cautionary videos and practice extreme caution. I cannot stress that enough. All you have to do is get a heating pad (or anything ...


4

Wash-away filament used for support in PLA printing is typically PVA, which is completely water soluble and may serve your purpose. It is easily 3D printed as the primary filament and attaches well to the build plate. Many 3D printer filament suppliers will carry this type of support material. It is important to keep it in a sealed bag with desiccant as it ...


3

I haven't tried this myself, but the recommended way I've seen for dealing with the high cost of PVA is to print the support structure in ABS, PLA, or something else cheap, and print only the interface area (the top of the support where it meets the model) in PVA.


3

No FDM print at all. The problem of your design will not be the materials, but a basic property of FDM printing: FDM Printers do create a structure by placing a long string of filament next to itself and ontop of itself, creating tons of boudaries. These boundaries between the layers are the weak points for this application: Even if the material like ABS ...


3

You can as PLA is not affected by Limonene (the chemical used to dissolve the HIPS) but it is not recommended as the print temperatures for each material (~180C for PLA and ~230C for HIPS) are quite far apart and the PLA may not stick to the HIPS. A better choice would be PVA which prints ~185C and dissolves in water but this material has its own set of fun ...


3

if I printed it in a different orientation it would delaminate too easily If you flip it around, the orientation of the layers would be the same, except that you would print from top to bottom instead of bottom to top. With the arch opening to the top, there would be no overhang. Without overhang, you don't need support structures (red). The holes for ...


3

I see more important things on your photo. Filament layers are not sticked together, even these on the first layer (on the bed). Next is that lines are not staight but they are wavy. This suggests that you should try increase HE temperature set speed of the first layer (20% of normal speed) decrease first layer thickness increase extrude rate for the ...


3

I had to design something rather like this, but I made the part that wraps around the pipe (pipe in my case - bushing in yours) into a separate piece that slotted into the main arch. That way, the main arch could be printed with poor precision on the overhang, and the sleeve was printed on its side. It took a little work to make the slotting system fit ...


3

If you want a 3D printing answer then I see that the part has a few major points of concern to me: Threads (Gosh I hate threads). Tolerance - +/- 0.1 mm-0.2 mm should work fine (in terms of those threads fitting on the top of the bottle) Strength - This needs to be strong, so as to be able to effectively not break when spinning around. In terms of tech ...


2

I have not used Slic3r very much. But my guess is that the settings should still be same. Also, are those rafts? They look incomplete: you might want to check your leveling again. In addition, try to increase your thickness of the support material. Make it squares or something, as that will give much better strength. Furthermore, if there is a setting ...


2

It should be noted that the suggested methods in other answers all have the following disadvantages: The vapor just seems to weaken the print to much faster than print smooths. Sanding melts the plastic pretty easily and just rips the print apart. Filing helps but leaves blemishes that require the whole print to be sanded and/or painted.


2

I normally deburr with a deburring tool: Then I file if needed, then I hit it with a scotch brite pad: And then I give it a quick pass with a heat gun to darken all the areas that have turned lighter from the abrasion. Video showing heat gun (but not scotch brite): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Aj9WCabPgw


2

I'd say the clue is the material itself and the geometry of the object. But in terms of Slic3r settings you could experiment with: (print settings >> support material) pattern spacing (he has here something around 5mm) pattern (I'd say the best for you is rectlinear) contact z distance (choose 0.2 or close to that) interface layers (here 0 (zero) for sure) ...


2

I believe this is on-topic because it describes my experience using PVA in a Prusa i3m3-MMU2 machine. My experience has not been good. I started with a new spool, and dried it between attempts. The problems may be specific to the Prusa MMU2 printing process, but some are intrinsic in PVA, or at least the PVA filament I've been trying, PrimaSelect PVA+ (...


2

I do think that FDM is possible for this item. Polyamide (nylon) would be my first choice for this, as it has great interlayer strength and it is very impact resistant and durable. Its failure mode will be permanent bending and stretching rather than cracks or a clean break like common FDM plastics like PLA and ABS. I also needed a filament to simulate PP ...


1

There appear to be at least two papers which revolve around the use of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) filaments. This proposal/article, from Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology 30 July 2015 seems to, at least, partially fit your criteria, 3D Printing by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) of a Swellable/Erodible Capsular Device for Oral Pulsatile ...


1

The video treats about sodium polucarbonate ‎(C3H3NaO2) this is a superabsorbent polymer has the ability to absorb as much as 100 to 1000 times its mass in water. This is used as desiccant on products that moisture can be a problem basically during storage prior selling. The video shows the water how is trapped inside the particles of sodium polycarbonate, ...


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