4

Piecing this answer together from the comments on OP's post. Myself and R.. noted that a layer height of 0.35 mm, nozzle width of 1.2 mm, and a fairly high feedrate (200 % according to OP, no reference to what 100 % is), is an exceptionally large amount of plastic to try and melt through almost any hotend on the market except possibly the ...


4

This is a common issue, there are a number of problems that could cause an extruder motor on the Ender 3 to skip steps besides the stepper needing an increase in current. If the extruder motor is missing steps--which usually results in a periodic clicking noise--this is likely due to one of the following common problems. Nozzle is too close to bed Print ...


3

OK, I have my Ender 3 back to printing nice looking objects. It turns out at some point since the original bad E-stepper I must have pushed the "load settings" menu item. I set my E steps to 98 from 93. and then did a "save settings". I have no idea why going from 93 to 98.03 increased my extrusion from 40mm to 100mm (trial and error, because the formula ...


3

The helical exterior is an indicator of a filament diameter mismatch or volumetric mode enabled for linear commands From ref: Then you probably enabled volumetric extrusion by accident. On LCD go to Control Filament Disable Save EEPROM Revert estep cal if applicable. What is it? M200 Its a feature of Marlin firmware ...


3

What you refer to as weak walls in fact are under-extruded walls. This can be caused by multiple sources, but, since the print recovers this most probably is caused by filament that is entangled on the spool (this causes more friction for the extruder and as such less flow, so under-extrusion; like as if the filament is being pulled back). Any other source ...


2

The skirt looks ok, which tends to rule out the most extreme flow or blockage issues. However, skirt/bottom layer can be over-squashed so not ideal for calibration. I assume this is intended to be a 100% layer rather than infill. It looks like you're achieving about 50% infill, which is a good clue. I guessed (and confirmed in comments) that you are set ...


2

Time to check things that usually don't need checking. At this point I would check the power split. Check the power supply voltage (+12V or maybe +24V, I don't know the printer) at the controller before and after the extrusion stops or sputters. Assure that the voltage stays the same. If it drops you have a culprit. While there, also check the +5V. ...


2

Localized underextrusion usually means you're oozing material somewhere it wasn't supposed to go. Since you have Marlin 2.0, linear advance might help solve that, and in general right retraction amount is important and turning off combing may be needed (combing over infill allows material to ooze). Also there are reported bugs in Marlin 2.0 such as https://...


2

If you decrease layer thickness, you should increase bottom and top layer amount, or set it to a fixed shell thickness. The thinner the layers the more difficult to span over the infill (there is much less filament extruded). You could try extra part cooling, higher percentage infill, reduced hotend temperature and slower top layer printing. But, best ...


2

Periodic temperature irregularities, such as cycling between a higher temperature and lower temperature slowly enough that it spends at least a layer or two at a different temperature than other layers has a tendency to be mistaken for z wobble. You can actually intentionally modulate print temperature (at least of PLA) every few layers to great a sort of ...


2

Turns out the filament was the problem, I tried printing a model with a high quality sample PLA filament I had and it printed perfectly; one of the cleanest prints I've had. Never skimp on filament.


2

After I finally had the time to disassemble the extruder and I found a possible culprit - which did solve the issue for some time. As you can see on the pictures the heater block leaked and this lead to some filament dripping off of the side and onto the print. The nozzle then eventually caught these drips and this caused the mess. Here are some tipps for ...


2

Based on your comment to the comment of 0scar: When I go to Fillament, I get: E in mm3: On; Fil. Dia. 1.750 That's almost surely the problem. Unless the model was sliced for "E in mm3", this setting needs to be off. What it does is change how the printer interprets extruder moves in the G-code: rather than in linear mm of filament to move, as volumetric ...


2

I don't think your temperature based explanation makes sense. This looks to me just like a first layer smashed against the bed, possibly too much due to nozzle being too low, followed by underextrusion when there's actually the right amount of space to extrude into. If you have fewer than 3 top layers or less than 0.6 mm of top layer thickness, you will ...


2

This sounds like nothing but a bed leveling (distance from nozzle to bed) problem, though you may have introduced other problems disassembling the hotend. It's normal to have material oozing and bunching up before the print starts; this is why you start printing with a priming line or skirt. Clean the bed well with isopropyl alcohol, level it (paper method ...


