10

After much trial and error, I think I finally figured out the solution. Even though I could get better prints by tweaking with the temperatures, I could never totally eliminate the problem. The better I made it look by cooling down the bed, the more likely it would break free and the print would fail completely. At one point though I happened to print ...


9

It turned out I had the wrong filament size set in Ultimaker Cura. Fixing this resolved the issue.


8

Prints could end up on tray for couple of reasons. Vacuum force on early layers - Usually you should lose pieces on the center of platform Put holes or channels on platform Very slow speed on early layers Use smaller platform Use tilt mechanism Use larger support structures Use stickier platform - Anodized aluminum is specially good Non-aligned platform ...


8

Banding usually refers to Z banding and manifests itself in a wavy/non-straight wall in Z direction: This sort of banding is related to mechanical or design issues of the printer (lead screw (nuts), belts, play, etc.) Your print, however, shows local thicker walls. It appears that these local thicker parts are related to the change in direction of the ...


7

There are multiple issues that cause this result. First, your nozzle is to far from the bed. This can be seen by the curly deposited filament on the build plate (I guess that is the brim or the skirt). Please properly level the bed and position the nozzle at a distance of a plain A4 paper as best as possible (should be doable as you have a glass sheet that ...


6

A very helpful page for troubleshooting common errors is: Print Quality Troubleshooting Guide - Lines on the Side of Print It seems like your problem is inconsistent extrusion or temperature variation. From the photo you posted I guess that you use a big diameter nozzle. Keep in mind that your extruder might not be well equipped to deliver such a large ...


6

To answer your question directly, this action (Click to resume...) is triggered by a buffer overflow of the Marlin firmware that is caused by the repetitive sending of M105 command by Ultimaker Cura (without checking the result). This problem is a reported problem and fixed in the next release of Ultimaker Cura (please do note that as of posting this answer,...


6

The second motor is hot. And the third is very hot. I can not even touch it. This is to some degree, completely normal and expected. From the datasheet for a typical NEMA 17 stepper, the rated temperature rise is 80 °C above ambient and the maximum operating temperature is 130 °C (implying an ambient temperature of 50 °C). It is normal that stepper motors (...


5

Here are some further details on: The control board, and; The stepper motors Control board The electronics board has this marking: EJE Electronics Gubbels Engineering The serial number is 0070-003 According to this site Xinchejian First Mendel V2 Reprap the board is: Gen6 Electronics, with AT Mega 644p processor (PCB EJE Electronics, Gubbels ...


5

Oh interesting. By slips, I take it you mean that the raw filament slips, not the print slips. This will happen for a few reasons. First the tooth gear that grabs the plastic is either: Worn out Out of place Not the correct distance from the guide wheel. This is all part of the mechanism that the Smart Extruder attaches TO. Not the Smart Extruder itself. ...


5

I had this same problem. I attributed it to the linear bearings which ride on the 8mm travel rods. I did two things which ultimately eliminated the issue (since I did both at the same time, I'm not sure which solved the issue, but believe it's #1 below): I replaced all of my ball type (stock) linear bearings with Igus Drylin linear bearings. I'm pretty sure ...


5

No, the bed does not look too close to the nozzle, it could well be that it is too far from the nozzle. However, the brim looks okay, but the method you follow is questionable. Using a feeler gauge of 0.2 mm is larger than the recommended paper method which is in the order of half that value (0.1 mm). You compensate this larger leveling gap with ...


5

I had the exact same problem as you. And after trying all of your ideas (Thanks so much for the amound of information!!!), I discovered that in my case, the problem was actually the printer skipping a step every other layer (at the beginning), which lead to the exact same thing, the bottom layers being "compressed", leading to a lower height in general (and ...


5

Yes I had a somewhat similar clog once, and I could fix it back up. However, it is a lot of work. Hobbyist Way Step 1: heat As long as the heater cartridge is still ok, just fire up the printer, move up the printhead by 50 mm and wait some two or three minutes till the goop is warmed enough at the core to melt. Set the hotend to 200 °C and no cooling fan. ...


5

Cura has some settings for the support structure which may help. Somewhere in the full Preferences menu is a setting for "gap at top" or equivalent wording. If you increase that gap slightly, the support material will be less strongly bonded to the part. Be careful, since a huge gap could lead to bridging problems.


