11

No, this is not possible with most ATX power supplies. While in principle you can get a 24V supply by combining the +12V and -12V supplies, the rails are not symmetric, and the negative 12V supply is usually designed for a much lower load than the positive supply. In the example in the following picture, there are two positive 12V rails, capable of sourcing ...


8

If your multimeter can handle the voltage, it should be safe. 12 V should be in the capability range of common multimeters, so I would tend to say yes, - but make sure that your multimeter can handle the voltage and be sure it is set to voltage mode in the appropriate range (if set to current measurement mode for example, it will not survive). Also ...


8

No, do not use this fuse. The current rating is too high to be reasonable for your printer. It will "work" in the sense that your printer will get power, but it won't provide anywhere near as much protection as a lower-rated fuse. 10A is a lot of current for mains voltage. Depending on what else you have plugged in, there is a fair chance your home's 15A ...


8

The most important "safety" advantage when using 24V (compared to 12V) is that to get the same power, you only need half the current. A 192W heated bed would need 16A at 12V, but only 8A at 24V. Since one of the most common safety issues is underrated screw terminals being used for the heated bed (just search for "3d printer fire"; you'll find quite a few ...


8

In the world of (cheap) printers, "MOSFET" has taken on a meaning of its own. For a long time, 3D printers have had MOSFETs on board of their motherboards to switch the heated bed. In the past two years or so, we've seen a surge of (mainly) Chinese printers where the on-board MOSFETs (or, more often, the terminal blocks) weren't rated for the high current ...


6

Changing the PSU with one with a higher amperage will not make the bed heat up any faster unless the PSU is underrated for the amperage required and the voltage is dropping as a result of the load. This can be checked by measuring the output voltage with a multimeter (when the PSU is loaded e.g. by a heating heat bed). In this case, the PSU has a marginal ...


6

I have a Kill-A-Watt meter so I got a pretty good measurement for you with my Anet A6. Like Petar said each model is different but this should give you a idea. When heating both the nozzle and heat bed the printer consumes 160 W of power, once to temp it backs down to 9 W (it also uses 9 W when just "sitting doing nothing and is on"). When the ...


6

A MK2 heatbed will draw around 12A. The motors and hotend draw only very little power (around 2A, 5A peak), so the 30A supply you have has significant headroom (it is often recommended to derate a power supply by 20%, so a 30A supply would be good for 24A - you're still well under that). It should work fine, even given its dubious provenance. Winter versus ...


6

I suggest looking at the maximum amperage draw for all components that could be on at one time, and then find a power supply that can supply at least 20% more current. You would never want to get a supply rated for lower current than your max draw, because then it will affect the torque or your motors, or the temperature to which your heaters can get. ...


5

It is okay to just use bare wires in the type of screw connector found on your power supply. They're designed for it; they have a little plate under the screw that prevents the wires from being frayed by the screw. If you want neater wire termination, you should use one of the spade type ones. Pick the smallest size that fits your wires. PC power cords are ...


4

Very basically speaking, electricity works like this: There's some source that delivers a certain voltage. You have a device that operates at a certain voltage. The device voltage and supply voltage should always match. No, don't put that 120V US device in a 230V outlet in Europe. The device does something. By doing something it draws current. Most devices ...


4

No doubt it's just a final tuning potentiometer. Even on the pictures you linked it's described as V adj which stands for voltage adjustment. It's a way to tune your power supply's output as it can vary depending on temperature/humidity/wall-plug voltage/etc. It's usually set properly and doesn't need to be touched. But you can connect a multimeter to check ...


4

The fuse rating is same as described on the board - so that shall be no issue with it. My main concern is why the fuse is down? Was there a short-circuit? As this is mains fuse - that suggest a big-bang, so, please check carefully hot-end and bed heater connections before restarting the device, to avoid replacing another fuse.


3

If the fuse blows - there is a reason for that, so changing it for a higher rating without understanding the source of the problem is: Asking for fire!!! Every stepper has its own internal resistance (and as we have a magnetic field it is called a reluctance), that is limiting the max current, but this equation needs to take U given to the motor. A ...