2

This is some kind of filament stuck in the hotend tube problem. Just like "heat creep" as mentioned above. PTFE pipes should be checked, all parts should be carefully cleaned. I also add checking the extruder (gears, tightness) to the list. The plastic extruder can structurally loosen or break over time. I switched to metal extruder a long time ago,...


2

200°C is way too cold for printing PETG, especially with the Ender 3's weak extruder (ungeared, single flat hob with minimal contact with the filament) that already struggles with PETG. Probably it barely manages to keep up while the flow is low enough, but starts slipping in the extruder at some point in your print that needs higher flow, and then the torn-...


2

This is a known issue with the v4.2.2 mainboard relating to overheating. Continued overheating will eventually result in the extruder controller on the mainboard going bad. Solution: Mainboard change to version 4.2.7 and raise your unit to create more air flow. You could also add a fan under the printer.


1

I was getting intermittent underextrusion (to the point of brief "ghost printing") with my own Ender 3 over the past few days, after a couple weeks of exemplary operation. In looking the machine over (searching for issues that could cause clogging, for instance), I discovered that the "extruder arm" (the spring loaded arm on the extruder ...


1

If everything is stock on the machine and all other setting are properly configured, this is most likely heat creep. This is caused when the PFTE tubing is not properly set within the hot end itself leaving a small gap. As filament is fed into the hot end and heated to melting, some filament oozes out in the gap between the PFTE tubing and the nozzle. This ...


1

0scar and Trish both had correct solutions to my problem. 0scar suggested that I clean the nozzle, which I thought I had because the needle that came with the printer was able to slide through the hot end and out the nozzle without any issue. Turns out the hot end was clogged though. This particular hot end has a bowden tube that's separate from the actual ...


1

The first photo shows under extrusion. This could indicate either a bad filament, a massive clog or the wrong filament diameter in the slicer. I have experienced, that small demo-reels of filament that come with printers come damaged from the shipping: I have experienced some of them having been exposed to moisture in their zip-lock bags and one time I had ...


1

You are lowering temperature and increase the flow at the same time - which is contradictory (filament is less runny, but you pump more of it). Though 195 °C seems to be very safe for printing PLA at 40 mm/s. Just doublecheck that when you disable motors, and push filament with hand, it melts quickly and easily goes out. Otherwise you will deal with ...


1

If you pulled the Bowden tube out of the hotend and then got this, you almost surely installed it wrong, leaving a gap between the tube and the nozzle for molten filament to fill and jam in. Remove it again with the hotend hot, and if there's a mess inside, look for guides on cleaning it. Then, to reassemble, loosen the fitting from the heat sink by 3/4 to ...


1

I had a similar problem to you with my Ender-3 but now it is fine. There are so many causes of under-extrusion that I doubt I can tell you what is specifically wrong in your case but perhaps I can give you some pointers. In addition to what you have done, check if you can manually extrude the filament by releasing the grip on the filament (depress the lever ...


1

I have a Prusa i3 pro b, and was having a similar issues. Turns out the spring for the plastic extruder feeder can be too slack. I printed these at 2 mm and put it under the spring and it solved my issue.


1

The grooves (notches, more accurately) are acceptable and indicate that your hobbed gear has a good grip on the filament. Many factors will cause your probably-correct diagnosis of under-extrusion. If you are confident that your extrusion settings are correct, you could have this problem from under-temperature on the nozzle. One method to assess this is to ...


1

This sounds as if you have bought an incorrect heater element, e.g. one for 12 V instead of 24 V. The CR-10 uses 24 V. The 12 V cartridge has a lower resistance, so when powered by 24 V, the current is much higher and therefore also the heating power ($ {(\frac{24}{12})}^2 = 4 $ times higher). For details on the calculation, the this ...


1

A filament tangle is one possibility, one alternative is that you are seeing a jam in the extruder. The trigger for a jam might be excessive retraction, heat soak or some other issue with the heat-break. Less likely, you might have an electrical problem which is position dependant. The extrusion-related issues won't necessarily react in an 'obvious' way to ...


1

This isn't stringing. It's failure to adhere to the previous layer, so tension in the newly extruded material just makes it form a straight line until it bonds to something again. Are you used to printing PETG? You didn't mention fan settings, but having any cooling fan at all will cause failure of layers to bond. Your print speed is borderline for PETG, ...


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