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Taken in order your questions: Maintenance for a resin printer means keeping the vat or tray clean, using appropriate methods to remove the unused resin (or leaving it in the vat per manufacturer's directions). Cleaning the tray should be done also per manufacturer's spec, although each printer's user forum may provide better or more effective options. The ...


5

I will take the question seriously, and consider reasons why Carbon 3D might choose to offer their technology through a yearly subscription, rather than building a product accessible to the consumer market. These reasons are speculation and do not reflect any specific knowledge about Carbon 3D, the details of their technology, or anything unique about their ...


4

Despite how many vendors make it appear, resin-curing SLA/DLP printers are industrial or commercial tools that are really not suitable for home desktop use. Here are the major downsides: Significantly more expensive to operate than FDM printers, in most cases. The resin is seriously toxic until fully cured. Fumes can be an issue for users handling raw ...


3

In our experience, the parts will continue to cure. I don't have the chemical science background to provide proof or evidence, but I operate from an assumption that if the part requires UV rays to cure, it will continue to be reactive to UV rays after it is considered "cured". I too have found the same brittleness over long periods of time. The only ...


2

When using a DLP 3D printer, a projector (or other UV light source) is shining on a layer of resin. As the light source shines on a whole layer at a time, it is able to print at a rather constant linear vertical rate. This rate is normally around 2.5 cm (1 inch)/hour When comparing this to a standard FDM printer or a single laser system (such as the Pegasus ...


2

You've covered a couple of concerns "outside the box," but the real tests will come when you pour some of the resin into the vat. If you don't get a reaction with the release layer, score one for your side. The release layer is a silicone kind of compound, which typically is un-reactive to most substances, but that's not to say the thinner qualifies in ...


2

Factually, the correct process is to heat up the mold hot enough to evaporate the positive. In investment casting the process to remove the wax or plastic positive is called the "Dewax" and "Burnout preheating". The answer to your question depends on the material you use to generate a negative mold of the positive product. E.g. many silicate based ...


2

It looks like they have only one innovation: their resins. Everything else looks like standard SLA. All the things Carbon 3D are pitching on their website are more about having a dedicated support team than some fancy printer, and that's what they're selling. As to why they don't make a home version: why would they? It's at best a distraction from their ...


1

The print you do is a sealed cup in the position it sits directly on the build plate. As a result, there is a column of resin in the cup as you print and at some point, the weakest spot delaminates, the air gets into the column and drains. Take the print and either angle it by a few degrees so the hole in the top becomes a vent or add a tiny extra vent-hole.


1

You are correct, you can over cure a print by leaving it out in the sun. Prints can even over cure just by the ambient light in a room from the sun (though it would take a while). One easy option to counter this krylon UV-Resistant Clear Coating which can be found at most hardware stores. I have used it but I found that it made my print a little softer this ...


1

I'd go for the easy option of using a composite setup: Acrylic lacquers themselves are very low reactive and can serve as a foundation before the UV clear coating is applied. The acrylic lacquer itself doesn't change coloration if exposed to sunlight, but the light can still pass and discolor the lithophane. Your Krylon clearcoat technically is an acrylic ...


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Hmm I seen videos off people pealing filters off of lcd screens to let uv pass through. I believe the sharp unit maybe popular because not all lcds have square pixels and have poor pixel alignment towards the edges, (the focus of the eye can only take in so much information why waste materials producing inperceptable rises in quality, much like having a 8k ...


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Traditional lost molds. The reason many jewelers use wax for making the molds for lost mold casting is, that it has (compared to plastic molding materials) a very low melting and boiling point, allowing to create molds with much lower temperature equipment. A variant of green sand casting is done with materials that very quickly decompose in contact with the ...


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I've created software to do just that. See the project on Github: CreateMask. It has a wiki page that explains what to do. To summarize: you measure the LCD build area using a multi-meter and a light dependent resistor. You do this with low and high intensity masks. You feed the numbers in CSV files to the software, and the software will generate a mask for ...


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