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If you have 3D software like Blender you can import your model and use the decimate modifier to lower the number of vertices and then re-export. Here is a link to how you can do this: Simplify Geometry with the Decimate Modifier in Blender 2.9.


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For your purposes, consider that Meshmixer (free) can open .OBJ files and display them in any position you desire. I use Meshmixer quite a bit for model editing, but have not used it for .OBJ files with textures. I searched my drive and found quite a few .OBJ files, but was not able to present or add textures, due to my own ignorance, I'm sure. I found a ...


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If you need just a graphical 3D look at them, opening them in any slicing program should create a graphic visualization in relation to the print grid - in glorious 3D. Slicers don't allow to place textures on them though. One of the most common slicers among hobbyists, Ultimaker Cura, comes also as a linux distribution, just like a couple more reviewed on ...


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If you're using the term "supports" to mean the extra material that the 3D printer needs to allow material to be deposited in "mid-air," your slicer will have a setting that permits this. Knowing which slicer is going to be used would enable someone to advise you directly of the location of the settings. If you are going to be using a 3D ...


1

Consider using Clara.io (100% free): Export your Tinkercad project as OBJ. Import in Clara.io Texture and render. Clara.io is 100% web based. It is simple to learn if you have prior experience with other 3D renderers. If you don't, the learning curve might be steep though... But : you have access to VRAY which in a free-to-use package, is simply awesome......


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