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10

There are several programs that could serve as a console to connect to a printer, put let's start somewhere: the USB connection. Connection with USB When connecting the printer via USB for the first time, we will get a notification that some unknown item is connected. If we use windows we can learn what device it decided we now have via the device manager (...


5

Good morning, and welcome to 3D Printing SE. You said: "I can see information from the printer via USB in RepG and through OctoPrint, but can't send any prints, commands or upgrade firmware (I wanted to flash Sailfish 7.7 eventually)." This means that the USB communication is working fine. It isn't a question of drivers or the FTDI interface chip. That ...


4

In addition to this answer, the OctoPrint 3D print server software contains a terminal which you can use to send G-code commands from a browser: OctoPrint In the bottom string input box (under the check mark items) you put in a G-code command, which will be send to the printer when you hit the Send button. If the printer gives a reply to that command, it ...


4

You need to install a web-cam server on your Nettop. Octorint recommends Yawcam for windows and mjpg-streamer for linux. mjpg-streamer: https://github.com/jacksonliam/mjpg-streamer Yawcam: http://www.yawcam.com/ OctoPrint has instructions for installing mjpg-streamer on a raspberry pi. The process should be very similar for a Nettop running Debian so its a ...


3

Your question addresses (USB) computer connection, so that will be addressed in this answer. For connection to the printer, you need 2 things (apart from the apparent things as computer, printer and cable): A working CH340 driver installed on the computer for USB communication with the board, a piece of software to talk to the computer at a bit transfer ...


3

You can find gcode information at the RepRap wiki. The obvious other thing to try is G1 X10 for a move. Octoprint prints by sending the individual file's gcode one line at a time over USB. It appears that the firmware on your printer might not respond to any 'action' commands over gcode, rather than any fault as such with your hardware/software setup. ...


2

Most of the latest Windows 10 systems with high speed USB (USB3.0) fail to recognize USB to Serial connector (which is here: CH430). Try with a decent self powered USB 2.0 hub that has been seen to fix a majority of USB 3.0 port issues, or try by disabling driver signature enforcement on Win10.


2

Try using the provided SD card and SD adapter with Cura to give the printer gcode. If your computer isn't communicating properly with your printer, you can just download Cura 14 (it comes on the SD card) and upload the configuration file (also on the SD card). You can then plug the SD card into your main board and access it via the LCD screen.


2

Unfortunately, no. There are two types of USB devices: host, such as a PC, and device, such as a thumb drive. (Actually, there is a third type, on-the-go, which can act as either.) The Ender 3 mainboard is a USB device which means that it can only connect to a USB host. You cannot directly connect two USB devices, such as the Ender 3 and a thumb drive) and ...


2

Your motherboard is not an MKS GEN L v1.0, it's a MKS SGEN L - unfortunately, a very very naming scheme. Your board is actually a 32-bit board, and must therefore be flashed with Marlin 2.0, built for the 32-bit board. The firmware is then updated by placing it on the SD card and restarting the board, as explained in the documentation for Marlin here


2

If the one in your question is your complete code, a possibility is that your computer is just buffering the output for the serial port, withholding it in memory. Try to add ser.flush() after your last line. This command will... well... flush anything into the buffer through the actual connection.


1

Ok I found the problem. these shameful for me but I decide to share it anyway. I live in apartment that didn't have earth ground in receptacle. Small electrical shock reallly bother me. althought it also destroy some sensitive component mosfet. (current flow through capacitor in switch mode power supply) Then one day I decide to get rid of these. I hammer ...


1

Sounds like a power saver issue. Make sure things like your USB ports, hard drive, or anything you need the printer program to access doesn't turn off in power save.


1

Your new board may have a counterfeit FT232R USB-to-serial interface chip, and the Windows update channel has installed hobbled FTDI drivers that won't work with counterfeit chips. The use of counterfeit FT232R chips is very common with budget 3D printer controllers, and FTDI are trying to discourage their use. Because of this, a lot of manufacturers have ...


1

The process is pretty straightforward, you open a serial connection and send the instructions over the serial connection. The printer reports "OK" when received (not when the command has been executed). You can use pySerial to connect to a USB port with the correct speed, then send the command you want to execute (include the newline char). You ...


1

After trying about 10 USB cables I finally found one that would work with the Ender and Pi. Specifically, it was my Logitech MX Ergo USB cable.


1

It is possible that your board has a cloned FT232R USB-to-serial bridge chip, and FTDI drivers supplied via the Windows update channel will not work with cloned chips. Try using the Windows setup executable from the following page: FTDI Chip: Virtual COM Port Drivers Note that there are no known problems with MacOS and Linux drivers.


1

Ok... So I found a much simpler answer to this. In my device manager I just right clicked the device (Com port 4, the one that wasn't working for me) and allowed windows to update the drivers from the web. This fixed my issue. Just wanted to put it out there in case anyone else was struggling


1

Two possible solutions are given in this thread: Upload error: avrdude: ser_open(): can't set com-state for "\.\COM17" This post says: i am able to fix this problem very easily... just press reset button on arduino and unplug from usb and go to the arduino software installation directory (c:/program files/ arduino) and open drivers folder and open ...


1

This isn't really a 3D-printing issue as much as it is about Arduino, USB, and how serial connections over USB differ from a generic UART serial connection. For a UART-based serial connection, there are only two devices, and both devices are peers - either can send data to the other with no real restrictions as long as the speeds are set correctly. USB ...


1

The motors are powered from 12/24V external power supply, so the motors will not be powered. the ramps Schematics shows the connection diagram and the power is provided via the VMot pin/12V.


1

If you are using a USB 3 port to connect the printer to your PC, try connecting via a USB 2 hub. My Vector 3 will not work on a USB 3 port, only on a USB 2 or lower. The device correctly mounts and presents but serial communication fails. One of my laptops only has USB 3 ports on it, so to work around the limitation I connect via a cheap USB 2 hub. I ...


1

The Simplify3D support site mentions to disable the "wait for startup command" option in the firmware configuration for S3D. This allows me to make a rudimentary connection to control the printer, however e.g. during the bed levelling wizard of S3D, the connection still breaks off. It works reliably with Octoprint. I'll consider that good enough.


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