5

Special characters like Ä Ö or Ü in the stl-filename resulted in Ultimaker Cura creating a comment of the filename in the g-code that read like ;MESH:Loki_hörner_v2.stl This apparently could not be parsed by the Anet A8, leading to an error and halt.


5

Waves in printed surfaces with FFF are observed at either the bottom layer (common) or the top layer (less common). Waves in bottom layer Rippling/wave generation/wrinkling is a common problem for first layer to occur and has a direct relation to the print nozzle to bed distance; a too short of a distance or over-extrusion can lead to this effect. However, ...


5

Underextrusion and clogs can also be caused by insufficient temperature in the hot end. You've not reference your temperatures, so consider to use a test model and print at different temperatures. Too low temps can result in the problem you present, while too hot temps will increase stringing and peculiar blobs on the print. If your slicer changes print ...


5

If a temperature of (rounded) 201 °C is triggering TRP, then one of three things is the culprit: The TRP Hysteresis is awfully trigger happy. See What is Thermal Runaway Protection? Your Heater cartridge is not properly mounted and has a bad connection to the heater block and upon heating and expecting a much higher temperature but not measuring the ...


5

I found the problem. This model of printer Monoprice Select v2 has bed warping issues so when the bed heated up it would warp severely. I bought a glass bed and all my problems were solved.


4

If the filament displayed in the photo is the result of unimpeded extrusion from your nozzle, you don't have or have not described a problem. Filament extruded from a hot nozzle will react to many things. If a slight air temperature change is created on one side of the extruding filament, it will cool faster than the other side and curve in the direction of ...


4

I also had issues with the first layer sticking to the build plate and I did not want to sand the plate. As most people will mention you need to make sure that your plate is perfectly level and the z height is right (lots of friction on the paper). You also need the correct exposure times for your resin and the first few layers should get 60 seconds of ...


4

You see this for a few reason. First you are going too fast and you are getting belt shift from the whip lash. You can mitigate that by going slower and adjusting your Jerk settings to lower. Though usually this is not a consistent wall. Usually you see this. That said it is likely you have not adjusted the current to your stepper motors correctly. I don't ...


4

Your bed is obviously capable of heating up, so I would double check your cable for any kinks, cuts, blow-outs, or general connection issues both where your machine rests during warm-up and Z0 where your machine begins printing. Most likely there is a poor connector or kinked/cut wire for the build plate. If that doesn't appear to be the issue, I might ...


4

Check your slicer settings. Some slicers allow the temperature to change at a specified layer. You may have programmed the slic3r to turn off the bed after the first (or maybe zeroth) layer. You call also examine the G-code for M140, M144, and M190 commands. Of course, the usual intermittent electric connections, power supply failures, etc. should ...


4

To me, it looks like your G-code induces an incomplete layer of support on the still standing piece, which later down leads to the print failing. Re-slice the whole thing. As a matter of fact, I would cut the model in its widest place and print both with the large face flat on the surface and glue the two pieces together after printing. That way I can ...


4

The symptoms you describe hint to heat creep. Heat creep is the gradual increase in temperature of the cold end assembly (cooling fins and heat break). This gradual temperature increase leads to too high filament temperatures and as such premature filament softening. In combination with (large) retraction settings, this can lead to clogging of the nozzle. ...


4

Your video shows that your bed seems warped somewhat. Ammount of error As I assume you did level the bed with a sheet of paper to be 0.1 mm thick, we can estimate the change of thickness. The thickest point seems to be 0.2 mm, the thinnest 0.05. that's in average an error of 0.075 mm for the first layer. If you can live with that, no need to touch it. Fixing ...


4

Avoid naming .gcode files with non-ASCII characters (this includes EASCII) I know of no firmware on a printer that can handle files that have characters not present in the set of 95 non-control American Standard Code for Information Interchange characters by default. Marlin, for example, can't process the characters ä ö ü & € as these all are missing in ...


4

Might just be that you are bridging without collapsing but still have some visible sag. Things to try: 1) increase the support/infil density. If slic3r has a configurable setting like Cura does, you only need to increase the density for the last couple mm prior to the top layer. 2) increase the top plate thickness (number of extruded layers). This often ...


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