3

A short, figurative answer from the electronical point of view: A power supply (an an analogy you can view it as a water pump) as used by 3D printers is usually supplying a fixed voltage (a constant pressure going into your pipe system), in your case 24V. The given amperage/current (the amount of water that actually flows) that is actually utilized at a ...


3

It's somewhat unclear what you mean by "standard PC cable", but virtually all desktop computers use IEC C14 sockets/IEC C13 plugs. Such connectors/sockets are rated for 10A 250V and thus you can safely assume that the cord itself will also be able to handle this voltage and current. 10A is what is specified by the IEC, certain North American standards ...


3

You need all components that are supplied voltage by the RAMPS board to be able to deal with a 24V input. Some of your parts are most likely compatible, as the stepper drivers. Others get the 5V from the Arduino, as the endstops. Some will most likely need replacement, as the Hotend heater cartridge. It will need to be exchanged. You can easily buy those in ...


3

The block on the supply will accept the bare wire you could use the yellow in the middle on the right, but the screw on the block essentially does its own crimp.


3

Part Analysis Let's see what we have: The fuse in the driver is set to keep up the loads that the driver can safely handle. The NEMA 17 results in a blown out fuse Conclusion The problem lies not in the driver, but the NEMA 17 motor or the wires to it and can be of several ways: The motor has a short and is defective. The motor is not rated to the driver ...


2

The power supply that you posted is 12v 360w. This means that (in the USA with 120v power), it will draw 3 amps at 120v. Your switch is rated for 10A at 250V so it works. The switch should be placed to interrupt the HOT wire coming from the wall to your power supply. If you happen to be using 240v power, it is also safe as you would be drawing 1.5 amps ...


2

At 250V a rating for 10A means 2500 Watts, which is fairly enough to use with a typical 3D printer. Make sure that the wire you use to connect the switch to the power supply can also take the current you need. Easiest way to get a cable that is safe to use is salvaging a mains cable from other devices. I would not use wires that were made for low power use ...


2

It could be several things. Your ramps board is overheating or has to much load on it. If you're not cooling the ramps board adding a fan may help the issue. I know Robo3D had this issue and started shipping with a fan to cool the ramps board. The ramps/arduino board could be faulty, the firmware may have gotten corrupted or the current version has a bug ...


2

THHN wire is thermoplastic high heat-resistant nylon coated wire. THWN is thermoplastic heat- and moisture-resistant nylon coated wire. "T" stands for thermoplastic insulation covering the wire itself. "H" stands for a heat resistance of the insulation max 167°F. "HH" stands for a heat resistance, but increased max 194°F. "W" is for moisture resistant. "N" ...


2

Applying 12v to a 24v heater cartridge won't damage anything, but you may have severe issues reaching and maintaining your target temp. A standard E3D heater cartridge is 40w. When you run a 24v cartridge on 12v, you only get 10w of heater power. Here are some rough estimates on where your hot block heat goes: Uninsulated hot block air losses: ~20w ...


2

Vr usually stands for variable resistor, basically a pot. Usually by adjusting this you would adjust the voltage output on most power supplies, ensure you double check your voltage output with a meter after adjusting.


2

Thanks! I confirmed that there isn't such a G-code. I sent a pull request to make this posible: https://github.com/MarlinFirmware/Marlin/pull/6671 Now, "M80 S" reports the current state of the power supply.


2

I don't see one at http://reprap.org/wiki/G-code so it's probably safest to set the power supply to the state you want.


2

I have had the same Issue with my Maker select prusa printer, the way I found that best combats this is to attach the printer to a UPS and avoid attaching any High draw devices from the same circuit. Every Time i'd switch something on, My TV, my lights, etc. The same would happen. Hope this helps!


2

I've used a similar cheap psu before. It'll work without blowing up but my heatbed struggled to get up to 60c, swapped psus with one I had lying around from a desktop and there was a huge difference.


1

@TomvanderZanden's comment is right. You have probably damaged your motherboard and/or driver boards by applying 34 volts. You should never exceed rated voltages. It might help to study stepper motor driver circuits a bit. Stepper drivers usually act as current sources, not as voltage sources. They typically have a high-frequency switch that applies ...


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