6

Too Hot If you're printing too hot (with any filament, not just PLA) you're going to see stringing and blobs/oozing because the material is getting runny and exiting the nozzle in an uncontrolled manner. Because it's uncontrolled, you will also likely see artifacts showing up in your prints. You might also see your filament burning. Instead of coming out of ...


4

70 °C is a specialty filament. It is well below the MIN_TEMP defined in any sane firmware. In Marlin, you can't turn on the extruder in any way, while this is online. You do need to define your firmware to allow such a print - either by dropping the value in the firmware or disabling Mintemp-protection and then flashing that firmware. That is quite invasive. ...


3

In Cura Machine Settings, add M302 S70. Apparently, M302 P1 and M302 S0 do nothing, you need to define a non-zero minimum, and in my case, 70. Thanks to 0scar and Trish for your help.


3

I've only annealed PEEK personally, but a quick search returns varying recommendations: All3DP recommends 1 hour at 70 °C. X3D recommends 1 hour at 110 °C. Matterhackers recommends 10 minutes at 105 °C for Tough PLA or HTPLA. A post on Reddit recommends "a few hours" at 110 °C. I'd do a test suite with pieces at 70 °, 90 °, and 110 °C for an ...


3

The glass transition temperature is not always indicative of strength. Some polymers are solid well above that temperature, see https://omnexus.specialchem.com/polymer-properties/properties/glass-transition-temperature for all the polyethylene, for example. What you need is the heat deflection temperature, which is very seldomly provided in the datasheets. ...


2

Searching the error message "Heating Failed: Bed Printer Halted, Please Reset" seems to indicate that the bed heater is timing out from not reaching temperature. If you measure the voltage applied to the bed heater before the error message, does the voltage stay at Max.; i.e. 12 V for a 12 V bed heater? Or, does the voltage stay constant? If you ...


2

I don't think your temperature based explanation makes sense. This looks to me just like a first layer smashed against the bed, possibly too much due to nozzle being too low, followed by underextrusion when there's actually the right amount of space to extrude into. If you have fewer than 3 top layers or less than 0.6 mm of top layer thickness, you will ...


2

80 °C is way too hot for the bed with PLA. The highest bed temperature you can use without serious deformation of the printed part is around the glass transition temperature of the material - 55-60 °C for PLA. And even that will seriously inhibit the cooling of layers near the bed. Below 40 °C or even unheated is ideal to avoid warping. Go back to reasonable ...


1

Usually the filament spool will have a range of temperatures for the best nozzle temperatures and bed temperatures to use. To answer your quesstion there are several considerations. Not all PLA's are the same and that is probably even more so with PLA+. That is where the temperatures written on the spool come in handy. Optimum temperatures will vary for ...


1

Firts of, I created a quick simplified simulation in Matlab of cooling from 210°C to bellow 50°C. Here is a plot showing the difference in temperature curves in time. As stated, it is simplified, because I guessed that a printed piece can get from 210 deg to 50 in less than 5 seconds when cooled properly to room temperature. I used this differential equation:...


1

Maybe you're thinking of 'Vortex Cooling' which uses a tuned vortex tube to create hot and cold airstreams. The Wikipedia example uses 100 SCFM of filtered compressed air at 100 PSI to create a 70 °C temperature differential. Here's one on Amazon which is targeted at milling applications. Here's another...


1

If there isn't a TDS on the manufacturer's website, you could email them and ask for it. If they won't give it to you, you could ask for the SDS to see if it has any additives. Polymaker has a TDS for every filament they make on their website, so I would recommend their filament for your purposes. I would also suggest you pay more attention to the heat ...


1

CNC Kitchen has a series of videos covering research on this topic, ending up with using salt. The oven temperature used for PLA was 200˚C reaching 190˚C at the core of the salt. Lower temperatures (especially without support) are of much more questionable value. From my experience, I believe that similar results might be ...


1

I was wondering if it had something to do with my Z axis and BLTouch. When I unplugged the Z Axis on the printer the extruder wouldn't lower only raise so I plugged it back in and it moves in the right directions. The mother board I'm using is a SKR E3 Mini V2 and the BLTouch is 3.1 On that version motherboard the BLTouch plug has all 5 wires combined in one ...


1

There are ESD safe nylon filaments available, but even they will be well above their glass transition (= softening and sagging under their own weight) before they get up to 165 °C. What I'd recommend is looking for a method to resin print the parts and add your ESD protection as a post-process. Most UV cure resins are thermoset, in that they won't soften at ...


1

I found this article which seems to suggest PTFE is a good choice of plastic for a cryogenic environment. I've read that there are PTFE filaments available for FDM printers, though there are some caveats. First, you will need an all-metal hot end; enough heat to melt a PTFE filament will melt the PTFE filament guide if it is in contact with the nozzle. ...


1

The firmware has a fixed limit for the bed, this is also the maximum value you can set through the LCD interface, the default is e.g. set in the configuration file for Marlin, it contains the following constant definition: #define BED_MAXTEMP 150 But, you will most properly never reach this value, even worse, most beds won't even reach 110 °C. At ...


1

The only time I've seen lifting, away from the edges of the part like this, is when the bed is contaminated with something which will stop the print sticking, like fingerprints and such. A thorough wipe-down with IPA on the heated bed is usually enough to stop it.


1

I was having the same issue after installing BTT SKR Mini E3 V2 and BLTouch on my Ender 5 Pro. I did two things and my bed heats normally now, but I changed/did both things and can't say which fixed the issue for me. I noticed the case fan wasn't coming on. I had it plugged into Fan 1 on the board. In my Marlin firmware, I noticed in Configuration_adv.h the ...


1

This is varying underextrusion due to loss of material to oozing in the interior of the model. When printing the infill pattern, the nozzle doesn't follow a single continuous extrusion path, but moves from the end of one path to the beginning of the next, and under Cura defaults, does this without retracting the filament. This causes unpredictable amounts to ...


1

Your firmware has set a limit of 270 °C, normally, (default Marlin configured value) this is 275 °C. It appears that the Anet E10 developers have edited the value if you cannot exceed the 270 °C setpoint. The configuration file for Marlin firmware has the following maximum temperature limit set for the first hotend: #define HEATER_0_MAXTEMP 275 You can ...


1

In CuraEngine's FffGcodeWriter::finalize method, G-code to zero the bed and enclosure temperature is only written if the machine profile defines a heated bed/enclosure, so you could in theory avoid the cooldown by telling Cura your machine doesn't and putting the heatup commands in your custom start gcode instead of letting Cura emit them itself. However it ...


1

3.9 ohms is a 12V heater. It won't work on 24V.


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